• We invite you to join UKWorkshop.
    Members can turn off viewing Ads!

Advice on table saw on 8x4 table...

UKworkshop.co.uk

Help Support UKworkshop.co.uk:

BodgeJob

Member
Joined
19 Mar 2020
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Location
Notts
Hi all,

I’ve got a wooden 8x4 table on wheels. (Got it off eBay!)

I’d like to add a table saw to my workshop - and would like to add it to my table.

I’ve seen different designs with the table saw on the long/short side/corner - and I’m not sure where is best?

I’d love to hear your options on the best position for the saw - which table saw (the blade would need to drop into the table to keep it completely flat), id also like to have extension guides routered into my table top for better support. I don’t know which ones to get!

And I’d love to occasionally cut 8x4 sheets if possible!

thanks so much for any help and suggestions.
 

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
848
Reaction score
380
Location
Bradford
Budget?

£100 buys you a cheapy titan etc.

I wouldn't pay any more for an evolution/ Ryobi tbh.

£300 buys a s/h big name brands or a small axi / kity.

£500 buys you the above but new.

I would make sure it has an induction motor as they are so much quieter.

Cheers James
 

Myfordman

AKA 9Fingers
Joined
19 Jan 2013
Messages
2,333
Reaction score
134
Location
Southampton area
Put the blade centrally along the long side and then any cut on an 8x4 should stay supported by gravity after the cut.
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
681
Location
Derbyshire
I've got a long bench along the wall, exactly same height as my TS. With the aid of the sliding table I can cut 8x4's, with the other end sliding on the bench. MDF top - could be better with varnish and wax polish for low friction, or you could fit that low friction plastic wossitcalled stuff
Might have to move the saw relative to the bench for some cuts and you have to clear the bench of course.
So - no modification to the table of the table saw, instead work out how to feed the sheets on and off in a controlled way
 

shed9

establiSHED member
Joined
3 Nov 2013
Messages
1,573
Reaction score
206
Location
In a forest in Wales
All depends on the saw you use and what elements of it you want to retain in the final fit. If you want to use the attached fence then you are clearly going to need to place the saw on a leading edge. If it comes with any additional wings that add value (like mitre slots) then you may want to factor that in as opposed to machining new ones in the 8x4 table. Make sure you place it for best functionality for the majority of your use of it, i.e. don't place it in a position that impacts daily use in order to cut one 8x4 sheet every other month. As long as you can retract the blade and associated parts concerned with the table saw hardware you should still have a functioning 8x4 work / layout / glue up table.

Factor in safety in terms of blade exposure, where the stop switch is positioned and deal with dust extraction (above and below the table) from the outset. The protection of your fingers and lungs should be key to your design.

Buy a known brand and the best you can afford at the time of purchase and don't be swayed by additional plastic in the sale. You have already invested in the in-feed / out-feed of the saw, all you need now is a good solid motor set in a sound table with appropriate safety guards.
 

Peterm1000

Established Member
Joined
18 Dec 2018
Messages
207
Reaction score
40
Location
Godalming
I don't think there's much point in having the table extend beyond the fence. So - on my saw, the fence is to the right of the blade. You can't cut things wider than the fence will slide to the right (60cm) so there is no point having the saw set with 90cm to the right of the saw blade because the last 30cm will never be used. Also, if you have the saw bang in the middle on the leading edge, you are always going to be reaching a long way to retrieve what the saw has cut. Sometimes, that will mean you leaning over the blade. At best, that's uncomfortable and at worst, that could lead to injury. That means for me, my saw (Charnwood W650) would be set in the right hand corner nearest the leading edge if I set it into a table at all.
 

Lazurus

Established Member
Joined
22 Sep 2017
Messages
875
Reaction score
83
Location
Norfolk Broads
If you need a bigger table area buy a "proper" table saw as safety must be paramount.
 

BodgeJob

Member
Joined
19 Mar 2020
Messages
10
Reaction score
0
Location
Notts
Thanks so much guys - I still find it amazing that the forum is so active with such great replies!

I think I’ve decided not to modify my table now, and just go for a table saw I can just put onto my table when I need to use it.

i’m thinking of the Bosh GTX 10. It’s portable - so I can store it away when not being used, and it has a big extendable table.

thanks again for the help!
 

