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Alternatives to planer/jointers

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Anonymous

Guest
Hi,

Having exhausted my quota of toys for the year :cry: , I am still without a planer/jointer (and lots of other cool stuff too). I am thinking that I might be able to forego this tool if I buy a decent (and long) straight cutter for my router & use it in my router table. It seems logicically just the same idea as a jointer, just turned by 90 degrees. I have a Ryobi 601 & a DeWalt 621 router and a heavy "Woodcraft" router table with a decent fence.

Have any of you done similar and what sort of results do you get compared to a jointer.

PS B&Q are selling a jointer for £120 - is it any good? I might be able to persuade the missus to buy me an early christmas present :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I saw something like this suggested in the book 'Router Magic'.

I suppose if you only want to do board edges (< couple of inches thick, depending upon your cutter) it should be OK.

I think that you will need to have a split fence though, as you will need to have an infeed and outfeed side to allow for the thickness removed by the cut. Hence one side will need shimming out compared to the other.

I too would like to know if anyone has seen or used the B&Q Jointer.

(Axminster do a Perform range on for about £180, and Screwfix for a Rexxon one for about £200, or a couple of places do a NuTool one for £125, if your looking for a budget jointer)

"Christmas is coming..is the Wifes purse fat??" :p
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Wife's budget will probably stretch to £125 or so for a jointer. Would it be worth me chipping in to go up to the £200 level, or would I be ok with the budget brands.

Maybe I should stick with my router idea & spend the £125 on new router bits.

Also, I'm not convinced that I'd need a split fence. If you look at the surface of a jointer, its one, flat piece of metal, so surely thats just like a simple straight router fence :?:
 

Charley

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elvch01":1ur21pgk said:
Also, I'm not convinced that I'd need a split fence. If you look at the surface of a jointer, its one, flat piece of metal, so surely thats just like a simple straight router fence :?:
You really do need a split fence for using the router table as a jointer. A jointer it has two tables, a infeed and outfeed table.
The outfeed table is the same height as the cutters and the infeed table is adjustable and is set lower than the outfeed table.

I reviewed Axminster's Perform jointer here. and James (sawdustalley) has done a review on the Nu-tool Jointer here :D
 
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Anonymous

Guest
thanks for the correction & the advice - I'll probably try to persuade the missus to buy me the preform model & chip in whatever extra I need
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Dr Duncan":gnzo9426 said:
I saw something like this suggested in the book 'Router Magic'.
Just read "Router Magic" & found the relevant section. I might try and set up a split fence as suggested - just to see if I can do it
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I know you all love your tailed demons, peeps. Hey, I do too. But instead of throwing your money away on cheapo jointers, why not buy a second hand #7 hand plane? They're the biz for planing edges, which is all the router set up can do anyway. Cut a rebate in a piece of wood and clamp it to the side of the plane for a right angle fence if you have trouble getting the cut square. It'll last a lifetime, and still be useful when you've saved up for a decent planer thicknesser. Plus it'll do large flat areas that a 6" jointer won't touch.
Anyway, elvch01, if you are so unfamiliar with the machinery that you intend to buy (viz: "If you look at the surface of a jointer, its one, flat piece of metal, so surely thats just like a simple straight router fence ") then will you be able to use it safely? Find a good book on the subject and do a little research before you spend. It'll pay you in the long run.
Rant over. :wink:

Cheers, Jester
Trying to do her bit in saving the world's woodworkers from playing "Hunt the finger"... :shock:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Jester":1mbkhnqs said:
Anyway, elvch01, if you are so unfamiliar with the machinery that you intend to buy (viz: "If you look at the surface of a jointer, its one, flat piece of metal, so surely thats just like a simple straight router fence ") then will you be able to use it safely? Find a good book on the subject and do a little research before you spend. It'll pay you in the long run.
Rant over. :wink:
Ouch!! the truth hurts! :shock: (but not as much as an amputated digit! :) ) I am a novice to this woodwork game, which is why I am investigating my options before splashing out.. Perhaps I shouldn't watch so much "New Yankee Workshop", it gives me cravings for power tools :wink:

Ciao & thanks ofr all the advice
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Chris,

If you want a good all round introduction to woodworking with a more balanced approach than Norm, find a copy of The Collins Complete Manual of Woodworking by Jackson & Day. Your library ought to be able to get hold of a copy, but you'll probably want to buy one if you're seriously getting into woodworking. Personally, I refer back to it all the time. It covers correct use of planers BTW, as well as many other things. Heck, you may even be inspired to try a hand tool or two... :lol:

Cheers, Jester
Who deleted an extremely long rant on the effect Norm is having on British Woodworking. Be very, very grateful... :wink:
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Hand tools??!!!! AAAggh!!!!! :shock: :!: what else would Santa bring me if not power tools?

