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Pete Maddex

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Man removed 3 fingers with a chopsaw on now, really makes you think about safety when the take him to x-ray with his fingers in a bowl.

Pete
 

flying haggis

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that is the sort of thing that never fails to amaze me about our nhs. that sort of accident occurs and the staff just say "ok ,lets get this fixed" and for the surgeons involved they know it is going to be long night but just do it.
 

Cabinetman

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Probably like a lot of us I have a mangled left forefinger. Best of luck to whoever he is. Back in the day things weren’t as clever as they are now so hopefully he will be able to use them again. But chopping three fingers off completely is a bit dire, yuck
 

akirk

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my wife recently was just finishing an 8am -6pm day when a chap came in like this - she finished operating on him at 6am in the morning... what amazes me is how often she can put the fingers back on, and how much functionality she can restore... (she can also put 10 stitches into a vein 1mm across!)

one of her favourite stories was a chap who had retired to pursue his hobby of making guitars, but sadly took fingers off... some time later after the operation and physio, she simply received a photo from him of the guitar he made post op... makes her job worthwhile...
 

Pete Maddex

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They sewed them all back on but his index finger didn't take and had to be amputated, he was cutting coasters at the time.

Pete
 

MikeG.

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My dad cut his index finger off on a table saw back in the 50s. He picked it up out of the sawdust, put it in a bag of ice, wrapped his bleeding hand in a pillow case, and drove himself to hospital. The surgeon took the severed digit from him and dropped it in the bin, then, under local anaesthetic, took a pair of side cutters to the wound to shorten the remaining bone. When he cut it off it ping-ed up into the light and bounced into dad's face. Cutting the bone shorter meant there was then enough skin and flesh to be able to sew it together over the end of the finger. Three stitches later, and clutching a bottle of paracetamol, he drove himself back home.

Are you telling me they do things differently these days?
 

Robbo3

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I new several farm workers, now deceased, who had fingers missing either by cutting them off on a large circular saw or getting them trapped in the tractor driven belts.
 

Concizat

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Back in the 50s, my elder brother was at Agricultural College in the north east of Scotland, and when doing practical work on a local farm, cut his left hand on a circular saw till it was only held on by the thumb. He lost the pinky but the other 3 fingers were save and he eventually got back full use of them. The only good outcome was that it saved him from National Service conscription!!
 

doctor Bob

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Horrific stories, I mangled my thumb, that was bad enough, required plastic surgery and still numb 9 years later but 100% mobility. Makes you very aware of complacency and slipping back into that mode would be very easy.

P.S......... Ruined my chances of playing for England and getting that century at Lords, Mike G ;)
 

novocaine

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An unusual word of warning for you all.
If you do remove an appendage in your goal to make a better coaster, don't "chuck it in a bag of ice". it really Zilch-Wedlock the surgeons off when they have the chance of fixing it scuppered by ice burn.
Wrap it in a non fluffy material, put it in a plastic bag then put it on a bag of frozen peas, then off you pop to your local A&E for you 12 hours of being called a dumb ijit.

anyways, keep it 5x5 please folks.
 

Droogs

Is that chisel shar ... Ow
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It dates from 1926 and is used in radio signal strength and message readability reporting procures as per British Military Radio Telegraphy (voice/Data)/Wireless Telephony (Morse) communications net set up procedures originally published in Army Communications Publication No100 & 126/7 and was adopted by all NATO members as the correct Comms procecures at it's formation as the US had adopted the same rules in order to work with the UK in WW2. I used to teach this stuff
 
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