Jameshow

Established Member
Joined
4 Oct 2020
Messages
848
Reaction score
380
Location
Bradford
How about a shelf in front of the table which folds away when your not using the table saw but allows the table saw to be the same height as the table?

Cheers James
 
Last edited:

pe2dave

Established Member
Joined
2 Oct 2007
Messages
782
Reaction score
198
Location
Peterborough, Cambs, UK
Put the blade centrally along the long side and then any cut on an 8x4 should stay supported by gravity after the cut.
Blade parallel to long side - hard to get close for setup?
Otherwise agree with main point, need support for sheet when entering and exiting saw?
Wonder if this is why sliding extensions and 'add ons' are used, rather than full solid table?
 

Jacob

Pint of bass, porkpie, and packet of crisps please
Joined
7 Jul 2010
Messages
17,721
Reaction score
681
Location
Derbyshire
Blade parallel to long side - hard to get close for setup?
Otherwise agree with main point, need support for sheet when entering and exiting saw?
Wonder if this is why sliding extensions and 'add ons' are used, rather than full solid table?
Full solid table - you'd have to climb up on it to handle full sheets.
 

danst96

Established Member
Joined
21 Jan 2021
Messages
142
Reaction score
81
Location
Leeds
I have a cheap Clarke TS and I built a cabinet for it and put a MDF top on with the Rutland pro fence system as the fence with the Clarke is trash. The Rutland's fence is very good quality and a great piece of kit however in hindsight, the money I spent on all of that together (close to £400, not all at once, I used the ts as it came for months) I would have been better off getting a decent second hand Axi/Kity/Scheppach instead. Hindsight is a wonderful thing. I'm stuck with this now and it does the job but inevitably I will get a decent saw in the future. I'd recommend going this route straight away if you can. To justify my decision to do what I've done, I got the cheap TS as I wasn't sure how much woodwork I wanted to do and wasn't willing to invest £400 immediately. when I was doing more I wanted a better fence hence I went the route I did.

In short, invest in a decent table saw with induction motor and cast iron table if you are serious. I use my ts for every project

20210208_222821.jpg
 

Myfordman

AKA 9Fingers
Joined
19 Jan 2013
Messages
2,333
Reaction score
134
Location
Southampton area
Blade parallel to long side - hard to get close for setup?
Otherwise agree with main point, need support for sheet when entering and exiting saw?
Wonder if this is why sliding extensions and 'add ons' are used, rather than full solid table?
No Blade to long edge
 

Cabinetman

Established Member
Joined
5 Jan 2017
Messages
1,493
Reaction score
723
Location
lincolnshire Wolds
How about a shelf in front of the table which folds away when your not using the table saw but allows the table saw to be the same height as the table?

Cheers James
This is the way to go in my opinion, once the saw is in the table you’ll never take it out again, and it will always be in the way when you want to use the table, and you will always have to clear the table when you want to use the saw, and because no dust extraction is perfect you will have a large table to sweep down after every session.
Don’t limit yourself, keep it fluid. Ian
 

baldkev

Established Member
Joined
29 Apr 2020
Messages
105
Reaction score
32
Location
devon
In your original post, you mention dropping the blade to have a clear bench, but of course most will have and ahould have a riving knife and crown guard.....
Ive got a dw745 for site use, the knife and guard are removed very quickly, from the top, which is useful, but some are a bit more involved, like an old Clarke ts i had, you had to access it all from underneath and unbolt it.
 

Peterm1000

Established Member
Joined
18 Dec 2018
Messages
207
Reaction score
40
Location
Godalming
A full sheet of 18mm MDF weighs about 35kg and that is not going to slide easily across a table due to friction so you are unlikely to get safe / accurate cuts. I think this is why on a sliding table saw, it's the table that slides and not the piece of wood that is being cut.
 

rafezetter

Troll Hunter
Joined
11 Jun 2013
Messages
2,835
Reaction score
114
Location
Bristol
I made my bench with my Kity 419 at the end sitting on a shelf, and the kity (forerunner to the Axminster TS200 & Sheppach clones) is small enough that I can swing it 90 deg so it's either in wide rip mode or long rip mode using the rest of the bench as an outfeed. I don't use it for sheets though - Lidl / Parkside tracksaw is far safer for that.
 
Top