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marcros

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I am going to reuse the old handle, or at least try to. I may as well use this method so that if it doesn't work then I don't have a problem drilling out the wedges.

Silly question, but you make the cuts for the wooden wedges, drive in the lengthways one. How do the crossways ones fit, because the cut will be blocked by the first wedge.

And warm, are we talking sat on the radiator for a good while or too warm to handle without gloves?
 

Tris

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Warm was left on top of the boiler in the workshop, you'd have needed rigger gloves to handle them for long.
The lengthways wedge was cut a gnats shorter than the length of the eye then a small chisel used to open a split *in line with the kerf* to allow the crosswise wedge to be driven in.

*Edited for clarity
 

marcros

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Another axe handle related question- I see ash and hornbeam used and assume that these are the traditional options and stand the test of time. Is beech as good, there seem to be a lot of the cheaper ones made from this, or is it a ruse to use a cheap timber to unwary eBay/Amazon shoppers looking to save a couple of quid?
 

scholar

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I bought a couple of replacement handles from these people Replacement Tool Handles | Bulldog Tools | bulldoghandtools.co.uk

One of the jobs was a smallish roofing axe (I think) that again had been passed on by my Dad. I had found a historic spec of the axe and the original handle was a somewhat different shape, but I thought these were very good value and avoided making one myself.

The shaft end needed some trial and error reshaping to fit the head which was a bit laborious - I used this set of wedges Axe Hammer Repair Wooden Small Wedge iron Wedges Handle Shaft Replacement | eBay
This worked well (although I lost a bit of the end of the wooden wedge that I have yet to patch up for cosmetics purposes - alongside a regrind)

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Cheers
 

stevek

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I picked up a Sandvic splitting maul head only which is an ugly brut but extreamly effective, its basicly a sledge hammer with one side formed into an axe head with short steep sides and its just a whacking great weight that splits logs really well. The handle is a Sledge hammer one, dead straight and thick and I spent a good deal of time trimming it to fit and its been perfect for 3 or 4 yrs heavy use. If the Maul bounces off I have a pair of wedges and these with a heavy sledge will split most things,,,and if even they are going to struggle a chainsaw will rip down gnarley big rounds which then seems easier to split once they've been opened up. The chopper above is a darling little thing and perfect for kindling, but using a Felling Axe to split logs is hard work. Whats a “roofing” axe btw?
 

Nebbishneb

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My dad gave me an axe. Either a felling axe or a forestry axe, I am not sure of the difference. It is old, but nothing special and I would think that it was probably from my grandfather's shed when cleared or a farm sale somewhere. Perfectly functional with a bit of tidying.

Therein lies the problem. It needs rehandling, which means I need to buy a handle and a wedge. It needs a good sharpen because it is so blunt that where the bevels meet is flat rather than pointed and I don't mean on a microscopic level.

I will get it back into a usable condition because I have a use for it and I don't want to chuck it in the corner and unnecessarily buy something else. I can understand why people don't bother because it will cost me £20 and an hour or two to do. I don't have any ash but to make a handle would take me much longer even if I had the timber For £30 I can buy a brand new Stihl forestry axe or one of several on eBay that only need sharpening. Frustratingly, despite Leeds being a big city, I can't easily find anywhere with an axe handle in stock (admittedly using Google).
I think selco near Sheepscar should have one in stock or you could try Woodlands over by Horsforth. I used to be in Leeds and I definitely now miss having decent lumber yards and interesting builders merchants so close to hand.
 

marcros

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I think selco near Sheepscar should have one in stock or you could try Woodlands over by Horsforth. I used to be in Leeds and I definitely now miss having decent lumber yards and interesting builders merchants so close to hand.
where did you use for timber? I struggle a bit- usually use British hardwoods over in keighley. I am just next to horsforth so will have a look there.
 

Tris

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I don't think I've ever seen a beech handle on a felling axe although I have a side axe with what looks like a beech handle. Hickory makes a good alternative to ash or hornbeam, usually of US manufacture.
Would beech resist the sort of shock forces and leverage? Quite possibly but I think it would lack the 'springiness' of the others and be less comfortable in use.
 

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