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An improved Moxon vise

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Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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I am about to begin my next build, and it has 8 drawers. As many of you know, I like making drawers ... complex drawers. And these ones are no exception.[

It got me thinking about the improvements I'd like to make to my Moxon vise. I have plans to make a new Moxon vise, using steel screws and iron wheels ala BenchCrafted, and all the parts are waiting in my workshop. But they will wait until this build is completed. And so I decided to modify the Moxon vise I have been using for the past 8 years. 

The Moxon vise is not simply about holding a board to saw dovetails. It is also about holding two boards together to transfer the tails to the pin board. 

In regard to the holding-to-transfer, David Barron designed a useful jig, a dovetail alignment board ...



The issue I have with this is that I do not want another appliance to add to the ones I already have. But I like the idea, and wanted to incorporate it.

To cut to the chase, here is my modified Moxon vise ....



The first item is the ledge at the rear, which is covered in non-slip. The non-slip is for stair treads. The ledge is an idea taken from Joel Moskowitz (Tools for Working Wood), and is intended to use with a clamp when the tail board may need to be clamped. I have used clamps in the past, and so I know it is a good idea.

Where this ledge differs is that it has a raised, hinged section, that places the tail board 16mm above the chop. This was also present on my previous version ...



This allows the higher section to be folded out of the way when sawing ...



The reason for this is that a coplanar top surface will lead to the chop being marked up by the knife when transferring the tails. This is the reason I recommend that the Moxon vise does not receive a table at the rear. It is why I prefer instead to raise the work piece up higher than the chop, out of harms way. The rear of the board is supported by the "I-beam" (which can be seen in the photos. 



The inside of the chop and the vise face are now covered by a material made from a composite of cork and rubber. BenchCrafted sell this as "crubber". I researched it on the 'Net and purchased a large piece on eBay. 



Note above that there are dados in the chop and the face. The dado in the face has a recessed rare earth magnet. 

I had an idea to make an integral, but removable alignment fence. This is a steel angle faced with hardwood ...



It slots into the dado, and is held firmly ...





And then is used in the same manner as an alignment board ...



I hope this can be used by others.

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

Just4Fun

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That is interesting. I have been musing on a similar design, with one added feature. In my head (and it has got no further as yet) the alignment fence would be reversible and the 2 legs would be offset. Insert it one way and the horizontal leg would be one saw kerf to the left of the vertical leg. Reverse it and the horizontal leg would be one saw kerf to the right of the vertical leg. This would provide positive alignment and accurate positioning when using Rob Cosman's method of transferring the tails onto the pin board before the waste is removed from the tail board. Basically combining David Barron's alignment board with Rob Cosman's transfer marking and hopefully improving on both. What do you think?
 

Derek Cohen (Perth Oz)

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I have an alternate method of transferring tails to pin board - I use a thin-bladed knife, and so an offset is unnecessary. It is used to cut into blue tape. Only a single stroke is needed to leave a very clear outline. I'd say that 99% of the time my dovetails go together off the saw.

http://www.inthewoodshop.com/Furniture/ ... eTape.html

Regards from Perth

Derek
 

woodbloke66

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I use the transfer jig shown in Rob Ingham's book 'Cutting Edge Cabinetmaking' - Rob
 

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