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125mm/5" Hand Cranked Grinder Wheel Replacement?

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T Kig

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Hi all,
I'm looking at potentially buying a hand-cranked grinder. From what I've read, it's best to buy one that accepts 6"/150mm wheels in order to find easy modern replacement wheels. The ones I've seen where I am (the Netherlands) that are in good shape seem to only accept 5"/125mm wheels, though. in good shape where I am (the Netherlands). I'm struggling to find places/brands that offer wheels in those sizes, and wonder if anybody has any recommendations? Thanks in advance.
 

ED65

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What part of the design of the grinders you can get limits them to only 5" wheels? Most hand-cranked grinders I've seen it would only be the rest and those are often not used these days.

If you do need an in-built rest it's relatively straightforward to fashion a new one that allows space for a larger wheel.
 

T Kig

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That's a fair point. I'm finding it difficult to find much information on hand-cranked grinders, and I guess I don't fully understand them. I think looking at pictures it seems that the only limiting factor would be the tool rest.

Would you recommend then to ditch the in-built and use/make a stand-alone one?
 

Inspector

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I was curious so I looked on eBay and it didn't show any wheels just a lot of the grinders. With the money they want for one I can get a Chinese electric bench grinder at several stores locally. Unless a good one fell in my lap I doubt I will ever have one.

If you look at industrial suppliers that sell grinding wheels they will be able to get high quality wheels in almost any kind of abrasive and hardness. You might have to get bushings to fit the shaft if it is an oddball size. There should be some local to you that you can talk to.

Pete
 

T Kig

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Pete, thanks for your input and I totally understand. My current situation and lack of dedicated workspace means I'm thinking of creative (and potentially silly) solutions. Since a grinder is not really feasible for me at the moment, I'm trying to decide between these hand-cranked grinders or something like a coarse SiC stone. I've been using sandpaper for primary bevel grinding, but am getting tired of having to buy new sheets.

I had a look ebay too, and I must say the examples that pop-up do look pretty bad. There are two options where I live (the Netherlands) that are quite cheap and look better than those. Still, I've heard quite mixed comments on hand-grinders - many people seem to hate them, some people love them. I thought I could give it a go, but then had issues figuring out if I could easily replace the wheels.

Maybe I shouldn't bother, and just go with the coarse Sic/India stone. I wonder if anybody here has had any good luck with hand grinders?
 

AndyT

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Here are some pictures of mine . It's a Niagara 441, made in Manchester. As you can see, there's plenty of space round the wheel so the size isn't critical.

And if your wheel was a bit big, it would be easy enough to make a new, longer tool rest.








As for how useful it is... I do use it sometimes, but I also have a basic electric one set up ready, so mostly use that on the rare occasions that I need to grind anything.
 

T Kig

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Hi Andy, thanks for the pictures, that is helpful. And yes, I think given the option between the two I'm sure the hand cranked doesn't get much use. I appreciate all the feedback from more experienced people here, thanks.
 

ED65

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T Kig":1spk0x95 said:
Since a grinder is not really feasible for me at the moment
Space issue the main thing? Or is noise a factor too? If it's just space Lidl or Aldi do a small grinder that has a very small footprint and while it's no full-size grinder it definitely does the job, and obviously it's not expensive.

T Kig":1spk0x95 said:
I'm trying to decide between these hand-cranked grinders or something like a coarse SiC stone. I've been using sandpaper for primary bevel grinding, but am getting tired of having to buy new sheets.
If you have to do it by hand I recommend trying a very coarse diamond plate, 150 or coarser. You won't believe how quickly they abrade steel and from AliExpress one will only cost you around €4. Despite this they last a long time; even with regular use you should expect one to last 5-7 years and it could easily last longer.

How often do you need to do this BTW? I've only reset a primary three or four times in the last five years, the main reason I own an ultra-coarse plate is for tool restorations.
 

Vann

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I use a hand cranked grinder for all my chisel and plane blade grinding. It uses a 6" wheel. I have an 8" wheel powered grinder, but with the hand grinder I never have to worry about overheating the iron/blade. They take a bit of getting used to, but once you've got that sorted they're great.

I don't know what brand mine is (I think it may be German). I also have a spare grinder for the day when this one dies. The spare is a "Mole" brand. I bought a Lee Valley toolrest for mine.

Here's Alf (formerly of this site) demonstrating a hand grinder.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8CPbZg8PGo

I'm fairly sure hers is a "Mole" grinder too.

Cheers, Vann.
 

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