Axminster Chuck Jaw Dovetail Sizes - Odd range - Any other suppliers?

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RichardG

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I have an Axminster chuck plus the type A, B & C dovetail jaws. The smallest dovetailed tenon the type A jaws will grip is about 58mm which I frequently find too large. I don't have any reversing jaws so the bowl tenon is often my finished foot. The type C jaw will go to 52mm but it's not a dovetail so tends to mark the wood. I've looked through Axminster's range of jaws and the only way of getting a smaller dovetail is to buy one of their O'Donnell jaws which are £££. I've attached a quick reference sheet I made a while back which I keep pinned near the lathe, may be of use to someone else? I thought I'd solved the problem by buying a set of the Versachuck jaws which fit, are very reasonably priced and have a full range of dovetail sizes, however, the dovetail angle is more like 10 degrees rather than the 15 degrees of the Axminster which I think looks odd as a finished foot but perhaps it's just me. The Axminster 15 degree angle also matches my skew chisel which makes it a doddle to cut accurately.

Any this is long way of asking whether any other jaws fit the Axminster chucks,? Searching though older posts I'm pretty sure the answer is no but wanted to double check as things do change.

Richard
Axminster Chuck Jaws.png
 

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Paul Hannaby

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I wouldn't leave a dovetail on a finished piece so the jaw sizes are almost immaterial. I would either turn away the spigot completely or reshape/resize it to make a foot. Limiting the base size to whatever jaws are available often leads to compromises on shape.
 

RichardG

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I wouldn't leave a dovetail on a finished piece so the jaw sizes are almost immaterial. I would either turn away the spigot completely or reshape/resize it to make a foot. Limiting the base size to whatever jaws are available often leads to compromises on shape.
Thanks Paul,

I think you're probably right, I need to spend more time getting my reverse chucking sorted. I've done it a few times, tried a squashed tennis ball, a flat plate with none slip matting and just putting it over the top of the chuck but I've always found the centre and tailstock to be so restrictive and ended up with a worse shaped and smaller foot than I wanted. I've also manage to clip the finish on a couple of occasions. This probably says more about my skill level than anything else.
 

gog64

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Sounds like you are on the right track with a flat disk and something grippy on the headstock end. Then a pointy live centre (technical jargon!) on the tailstock. Turn the tenon down to a small nub with a small sharp gouge. Take care to use a safe speed. I remove the bulk of the tenon with push cuts towards the headstock and tidy up with a light cut across. Take it off the lathe, knock the nub off with a chisel and get out the sander. There’s other ways, but that works for me.
 

RichardG

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Then a pointy live centre (technical jargon!) on the tailstock. Turn the tenon down to a small nub with a small sharp gouge.

I only have a live ring centre, something to add to the purchase list.
 

Robbo3

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Try to keep your centre mark as long as possible then you can re-use it if needed.
For level rimmed bowls just pressing them against a wooden faceplate is adequate.
For uneven rimmed bowls make a mushroom shape, to be held in a chuck & long enough so that when the inside of the bowl is pressed against it, the rim is rotating without obstruction - both using your carefully preserved centre mark of course.
 
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