Advice on replacing poor quality plane blades

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JFW

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I bought four planes recently for participants to use in paddle making workshops I run. They are pairs of faithful 60 1/2 and 9 1/2. This is them: Link
I had thought that, since they wouldn't get huge usage, they would do okay.

They where okay for a few workshops but they are now giving me trouble - The body on them is fine and does what I need but the blades are proving to be a waste of money - and time trying to keep sharp. No matter what I do, once they are sharp the cutting edge chips within a few minutes of use. Picture below.

Does anyone know of a source for getting better quality blades or what I could do to solve this problem.

IMG_9891.JPG
 

Jacob

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I'm surprised - I've had plenty of cr ap planes, but blades never a problem.
I'd blame the sharpening. Yours look blued - have they been ground too heavily and over heated?
Maybe just resharpen them a few times until you are passed the crumbly bits? Freehand is better and almost impossible to over heat. And is easy with those little blades
 
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Jameshow

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Not had a problem with my faithful block plane or any of thier larger planes.

I would raise a concern and see if they will replace it? It only costs them a £1 I expect?

Cheers James
 

Ttrees

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Not uncommon for some irons to be a bit chippy for the first mm or two.
Apart from a problem with the steel itself, or indeed the angle which it were ground, should it be extremely low,
we've seen this before.

Two things come to mind which could help each other cause this issue,
1. what does the back/face of the iron look like...any rough milling marks?
2. How far are you advancing that iron....should you have huge projection and are trying to scrub into some knots, that is similar to the last time we saw this.

Could be quite decent steel on those, I'd have guessed possibly on the softer side if anything.
A few folks like James have some of these tools, so might be worth a look
to have an idea if it is the case, and if so then you shouldn't be getting chips from the iron, and the opposite case of a "foil edge" where the edge folds or mushrooms.

All the best
Tom
 

IWW

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Looks to me like you are using the blades straight off the grinder - I can't see any evidence of honing? That's not going to give you a very good edge whatever the steel quality - typically, the finer the finish, the more durable the edge..
Cheers,
 

raffo

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Looks to me like you are using the blades straight off the grinder - I can't see any evidence of honing? That's not going to give you a very good edge whatever the steel quality - typically, the finer the finish, the more durable the edge..
Cheers,
I didn't notice that. Off the grinder the edge will be so ragged, it'll crumble very soon in use.
 

okeydokey

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I'm just repeating others but it does look (zoom in the photo) as if part of the edge has been overheated (blue colour to the steel) which will make the edge crumble; you do not appear to have honed the edge which will allow the plane to cut more smoothly and consistently.
I suggest you carefully and by keeping the edge cool (not getting yellow or blue as you grind) take time - its not a speed competition - take sufficient off to get past the overheated area then hone the edge on a simple oilstone that should be sufficient.
I looked at the OP's link the seated cutting angles are 13.5 and 21 degrees - I'm not sure what that means in the grinding angle of the irons but are you following the makers shape? Ask them what angle the iron should be ground at if its not marked on the blade

Pasted info from the link
60.1/2 Block Plane has a cutter seated at 13.1/2 degrees. 35mm wide blade. Particularly effective on end grain and plastic laminates.

9.1/2 Block Plane has a cutter seated at 21 degrees. 42mm wide blade. Ideal for end grain and general purpose finishing.

Blades will require honing before use.

Let us know how you get on
 

Jacob

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If you don't know about sharpening you are likely to get drawn into a whirlpool of enthusiasts with endless advice, gadgets, expensive suggestions! Best avoided!
Just freehand hone them at 30º on a medium oil stone. Avoid jigs and powered grinders.
Once you've got the hang of it you could try "fine", which is as far as you will ever need to go.
 
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