I'm sorry, it must be a middle-aged male menopause thing about the desire for power-tools

On a more serious note, I'll take a good look at the suggested book - does anybody know its its availabe in USA, I'm working over there next week
 
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Anonymous

Guest
I agree, Norm does have a lot to answer for. But if it wasn't for the likes of him, where else would a lot of people get their enthusiasm and ideas from. The only downside to these programmes is the same problem that we went through a few years ago with motorbikes. People see them as the latest thing, go out and buy the best that they can without enough respect for the consequences(born again bikers and the latest machines didn't always mix well). The same can be said for woodworking. The vast range of machines available today is fantastic. In the woodworking industry you have to have training to use machinery. In the real world you can buy the same tools, take them home and chop your fingers of without any training at all.
I am not saying that everyone should be trained, but just be aware that the likes of Norm Abrams have been using these tools for years. Don't expext the same results just because you have the tools. But most of all, make sure you treat all of your tools with the respect they command.
PS elvch01. While you're in the states bring us back some of their cheaper machine tools.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
PAULB":tqyfyjou said:
PS elvch01. While you're in the states bring us back some of their cheaper machine tools.
No point, they're only cheaper coz they run on 120V :D That why ours are twice the price (240/120) :p

PS if anybody thinks that having all the correct tools means that the results will be like Norm's, come round and see my early efforts :oops: Just like riding a bike, or any other skill, it takes practice. Power tools generally just allow you to do the same job quicker than hand ones, so you can mess up in less time :)

PPS, I wholeheartedly endorse all above comments regarding safe operation of tools etc. - as Norm says at the start of each program ... :D
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Good old Norm eh

Why does he put so much effort into stressing safety at the beginning of the program, only to blatently egnore his own rules throughout the program :evil: "Safety guards have being removed for photographic purposes only" MY buttocks.
Whilst on about americans. What is it with you lot and safety glasses. Tune into any american program and the monkey presenting it is wearing safety glasses :roll: even to use a hand saw.
From the sublime to the rediculouse.
 

wood1000

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alll i'm going to say is lawerys,lawerys,lawerys!!!!!!! :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:
 
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Anonymous

Guest
point taken!
But what about riving knives, crown guards.................
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Being an engineer by trade I have to add one major fact that some people seem to disregard.

HOW MANY EYES DO YOU HAVE!!!!

When you are blind you are blind. End of story!
Sure we all disregard our glasses at times, but if anything happens we can't blame anyone else. In engineering workshops you are supposed to put your glasses on as soon as you enter, whether you are using a tool or not. Try watching some saftey videos to see the outcome of not wearing them.
Flying missiles seem to be stangely attracted towards eyes, whether it is from a miss struck hammer, a broken nail, chip from a planer. If it can happen, it could happen, does it hurt to take precautions.
America seems to be worse than England for blaming someone else. If someone hurts themselves copying a tv programme they would blame the presenter for not warning them of the possible dangers.
Safety has to be taken seriously in every activity. My youngest son watches me work regularly, and he has got into the habit of coppying Norm and putting on his safety glasses. I would not be able to forgive myself if a chip of wood flew across to shop and hit him in the eye. And no he does not stand beside me, or anywhere close, his safety means more to me than that. Lead by example, then our children can grow up enjoying the same hobbies as us.
 
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Anonymous

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Paul B
I could not agree more,
Many years ago (Iwas 21) I was using a lainate trimer and being as daft as you can get i did not have my glasses on :( , The result a trip to hospital to have a very tiny bit of laminate removed from my eye.
I can not disgribe the pain I was in :cry: but I have never been that stupid from that day. I was off work for 10 days, the pain lasted a lot longer
Mick B
 
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Anonymous

Guest
Jester":1g98bi4d said:
Chris,

If you want a good all round introduction to woodworking with a more balanced approach than Norm, find a copy of The Collins Complete Manual of Woodworking by Jackson & Day.
Jester, Charley - thanks for the book recommendation. I've found the US version as "The Complete Manual of Woodworking" published by Knopf (hence no "Collins"). Its the genuine article as explained by the blurb at the front and it cost only $25 at Barnes & Noble. So the US gets books cheaper as well as tools & wood - suppose it makes sense since books are made from wood :D

I will have a large amount of time to read it in my hotel room in the evenings, but won't be able to play for another 3 weeks whilst I'm globetrotting :cry:


thanks again
Chris
 
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Anonymous

Guest
You are walking down the street, the wind blows, and you get dust in your eyes, or maybe a car drives past and a stone flys up and hits you in the eye.

How often have you put safety glasses on to walk down the street?
 
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