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A GREAT HAMMER NEEDED!!

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Anonymous

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i'm trying to source a reliable hammer for general joinery purposes!!

i have been using cheap hammers up until now but i'm fed up with them packing in a few months down the line!

also i've not found one i'm really comfortable with just yet so i want to spend some money on one to see the difference.

its a core tool in my tool box and is used LOADS!!

please help! recommend me a great hammer!

cheers!
 

Scrit

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Hi Matt and welcome!

The hammer you require depends on what you're doing. For general joinery I have a couple of tried and tested Stanley Steelmaster adze eye claw hammers (the one with a steel shaft) - 16oz and 20oz sizes. One of these has survived more than 20 years (8 in the trade plus a couple of house renovations). For framing I use an Estwing solid steel framing hammer - 28oz with a flat ripping claw (they do a 30 anfd 32oz if you are particularly strong). These all have vinyl/rubber handles which makes them great for short period work, but for prolonged nailing you'll need to consider a wooden-handled hammer, preferably with either an ash or hickory handle. In the shop my preference is for Stanley Warrington-pattern hammers in a variety of weights - strip off the varnish and oil the the wood soo it doesn't raise blisters.

Scrt
 

JFC

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Estwing , ive had mine 16 years and it still hits things :lol: I have the one with the leather ringed handle .
 

engineer one

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i have a couple of different types but always pick up my
eastwing, which happens to be the modern design
which sweeps down to the head, it is a claw,
but many traditionalists find it difficult to use.
i just like the balance :lol: :lol: (hammer)
paul
 

WoodPecker

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You can't beat picking up a hammer to see what it feels
like before buying i.e. weight, grip and balance.

If you want a good hammer without spending a daft amount of money have a look at Stanley blue strike, has a steel handle (Never found this a problem - I've built a house with one). They should be available in any good hardware. Don't be put off by the fact that you will probably pick one up for not much more than £10, dam good hammer, and I've had a few rubbish ones.

If you avoid pulling really stubborn nails with a claw hammer a good one will last you a life time. Also buy a nail bar for the stubborn stuff and you won't go wrong.
 
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Anonymous

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You can't beat picking up a hammer to see what it feels
like before buying i.e. weight, grip and balance.

If you want a good hammer without spending a daft amount of money have a look at Stanley blue strike, has a steel handle (Never found this a problem - I've built a house with one).
yeah, i've been for a look and do like the feel of the stanley hammers.

wasn't sure on the steel handle thing though. i don't suppose you wrap or bind the handle in anything to give extra comfort do you?

cheers, matt w
 

Scrit

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mattw":1qmvh8j1 said:
wasn't sure on the steel handle thing though. i don't suppose you wrap or bind the handle in anything to give extra comfort do you?
You don't want to wrap anything round a hammer handle as there is always the risk that your binding can come off and either you or someone else will get injured (by being hit in the face with a flying hammer). The Stanley Steelmasters are pretty good value and certainly last well (for that matter so do the Estwings so beloved of builders) - and one of the advantages of a steel handle is that if you do mis-strike the handle takes being belted against wood, concrete, etc remarkably well, unlike fibreglass or wood which can break. Another good thing is that the heads don't ever loosen or come off (unlike wooden hammers). The downside is that they do transmit more shock back into the hand than a traditional wooden-handled hammer. It all depends if you intend to spend 6 hours a day hammering continuously, day in - day out, or not. I've used them on jobs where they're in use for 4or 5 hours at a stretch (ripping-up and denailing solid flooring) and the only thing I'd say is that your hand sweats a bit more than it would with a wooden hammer. Personally, that's not a problem

Scrit
 

Jake

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There is of course the vinyl/rubber/leather grip on the steel shaft anyway.
 

Taffy Turner

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I have got an Estwing framing hammer with the leather handle which I find very comfortable to use for hours at a time when erecting / repairing fences etc.

This is the third claw hammer that I have bought - the others were rejected as they wern't balanced properly and made my arm ache after a while. The Estwing doesn't have any problems of this nature, although it did make my wallet ache when I bought it! :shock:

Regards

Gary
 
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