16amp single phase table saw

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OxonTurner

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Hi
Need some advice, I have purchased a table saw which has a 16amp plug on it, single phase, to plug into standard plugs can I just use a fly lead converter? They say ideal for camping etc. But no mention of anything else.

Thanks in advance
 

Ttrees

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Hello
Have you read last weeks thread regarding similar?


Tom
 

DBT85

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You can probably plug it in if there is a lead that does it. But it'll probably throw 13a fuses depending on the model.

My 3hp extractor for example can run fine on a 13a plug but starting the damned thing will throw a fuse every 15 goes or so.

There is a reason it's supposed to be on a 16a socket, likely with dedicated 2.5mm going back to the board.
 

Spectric

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If you do not have a 16 amp socket then try it on a 13 amp socket first. My tablesaw runs without issue on a normal 13 amp plug and it would save you having a 16 amp socket fitted.
 

clogs

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note, the higher the amperage the bigger the pins in plugs.....actually it's not the pins that are the prob with transmitting current, it's the sprung receptors in the socket that controls the amperage.....which is why high amperage machines are direct connected to the mains....
having said that.....
Depends on the HP of the motor......there's no decent substitute for a 16amp plug n socket although u can sometimes drive the machine via a 13amp plug with the right kinda RCD.....
remember the more pins in the system the more to go wrong......
ie, adaptors for the UK plug to the Euro socket....
most are down right dangerous for anything above 3 -4 amps....u can use a mains drill or saw but not a buzz welder....
something will melt....
please do the connection properly.....
 

OxonTurner

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Having read the other post I think it would be sensible to fit a dedicated supply, I have air conditioning being fitted this week they are wiring that in, will get them to check my rcd's and run a line.
Thanks for the help.
 

kevinlightfoot

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I run a single phase table saw ,it is 3kw so 4 hp mine has a dedicated circuit with a 20 amp fuse and 4mm cable,mine is a Sedgwick ta 315 and I have no problems with this set up.Hope this helps.
 

mikej460

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I've run a 16amp Kity tablesaw off a standard 13 amp socket and it occasionally tripped the mcb. The issue here is the startup current is more than 13 amps so ostensibly it could trip an mcb in your consumer unit, but it is a spike not a constant so if it is a problem you can swap the mcb for a 'type c' version which should solve the problem. Check what the rating of the existing mcb is that feeds the tablesaw then buy the equivalent 'type c' for example:

Wylex 20A SP Type C MCB | MCBs | Screwfix.com

Ideally you should have a separate consumer unit in your shop and have any 16A machines on there own 20A circuit. If you are not experienced in diy electrical stuff get a sparky to do it for you.
 

Terrytpot

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Seeing this sort of thing on a fairly regular basis now and cant help thinking some people might not have their priorities sorted..most of us are using what we can get within a limited budget on our OWN property...First priority absolutely has to be protection of that property and your family. If thats the case why risk it all by getting new equipment and then trying to use it in a fashion it's not designed therein putting all you hold dear in jeopardy? I recently had a windfall resulting in myself being lucky enough to finally get some equipment I've been wanting for a long time but the first funds I parted with were in the direction of an electrician so that I could be sure it was safe to use that equipment which is all 16A machines being fed from "C" rated breakers.
 

CornishWoodworker

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Just run a single radial supply in 4mm twin and earth to a dedicated suitable socket or hard wire it to a 20A DP switched outlet.
I had a small domestic arc welder which refused to operate on 13A and would always trip the breakers, after installing a single 20A radial , no issues.
 

OldWood

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One of the problems with open fori as this is that there is many times incorrect or over protective advice. The reason this machine is specified as '16A' is the start up current of the motor, and that is why the comments about running it off a 13A socket mention "throwing a fuse every 15 times or so" - the 13A fuse will cope but will degrade due to the over stress with time. So a specific supply is required.

We now come to the question of cable. I refer you to this website for cable rating

www.cable-ratings.co.uk

and this for the voltage drop calculation


and this which says 5% drop which for 230vac is 11.5 volts


So it does depend on how long your cable from the consumer unit to the appliance is. Using TLC's calculator I was surprised how much you could put through a 1mm^2 cable, and it wasn't till I jumped up to 40m cable length that a 2.5mm^2 was required. And go back to remembering that it is only at the very short time of start up - and not even on under load running - will the current to create the 5% mains voltage drop exist.

OxenTurner doesn't give us any information as to where his machine is going to be used, but if it is an outbuilding, you should have a local Consumer Unit with RCD, and dedicated MCB in the house CU. Better perhaps that feed is 4mm, but for instance all my wiring to my garage and workshop went in before I was properly trained as 2.5mm underground and it must be pushing 40m from the house CU. I have no problems with a 3kw table saw, which is on a 5m x 2.5mm^2 dedicated cable from a 20A 'C' breaker in the local CU - a 'C' breaker has a longer time before acting than the normal 'B'.
Rob
 

Lockyear2810

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You could make your own converter lead.
Buy a 16A flying socket and connect it to a short 1.5mm” lead with a standard 13A plug on the end.
You could cut a cable off an old 3kw electric heater if you have one.
The fuse will provide protection for over current.
If you run the saw for more than 15-20mins, check to see if the plug is heating up.
Some (Cheap) sockets don’t provide max current very well and will get warm.
 

Ollie H

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I've just had this issue. 3kW sedgwick take saw wouldn't run off a 13a plug. I used to run it off one with a generator and it was ok, but just pops the fuse on the mains. Put a switched blue socket in on separate rcb and it's fine.
 
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