Anybody else love bandsaws?

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Molynoox

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I recently acquired a bandsaw, somewhat unplanned, but bargain price so went for it. I don't even have my workshop finished yet but I built a small mobile base for it and that works really well, leave it in situ for small cuts and pull it out when I need more room at the back for outfeed.

Anyway, I'm a very inexperienced woodworker having only really built two or three things so far, but I'm finding the bandsaw absolutely brilliant and use it on every project. It's just so unbelievably handy for making quick cuts, it's not noisy, and feels really safe in use.

I really like the complete lack of setup time, just walk over to it, switch it on and off you go. I suppose that's true of many floor standing machines but I don't own any so it's a novelty for me 😃

There are some things it can do that I doubt any other machine would do, re-sawing for example is so useful, I recently repurposed a load of cedar cladding boards I had, reducing from 20mm thick down to 10mm think. Without the bandsaw I would have had to buy more wood and have thicker slats than needed structurally. Overengineering. This way I save money, save a trip to the shop, and also have a good feeling that I'm using the right wood for the job.

I know I'm late to the party here, and not bringing any new information but im such a big fan of this machine now that I thought I would share my thoughts 😃

I'm sure a table saw would be needed for perfectly accurate cuts, like making an end grain chopping board for example, but for my type of projects and most of the cutting I do the bandsaw is 'good enough' and the perfect tool for the job.

Anyway, that's all for now 😅

Martin
 

Spectric

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and feels really safe in use.
Yes that is a huge plus for the bandsaw, you can work closer to the blade and keep your digits unlike the table saw. You don't say what make and model of bandsaw you have aquired, but for good blades look at Tuffsaws as a lot of people round here use them and they give better cuts than many of the OEM blades.
 

BravoNovember

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I recently acquired a bandsaw, somewhat unplanned, but bargain price so went for it. I don't even have my workshop finished yet but I built a small mobile base for it and that works really well, leave it in situ for small cuts and pull it out when I need more room at the back for outfeed.

Anyway, I'm a very inexperienced woodworker having only really built two or three things so far, but I'm finding the bandsaw absolutely brilliant and use it on every project. It's just so unbelievably handy for making quick cuts, it's not noisy, and feels really safe in use.

I really like the complete lack of setup time, just walk over to it, switch it on and off you go. I suppose that's true of many floor standing machines but I don't own any so it's a novelty for me 😃

There are some things it can do that I doubt any other machine would do, re-sawing for example is so useful, I recently repurposed a load of cedar cladding boards I had, reducing from 20mm thick down to 10mm think. Without the bandsaw I would have had to buy more wood and have thicker slats than needed structurally. Overengineering. This way I save money, save a trip to the shop, and also have a good feeling that I'm using the right wood for the job.

I know I'm late to the party here, and not bringing any new information but im such a big fan of this machine now that I thought I would share my thoughts 😃

I'm sure a table saw would be needed for perfectly accurate cuts, like making an end grain chopping board for example, but for my type of projects and most of the cutting I do the bandsaw is 'good enough' and the perfect tool for the job.

Anyway, that's all for now 😅

Martin
Yes I am with you on this one. I largely try and keep things unplugged or a bit trad in my workshop, but, recently got a record power band saw and love it a bit to be honest.
 

robgul

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Yep - I only have a pretty small bandsaw (much regret that I didn't buy a bigger one) - really useful and with fence, fingerboards, mitre slide etc . Mine is also on a wheeled base with the table at the same height as my main work- and MFT benches for in and outfeed - oh, and dust extraction connected to my piped system too.

In early 2020 (before lockdown) I went on a bandsaw course at Axminster - very useful for operation, tips and tricks as well as blade tooth selection, blade fitting etc . . . I did actually make a jaunt of it with their 2-day router course at the same time.

I sold my table saw and the band saw and track saw do pretty much everything I need (and my supplier is pretty helpful with free cutting of sheet materials, if only to make collection and handling easier)
 

Molynoox

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I have two bandsaws both 10" and I struggle to get them to cut straight.

Much prefer my table saw tbh.
I think mine cuts pretty straight - I spent an hour messing with the adjustments the other day, the guides etc, and I also have the tuffsaws blade on there, and it seems to cut very well. I'm no expert in setup either, about as far from that as you can imagine, but the fettling seems to have made a big difference.
Martin
 

Molynoox

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Yes that is a huge plus for the bandsaw, you can work closer to the blade and keep your digits unlike the table saw. You don't say what make and model of bandsaw you have aquired, but for good blades look at Tuffsaws as a lot of people round here use them and they give better cuts than many of the OEM blades.
Its an elektra bekum 306
I did buy 3 tuffsaw blades and that made a huge difference to how it was cutting when I first got it. The setup of guides etc made another leap forwards but I would saw the new blades were the big one.

