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Adirondak chairs - timber choice

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condeesteso

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I believe the traditional choice is / was Northern / Canadian red cedar - but I expect that was partly because that's where they were.
Here in the UK, I've considered Euro oak, Siberian larch, maybe a good grade redwood.
Any ideas please?
 

Doug B

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As a lot of Adirondack are painted then accoya might be worth a look Douglas particularly for its longevity usually a similar price to euro Oak.
Then on top of what you’ve mentioned possibly sweet Chestnut or if you can stand to work the stuff Iroko
 

condeesteso

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Thanks - hadn't really thought of iroko. I recall it smells a bit nasty when worked (like bubinga, zebrano etc). I generally try to avoid African hardwoods (I'm guessing most iroko comes from Africa?).
I am quite a fan of accoya and the design / setting would suit a paint or coloured stain (Sadolins, Osmo or similar tints).
I've used chestnut before outside and it was very good, maybe a bit underrated or overlooked.
My usual local is Morgan Timber (Strood) - I'll see what iroko they have, I know they keep accoya in many board sizes. I'll check chestnut too.
Within reason, cu.ft. price isn't too big an issue so these options would be OK.
Thanks for thoughts / input.
 

George of the Wood

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I have made several from Southern Yellow Pine pressure treated decking boards. They have been outside in the elements for 12 to 15 years now and don't look to bad yet. Some have been treated with a penetrating stain and some have been left to silver naturally.

It's about the cheapest wood available here.
 

danst96

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Sapele is a great outdoors wood and is very inexpensive (normally!)
 

Bm101

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You'll need a hand powered morticer for that sort of job Douglas. Strangely, I have one for sale. Rust free. :p
 

eribaMotters

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Another vote for Iroko. I have a 20 year old pair of Adirondak chairs in Iroko that have been left out all year round with no surface finish on them. I also have a garden table and benches I made over 25 years ago in Iroko that have been outside every day. These have also no surface finish but do have a cover on over winter.

Colin
 

condeesteso

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You'll need a hand powered morticer for that sort of job Douglas. Strangely, I have one for sale. Rust free. :p
well now.... didn't I have one of those a while backo_O

SYP is an interesting one. Used sapele on a thing recently - never again for me (just personal).
If I was in northern NY state I'd use Western red of course.
This exercise reminds me I always aim to avoid African woods. Had a bad and very smelly experience with a huge bubinga board ages ago.
Still thinking oak would be a fair option. I'm having a ponder.
 

Doug B

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If you had a reaction to Bubinga @condeesteso I’d definitely steer clear of Iroko it’s the only wood that’s affected me, bloody horrible stuff.
 

Ntre25

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I'm currently building a pair using a 10 year old stock of iroko. It's not the easiest wood to work with due to its interlocking grain but it is tough and durable for outdoors.
 

Glitch

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Mine are made of Siberian Larch.

Birthday present from the wife for the newly built shed/shack. I didn't make them.

7595BD41-63C1-45DA-869A-44B417383523.jpeg
 
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marcros

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I think I would be guided by what you can get easily. I can't get larch or chestnut easily here. Iroko, probably but have never tried. Oak is readily available.
 

recipio

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Native oak would be my first choice - avoid the North American stuff. Iroko is also suitable as long as you have dust extraction on all your tools ! Lastly don't forget to use stainless steel screws.
 

condeesteso

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Liking the shed/shack @Glitch - great colour. Think I know where those chairs came from (the larch is the clue).
So a lot of good advice/input, thanks to all.
I'm ruling out iroko now - I'm thinking a local (European) wood is appropriate, just as the originals used their own local suitable timber.
Oak; larch (Russia is Europe. Proof: they were briefly in the Euro cup 'til they met Denmark:ROFLMAO:); chestnut.

I'll see what I can get and report back, might be a while as I have a few things on.....
 

Woodbear

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I believe the traditional choice is / was Northern / Canadian red cedar - but I expect that was partly because that's where they were.
Here in the UK, I've considered Euro oak, Siberian larch, maybe a good grade redwood.
Any ideas please?
I'm currently building a pair using a 10 year old stock of iroko. It's not the easiest wood to work with due to its interlocking grain but it is tough and durable for outdoors.
9E0828FD-A93F-4BA2-819A-7DF7B5585C18.jpegI made this chair out of sapele with brass screws. I finished it with a general finishes product but can’t remember what one. I made it for my father in law about 10 years ago,and when the finish faded somewhat he smeared some sort of varnish on it. Needless to say it doesn’t quite look like this photo anymore. But I’m my opinion,sapele is a good wood for outdoors. Hope this helps.
 
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