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1962 Meddings Dril-tru Drill Press (Mk2 9373/LT/II) light restoration

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Fergie 307

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Interesting. When you say a cheap variable voltage supply, do you mean something like this;


I had seen people doing it with phone chargers. When you say to make sure that the rod is the same material - I'm a bit confused. I assume you mean that in a nickel acetate solution you can only use a nickel anode, and in a copper acetate solution you can only use a copper anode? Otherwise you get contamination and the plating won't work.

I imagine that I'll just buy strip nickel/copper so it can be bent over the edge of the jar and the crocodile clips attached to the outside.

When you say 'shrink wrap over the rod so it can be held' - what are you referring to there? Is that to avoid any shocks?

And at 3V, how long would you leave the average part to be coated, so it can be subsequently polished?

Many thanks.
Shrink wrap not to avoid a shock, the power is too low, but does ensure the current stays where you want it rather than being dissipated through you!
 

Fergie 307

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That's much more succinct than my effort :) Yes - 'Tailoring the input' - was what we did but of course this was a full commercial enterprise making gauges and we could control both Amps & Volts (IIRC) to a very high precision. I distinctly remember having to set up some 20BA thread gauges to be chrome plated inside!! the bore on those is 0.34mm and I had to put a wire cathode inside making sure that it didn't touch the thread :(


No correction needed (except to the typo :) ) as far as I can tell - My time in that shop was only about 3 months and I haven't done any plating since but it was a very memorable time.
Shrink wrap not to avoid a shock, the power is too low, but does ensure the current stays where you want it rather than being dissipated through you!
If you buy acommercial brush plating kit then the anode is contaned in a plastic hosing, like a cheap ball point pen. The better ones have screw on tips to take different material ends, or a carbon fibre core which works with anything. I just use a rod of the appropriate material and solder a lead to it with a plug on the end to mate with the + wire. Another thing you can try as a preparation is to put the piece to be plated in a bath of spirit vinegar and a pinch of salt, the salt inmproves electrical conductivity. Then set it up with the item you are preparing connected to + , so your item becomes the anode. This will effectively strip a tiny amount off the surface, taking any invisible surface oxidisation with it. After a couple of minutes take it out and rinse with distilled water, then into your plating tank. I sometimes use this technique on pocket watch cases where it can be very difficult to thoroughly clean the area under the pendant joint. Practice makes perfect and as I say if you get a patchy or sreaky finish that is generally because there is contamination on the surface. To give you an idea i would put watch parts through a watch cleaning solution, then a second wash in pure alcohol. Both times 10 minutes in an ultrasonic cleaner at 30 degrees. Then carry out any remedial work and polishing, then repeat the cleaning process again before plating. Anyone contemplating this with a watch note that you must not normally subject the pallet fork or balance staff to this method of cleaning as the jewels on these components are typically held in with shellac, which will dissolve causing the jewels to fall off, a major PITA!
 

SledDriver

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Polishing should be done BEFORE plating (as Fergie 307 has said) (though some buffing may be done afterward)

The Voltage is not the important value - AMPERAGE and Area being plated are the figures you need to determine 'how long' to obtain a particular thickness.

I've forgotten most of what I learned during my time in the plating shop as an apprentice in the 50's but I do remember that we had to calculate the total surface area and then work out the time needed at what Amps to achieve the specified thickness. I also remember that we were working to extremely high precision - ie. millionths of an inch.

I can't tell you precisely how this relates to - and will give you actual figures for - laying down (say)10µm on to (say) 100mm² but you will see what information you need to find out.
Shrink wrap not to avoid a shock, the power is too low, but does ensure the current stays where you want it rather than being dissipated through you!
Thanks for the input. I've ordered a few bits to have a go. Might try that next week.

Without trying to sound dismissive, I'll likely just try and fudge it and see how I get on. I definitely won't be doing any formulae! I'll get it through trial and error.

I've made some good progress on the drill. The quill was reinserted, and the spring assembly and handle assembly were both fitted (which holds it all in). The finished depth stop and collar were fitted to the quill shaft. I reassembled the base, column, table and head, finally fitting the motor mount and various bolts.

After disassembly and cleaning I reattached the chuck. The various felt gaskets are just stiff craft felt. They only serve to avoid banging painted pieces together.

There were very few issues. All I would say is that I made the column marginally too smooth (or gave it too much oil to prevent rust) which means that you currently have to crank down a bit on the table tightening handle or it has a tendency to slip easily. I won't do anything to remedy it - as the oil gets a little sticky that will go away on its own.

I've got to do the handles (remove the old plating, polish, then attempt to nickel plate). I also haven't tackled the motor yet. Please so far though;

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Fergie 307

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Other option is just to replace the handles. I have an old sealey and just replaced the handles with stainless bar appropriately threaded at either end.
 

SledDriver

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Finally got the motor apart today, and two new rubber sealed bearings ordered so they'll likely never be touched again!

I'm curious as to how best to clean the internals. I'm leaning towards a wipe with some isopropyl alcohol or acetone or something. It doesn't seem that dirty. Even just a damp cloth perhaps? I guess I could buy some contact cleaner like this?


I don't know what the purple stuff is on the rotor.

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I'm also getting ready to rewire the drill, but don't know much about electrics so I'd like some advice.

It's a single phase motor, and the old cabling is 3 core (red/black/green) which I understand to be pre-1977 colours. The rubber insulation is failing so I'm hoping to replace the lot with new cable.

With that in mind, what am I looking for in a cable? I would guess something like this?


Questions;

- I see options of 0.75mm, 1.5mm and 2.5mm. I'll be wiring it into a standard UK plug. What is the proper option?
- There are options of rubber or PVC coatings. Any reason to choose one over the other?
- Is there anything to watch out for when rewiring these things?
 

Phil Pascoe

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2.5mm is large to get into a plug, 1.5mm I'd think better. The dial switch on mine failed so I replaced it with a standard no volt switch - iirc the switch can be wired for three phase so mark the terminals as you disconnect them.
You'll find out anyway. Be careful if you rewire to get the flex out of the way of the column - mine was pinched between the head casting and the column, how it didn't short I don't know. Is there nowhere locally you buy a couple of metres of flex?
 

SledDriver

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2.5mm is large to get into a plug, 1.5mm I'd think better. The dial switch on mine failed so I replaced it with a standard no volt switch - iirc the switch can be wired for three phase so mark the terminals as you disconnect them.
You'll find out anyway. Be careful if you rewire to get the flex out of the way of the column - mine was pinched between the head casting and the column, how it didn't short I don't know. Is there nowhere locally you buy a couple of metres of flex?
Thanks for this. I'll use the 1.5mm. I've already taken the old wiring out and have hopefully taken sufficient photos of where everything went! It worked before I disconnected it all anyway.

I'll be careful of the column, but I think the way it runs on this one means it shouldn't get in the way. I'll run the cable with the head on of the column to avoid any issues.

I really don't know if there's anywhere I can buy the cable by the metre. That one from Screwfix seems to be the cheapest I can find for a shortish length.
 

Fergie 307

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Pre paint wipe. You can buy it at any place that sells car paint, or online. Brilliant for jobs like this, i just put things like this in a big old plastic water tank and blast it with the fluid in a gun on the compressor. Removes all the gunk without damaging anything and leaves no residue.
 

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