Here is a picture of my very shady workshop setup
workshop1.jpg


Martin
 

Sandyn

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My bandsaw is one of my most versatile tools. I use it all the time. As the OP said. very easy to set up and accurate enough for most things I do. It's a pleasure using tools that are easy to use, pretty safe and do what they are supposed to.
 

rob1693

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I use mine for dimensioning timber with good blades and it comes in real handy for firewood and logs with older blades lot safer than chop saw quicker and a lot less mess with extraction ,chop saw chucks sh#t everywhere I have a table saw too but bandsaw definitely the go too
 

Molynoox

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Yep - I only have a pretty small bandsaw (much regret that I didn't buy a bigger one) - really useful and with fence, fingerboards, mitre slide etc . Mine is also on a wheeled base with the table at the same height as my main work- and MFT benches for in and outfeed - oh, and dust extraction connected to my piped system too.

In early 2020 (before lockdown) I went on a bandsaw course at Axminster - very useful for operation, tips and tricks as well as blade tooth selection, blade fitting etc . . . I did actually make a jaunt of it with their 2-day router course at the same time.

I sold my table saw and the band saw and track saw do pretty much everything I need (and my supplier is pretty helpful with free cutting of sheet materials, if only to make collection and handling easier)
That's pretty interesting that you have replaced the table saw with tracksaw and bandsaw. I have a track saw already so maybe I don't need a table saw.

Do you not have any difficulty getting parallel cuts? For example the sort of thing a table saw would excel at, feed in the wood and cut perfect 100mm wide strips for example. With track saw that would be a faff and also potentially inaccurate in terms of parallelism (is that even a word). I suppose you would use some sort of stop block for the workpiece to get the 100mm and dogs for the rail, and also dogs for top of workpiece so it slides parallel. Hmm, maybe that would work, might have just convinced myself without your answer 😅

Martin
 

Bojam

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That's pretty interesting that you have replaced the table saw with tracksaw and bandsaw. I have a track saw already so maybe I don't need a table saw.

Do you not have any difficulty getting parallel cuts? For example the sort of thing a table saw would excel at, feed in the wood and cut perfect 100mm wide strips for example. With track saw that would be a faff and also potentially inaccurate in terms of parallelism (is that even a word). I suppose you would use some sort of stop block for the workpiece to get the 100mm and dogs for the rail, and also dogs for top of workpiece so it slides parallel. Hmm, maybe that would work, might have just convinced myself without your answer 😅

Martin

I don't have a tablesaw. I use a combination of bandsaw, tracksaw and planer thicknesser. Most ripping is done on the bandsaw. It cuts straight and true with a sharp Tuffsaws blade installed. Joint the ripped edge on the surface planer and thickness to dimension. Alternatively can use the tracksaw to get parallel edges if required. Benchdogs fence on an MFT style table with some inpromptu stop blocks work fine as long as you're careful. Crosscuts done on the mitre saw or with the tracksaw depending on width.

Before anyone (yes, I looking at you @TRITON ;) ) gets angsty about tracksaw fanboys or tablesaw naysayers, let me be clear. I recognise the value of a quality tablesaw and if I had the space I'd seriously consider getting one. I'm not talking about a portable site saw but a stationary machine like a Laguna Fusion or whatever. Except I don't have the space. And the above combination allows me to do basically everything I require in a small footprint workshop. My method of working may take marginally longer in some instances but I don't feel like I'm hampered. I'd say a decent bandsaw is much more versatile than a tablesaw and the joinery stuff people do using a tablesaw can be done using other tools such a the very versatile router.

I should add that I recently bought the Bridge City Jointmaker pro with precision fence (see also here). For those that don't know it's effectively a manual tablesaw with an inverted thin-kerf japanese blade and sliding tables. It's super accurate, the cuts are incredibly clean and - importantly for me - it's near to silent. The cut capacity is ~150mm (rip or crosscut) so only good for small projects or small parts for larger projects. Great for precise joinery. I bought it primarily to work quietly in the evenings and at weekends with no fear of waking the kids or disturbing the neighbours. But it actually gets used as part of my regular workflow more than I anticipated. I also like the idea of using it to teach my daughters to work wood.
 

TRITON

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Before anyone (yes, I looking at you @TRITON ;) ) gets angsty about tracksaw fanboys or tablesaw naysayers
:LOL:

Well actually I did have a tracksaw, but ive since sold it(It was a cheapo screwfix one) and am looking to buy another. Just cant decide as to whether its going to be a 240v bosch, or a cordless bosch.
Im also thinking of selling the tablesaw, and replacing it with a 14" bandsaw. I think my tiny wee workshop would benefit with having a single better sized bench to work on,Something that I can lay a wide sheet on, rather than doing the work on top of the tablesaw, which isnt ideal these days.

