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Another re-handled saw.

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Nigel Burden

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As most hand saws have handles that are too large for my hands I usually end up making new handles. The saw below is my fathers 1970s Sandvik tenon saw with a horrible plastic handle that was uncomfortable to use, so it needed a new handle.
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I decided to make it London Pattern out of beech.

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After marking out I bored the curves on the horns and other curved areas using various auger bits. I then cut the slot for the blade before I shaped the handle, If I messed up at this stage I hadn't spent time shaping the handle. Then I used a coping saw to cut out the shape, followed by a rasp and sanbpaper.


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You will notice from the following photos that I had managed to break the small lambs tongue and had to glue it back on.

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The handle after shaping.


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Showing the slot for the blade back.

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The blade fitted.

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And finally oiled with BLO.

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The saw is now far more comfortable to use.

Nigel.
 

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Argus

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It looks as if you have the same issue with saw handles as I do - handles too big, hands too small.
I've favoured pistol-grip handles for that reason, they tend to be more compact in comparison with the full sized versions.
That's a nice piece of work and I guess that given a comfortable template, you can repeat it many times over.
All best
 

Nigel Burden

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It looks as if you have the same issue with saw handles as I do - handles too big, hands too small.
I've favoured pistol-grip handles for that reason, they tend to be more compact in comparison with the full sized versions.
That's a nice piece of work and I guess that given a comfortable template, you can repeat it many times over.
All best
I have a number of templates that I downloaded from The TGIAG Tool Works website. I don't always stick rigidly to the template though, and it's fairly easy to make personal adjustments to suit yourself.

The only pistol-grip handle that I made was on a S&J tenon saw that I re-purposed as a dovetail saw.

Nigel.
 

AndyT

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Nice work!
A cheeky question if I may, just to prove I was paying attention... Are you left handed?
 

Argus

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Nice work!
A cheeky question if I may, just to prove I was paying attention... Are you left handed?
Southpaw screws?
I didn't spot that........
 

Nigel Burden

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Nice work!
A cheeky question if I may, just to prove I was paying attention... Are you left handed?
No, but I am a bit ambidextrous, with some tasks naturally being done left handed.

My wife tried to teach me to knit forty odd years ago before we were married. she gave up because I was apparently going the wrong way, ie. left handed.:rolleyes:


Nigel.
 

Nigel Burden

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Thanks for the comments guys. Some might ask why bother, but I derive a lot of satisfaction doing things like this.

Nigel.
 

Jackbequick

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Southpaw screws?
I didn't spot that........
Interesting ...different perceptions, with the way Nigel has done it!...I ...if asked...would have though and said 'right handed' not 'cacky-handed'...why? because the most visible part of the handle when right handed sawing is the right hand side...which on Nigel's handle parades the (modern-type fixing) plain-finish surface. When I grabbed my closest panel saw I saw the insignia'd side of the fixings is on the left hand side of the saw, thus the slotted side to the right. Queer that!...although some might argue it must have been a right-handed assembler.

Hmmmm maybe when a saw is laid down in advertising demonstration it is laid down with the teeth towards us and thus the insignia showing. Is there madness in the method or method in.........

Interesting also (to me perhaps alone!) is that I was raised calling a shorter, thinner hand-saw with finer teeth 'panel saw' ...as useful for sawing panels without damage. Now what is called a 'panel saw' is a mechanical thing.

Once more I rush to the breach, once more..... to quote Ernie Entwhistle's chair and pipe bound dad in the Radio Fun cartoon..."daft I call it"
 
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Jackbequick

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No, but I am a bit ambidextrous, with some tasks naturally being done left handed.

My wife tried to teach me to knit forty odd years ago before we were married. she gave up because I was apparently going the wrong way, ie. left handed.:rolleyes:


Nigel.
Was that actually adding thread to the skein?....Uh oh!!...of course.not, what a preposterous thought! however with a little more empathy she could have let you go, knitting scarves for left handed people.
 

Nigel Burden

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To be honest, I didn't give it a thought as to whether there was a particular way that the screws were fixed for left or right handed use. You learn something every day.

Nigel.
 

Nigel Burden

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Was that actually adding thread to the skein?....Uh oh!!...of course.not, what a preposterous thought! however with a little more empathy she could have let you go, knitting scarves for left handed people.
I feel that I must clarify a point here. I hadn't asked to be taught how to knit, she just thought that it would be interesting to see if I could. It would never work though, as she has absolutely no patience to teach anyone anything.

Nigel.
 

Nigel Burden

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nice job nigel 👏 much better than the original handle!
Thank you.

The original handle was an abomination. Father used it ok, but his hands were larger than mine. In fact most mass produced saws have handles that are too large for my hands. I have one old S&J saw with a handle that is ok, but that was made probably pre 1960s. My cross cut S&J which was bought when I left school in 1967 had one of those one size fits all handles which has now been replaced.

Nigel.
 
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