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16amp to 13 amp

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denvir

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hello again, If you got a table saw with a 16 amp 3 pin plug on wich is 240v, can you change it to a standard 13 amp plug or is there some plug you can bye or adaptor can some one help please. :lol:
 

DeanN

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I left mine "as is" to avoid warranty issues. Instead, I made an extension cable with a 13amp plug on one end, and a 16amp socket on the other. Sorted.
 

ScouseKev

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No.
Because the saw is designed to draw 16amps on start up, then reduce down to below 13amps.
If you put a 13amp plug on, it will blow the fuse every time you try to start the saw.

You need one of these.
16Asocket.jpg

Its a 16amp socket that you plug your 16amp plug in to.

Once its fitted you will probably notice the lights will go a bit dimmer when you start the saw.

Hope this helps.
Kev
 

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denvir

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hello,thanks for the help, that 16 amp socket do you just wire that in to 2.5m wire wich runs the standard 13amp plug sockets thank you.and my garage has got a two way fuse box in it but the garage is about 15foot from the house ,the wire that runs the garage is just pluged in to a plug socket would the 13 amp fuse in that plug blow would i have to wire it direct form the plug socket.
 

DeanN

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A lot depends on the table saw. Mines a 10" Axminster model, and I've never had a problem with fuses blowing due to it operating on a 13amp circuit.
 

Wildman

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just fitting the 16amp socket to a 2.5 supply does not make it a 16amps supply. It should be wired into the fusebox via a 16 amp fuse and larger cable, 4mm cooker cable will do fine.
 

Hudson Carpentry

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You would be better telling us which saw you have and/or its power requirements. If the running watts is less then 2.9kw and you have the correct type of NCB which will take the start up load then its possible to use a 13amp plug (although the closer to 2.9 you are the more likely the 13mp fuse will blow on start up.

My TS didn't come with a plug, as don't many 16amp rated gear. I knew I had the correct breaker installed and the normal running usage is stated at 2.2kw so I put a 13amp socket on it and its never had an issue.
 

ScouseKev

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Hi again.

The answer is yes.

The saw will blow any 13amps fuses. The fact that the saw comes with a 16amp plug clearly shows that a 13amp plug / fuse is not enough.
The saw has obviously got a fairly powerful motor that needs 16amps of current for the initial start up.

You don't need 4mm cable , 2.5 is fine as long as it goes directly back to the fuse box.

You said the cable feeding the garage is just "plugged in"....again if there are any 13amp fuses in the circuit, it will blow them.
Instead use a 20amp double pole switch and then wire in the 16amp socket.

i went through this whole procedure when i bought a new saw a year a go

If you are unsure then get an electrician to do it
 

RogerS

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ScouseKev":2o8u8rxy said:
....... up.

You don't need 4mm cable , 2.5 is fine as long as it goes directly back to the fuse box.

......t
Yes you do if the cable run is long enough.

What do you mean by 'as long as it goes directly back to the fuse box' ?
 

turner.martin

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Hi,

I'm having a problem that's related to this.

I have a colchester lathe wired into a 13 amp plug. Everything runs fine on it until i try to put it into the highest speed, at which point it trips the fuse every time.

I have tried wiring in a 16 amp socket along with a 1 gang, 13 amp socket into the wall to replace my existing 2 gang, 13 amp socket, but when I turn the power back on at RCD, the new sockets (and also another 2 gang 13 amp socket connected to the same RCD switch) don't work at all.

This is the socket I'm using is a ABB Surface Socket 16A 2P+E 250V 6H IP44 from screwfix.

... and the RCD switch is an MK 230/400v B32

Any ideas how I can get it working?! Do I maybe need a socket with a switch?

Thanks,
Martin T
 

graduate_owner

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My Colchester lathe has a 3 phase 3hp motor and at the moment ( temporary arrangement) it is fed from a 3 HP static converter. It starts up in all speeds except the highest ( converter cuts out) so I think it is excessive load due to the gearing which causes increased current flow on start up. In winter it won't start up in the next speed - more drag with thicker oil? Mine is fed from a 16amp socket and 16 amp MCB.

In your case, the trip could be going because of a similar reason, although a 32amp MCB ( I assume you mean MCB not RCD?) sounds high enough - as I said mine is a 16 amp and doesn't trip off.

You could try changing the MCB for a type C. Basically type B mcbs trip at 3-5 times rated current, so your Colchester may be drawing more than the MCB can cope with on start up in high gear. Type C mcbs will trip at 5-10 times rated current and are more suitable for use in motor circuits. Those figures apply for only a very short time so you will still get circuit protection without the initial tripping. I would definitely not replace the MCB with one of a higher rating.
Also remember that wiring is now covered by building regulations, part P, and strictly speaking any external work should be done by a qualified electrition ( I know many of us ignore that but I thought it best to mention it)

Hope this helps.
 

turner.martin

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Thanks, Some useful stuff there.

But I think my problem is something different. The MCB doesn't actually trip once I change over on to the 16 amp socket, the power doesn't actually run through it in the first place. The very fact that the new sockets are connected seems to stop the power before anything is plugged in and switched on. That's why I'm so confused! And the MCB doesn't trip, making the switch go off; the switch stays in the 'on' position but there is still no power.

Any idea on this?
 

Eric The Viking

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turner.martin":1bwcw9yh said:
Hi,

I'm having a problem that's related to this.

I have a colchester lathe wired into a 13 amp plug. Everything runs fine on it until i try to put it into the highest speed, at which point it trips the fuse every time.

I have tried wiring in a 16 amp socket along with a 1 gang, 13 amp socket into the wall to replace my existing 2 gang, 13 amp socket, but when I turn the power back on at RCD, the new sockets (and also another 2 gang 13 amp socket connected to the same RCD switch) don't work at all.

This is the socket I'm using is a ABB Surface Socket 16A 2P+E 250V 6H IP44 from screwfix.

... and the RCD switch is an MK 230/400v B32

Any ideas how I can get it working?! Do I maybe need a socket with a switch?

Thanks,
Martin T
I don't wish to be rude but...

STOP! : That above is indicative of someone who doesn't know what they're doing. What you have done is probably dangerous - there has certainly been a wiring mistake made, and that alone is enough to cause concern..

I can guess what's wrong, but honestly you need to get a professional in to wire it up properly.

Your 16A socket should be on a separate circuit back to a separate, correctly-sized miniature circuit breaker (MCB) at the fuse box/distribution board, with the correct size of cable. It should NOT be part of any household ring main circuit.

It isn't complex for a qualified electrician; it shouldn't be expensive. For your money you will additionally get a certificate saying it's been done safely.

Leave the circuit switched off. Don't take the risk by doing anything else to it. Get an electrician in.

E.
 
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