Im embarking on a new layout, so making these changes would probably be the better idea. Certainly its going to be safer than the tablesaw, but im sure im going to miss some of the benefits of the table, but I do a fair bit in sheet material these days, so a proper plunge saw would likely be the best option. Im pretty sure a more powerful bandsaw with larger capacities should fill the gap.

My digs at the track fanbois is more a bit of humour, and tbh they are a bit elitist, and tbh Ive never liked the elitist attitude, hence poking them whenever i can :LOL:

Right tool for the right job.:cool:
 

Jonm

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I am pretty frustrated with mine. I expected it to be as easy to use as the OP suggested but find it very difficult to set up. Thinking of selling it to maybe buy a different make. It’s a Kity 613.
I have a kitty 513 which seems to be identical to the 613. Cannot get on with it. Nothing seems damaged or worn but the blade will not stay on the wheels. I have taken the table off, used a rigid straight edge with wooden blocks to get the wheels in line, checked with the blade tensioned. Have adjusted the bottom wheel as well. Nothing seems to work.

I am using the blade which came with the machine, plan was to get it working then buy some tuffsaw blades. I am wondering if there is a problem with the blade. My other thought is that these saws have flat wheels so the blade is positioned with the teeth overhanging the edge of the wheel. Perhaps the more normal crowned wheels have a self centring effect. Any thoughts?

Normally I would not ask a question like this in another post but molynoox is not asking a question here, it’s a general chit chat about bandsaws.

I have a metal cutting bandsaw and a cheap, small three wheel bandsaw for wood and no problems with these.
 

Garden Shed Projects

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My problem is identical. I have spent hours setting it up but with no luck. Having the tooth hang off the wheel slightly just doesn’t seem to afford the blade enough grip to stay on, especially the narrower blade.
 

dephill

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I had exactly the same realisation a few years ago when I got mine. I was working/playing out of a 4’ x 5’ storage room on the 3rd floor of a block of flats in Brixton and the bandsaw felt revelatory, even though by then I already had a (invaluable) tracksaw for work.
A26F5BDE-3FCE-4623-BD37-01CAEDECEDB2.jpeg
 

robgul

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That's pretty interesting that you have replaced the table saw with tracksaw and bandsaw. I have a track saw already so maybe I don't need a table saw.

Do you not have any difficulty getting parallel cuts? For example the sort of thing a table saw would excel at, feed in the wood and cut perfect 100mm wide strips for example. With track saw that would be a faff and also potentially inaccurate in terms of parallelism (is that even a word). I suppose you would use some sort of stop block for the workpiece to get the 100mm and dogs for the rail, and also dogs for top of workpiece so it slides parallel. Hmm, maybe that would work, might have just convinced myself without your answer 😅

Martin

I guess it really depends on what I'm sawing - most of the time it's relatively large (i.e. not 100mm strips) pieces of sheet materials - I have the Benchdogs rail clips and collection of dogs and stops that work with my MFT to get square and repeat cuts (I'm not averse to screwing a stop-block into the MFT if I can't clamp it) Narrower stuff works on the bandsaw, using some home-made fingerboards.

I have to admit that the table saw I had was a cheapie one and not that brilliant - the balance of use/performance/quality of cut/space it took up etc prompted me to sell it (and I was offered more than I had paid for it 18 months earlier!!)
 

Linwoodjoinery

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Agree with jonm and garden shed projects. I had a Kity too and whatever I did or tried I could not get in with it. Spent hours and in the end got rid of it. Having only previously used big old cast band saws before this I was left disappointed with the Kity. Which is a shame as I have had other Kity machines which have been superb.
 

Jonm

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My problem is identical. I have spent hours setting it up but with no luck. Having the tooth hang off the wheel slightly just doesn’t seem to afford the blade enough grip to stay on, especially the narrower blade.
Have you managed to get it working at all, and with which blade?
Mine has a 3/8 inch fitted. Tuffsaws were very helpful and recommended three blades 1/4, 1/2 and 5/8 inch. I did not go ahead as I cannot get the blade I have to stay on the wheel.
 

whatknot

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I started out with a bruised and battered three wheel bandsaw, cost me £20, I managed to get it going and have used it ever since, still do for odds and ends when needed

I also bought a used Record BS250 which is my main go to saw, it comes in handy for so many things

Then a few years ago I decided I really needed a table saw, poor decision as I have used just twice since I bought it

So yes very versatile machines bandsaws, hard to know how it took me so long to get one
 
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