110v tools in home workshop

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Roboboyo

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Hi Guys,

anyone using 110v tools in a home workshop?

I know 110v tools are usually used on jobsites but would they work as good as 240v for workshop use? (i have a transformer)
 

Bingy man

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Yes 100% - I do a lot of work in the garden due to small workshop and most of my tools are 110. I place the transformer just inside the flat and run a short 110 lead to my planer or t/saw etc . If you have an electrical contact with 110 it’s not life threatening as a 240v contact can be fatal . a lot of my work is also outside so again 110 v . As for performance no problems, I was once told 110 volt tools last longer but not sure if this is true ..
 

Roboboyo

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Yes 100% - I do a lot of work in the garden due to small workshop and most of my tools are 110. I place the transformer just inside the flat and run a short 110 lead to my planer or t/saw etc . If you have an electrical contact with 110 it’s not life threatening as a 240v contact can be fatal . a lot of my work is also outside so again 110 v . As for performance no problems, I was once told 110 volt tools last longer but not sure if this is true ..
Thanks for the reply,
Some good info.
To be honest the reason I’m looking at going 110v is largely to do with price (they seem a bit cheaper) but as you say, the health and safety factor is a big plus 🙂
 

imageel

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I too have workshop tools that are 110v and used these for years without issues. My go-to corded drill is a Metabo 1kw 110v and gets used quite frequently mounted on a stiff cast pillar press and that allows safe and controlled cutting quite large and deep cores in metal. My other most used 110v tool is a large 9 inch grinder - that will cause the 1.5kw site transformer to cut out if loaded up, however I have a much more powerful bench mounted 2.5kw tranny that I can use in those circumstances.
Most of the 110v tooling I have were acquired in sales where they seemed to be discounted more heavily than 240v stuff, and given I don't do much site work the safety aspect is of less a concern for me.
 

Roboboyo

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I too have workshop tools that are 110v and used these for years without issues. My go-to corded drill is a Metabo 1kw 110v and gets used quite frequently mounted on a stiff cast pillar press and that allows safe and controlled cutting quite large and deep cores in metal. My other most used 110v tool is a large 9 inch grinder - that will cause the 1.5kw site transformer to cut out if loaded up, however I have a much more powerful bench mounted 2.5kw tranny that I can use in those circumstances.
Most of the 110v tooling I have were acquired in sales where they seemed to be discounted more heavily than 240v stuff, and given I don't do much site work the safety aspect is of less a concern for me.
Thanks for the reply. What press do you mount your metabo drill on exactly?
 

Phil Pascoe

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I have read here and heard from numerous people that 110v is more reliable. I bought a new DeWalt sander for a silly price not realising it was 110v, so bought a transformer. It didn't work out at any more than a 230v version would have cost anyway. I then saw a 110v Hitachi sms for £100 - I think it was only there the week after I first saw it because it wasn't 230v - so bought that, not realising it had a transformer with it. Suits me fine as I need to use both in different settings so it'll save carting one around.
Second hand stuff tends to be cheaper as many site workers are are going for battery stuff as technology moves on. Second hand 110v leads tend to be cheap as well.
Seeing your last post I use a Bosch S7 drill stand with a 43mm collar drill in it. Brilliant, but it's not a lightweight - it was £70 30+ years ago.
 

imageel

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It's an old Record Power pillar designed for morticing so fairly robust and whilst not in the same league as a Meddings or similar pillar drill is good enough for my needs - I have a dedicated morticer so removed the lower collar from the press to extend its travel.
The Metabo drill is very powerful, I can't find its rated torque however in low gear and slow speed it will rip your arm off if the drill bit/socket bites!!
 

Garden Shed Projects

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110v kit is only bought by professionals who work on site so the market for cheap DIY kit at 110v isn't there. I would imagine stuff for sale second hand mustn't be getting a lot of use, e.g. making money. In short there is high probability of buying professional tools that have seen little use.
Just a theory but definitely worth a look if you are in the market for 2nd hand power tools
 

Spectric

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I will always aim to buy 110 where possible because my logic is that the OEM will know that a 110 tool is more likely to be abused on site and therefore has to be more durable. I can also say that the only tools I have experienced burnt out motors with have been 230 V ones. There is also cost, I recently purchased a Trend T10 router from FFX and the 110 version saved me around £100. Be careful with used 110 tools and avoid if they look well used, you can get a bargain if a person has moved onto cordless but there is also the risk they have been abused on a site. Then safety, 110 is used because it is safer and you cannot get fried by 55 volts even standing in a puddle, an unknown damaged cable on a 230 volt tool could kill but not on the 110 so another thing to consider especially in a workshop enviroment.
 
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Sideways

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I've had good deals from buying 110v tools (eg brand new Metabo angle grinder £50, 16mm wolf rear handle drill) and still own a couple, but sold most of them off as carrying a transformer when I wanted to use them away from home was just a little too inconvenient.
110v tools have higher currents and consequently thicker copper windings. Maybe the extra copper helps them tolerate short overloads a little better.
Also, on jobsites, 110V tools are often going to be powered from a generator or a shared transformer via one or several long extension cables. If anything, the supply voltage at the tool is likely to be low so the tool won't be over driven.
 

Sideways

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And if you do need to travel with them, look at the carrol & meynell portable transformers and their clones. They are small and dense. Quite high power ratings for something so small when used for 15-20 minutes at a time.
 

Linwoodjoinery

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Not jumping on the thread but I’ve got as new hardly used 110v jigsaw and circular saw for sale along with planer (well used but still in good working order) and an SDS as new Bosch drill for sale in the for sale section if you’re interested in any just give me a shout.

 

Tony51

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I. Still have the Wolf 110v drill I bought in 1972. It still works,but is now retired. I use the Elu 110 v drills instead,along with Bosch hammer drill , jig saw. Makita reciprocating saw, disc cutters 9 inch and four inch, Elu hammer SDS drill etc. Collected over forty five years in building services. Remember to turn off the transformer.
Tony
 

croft36

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Hi Guys,

anyone using 110v tools in a home workshop?

I know 110v tools are usually used on jobsites but would they work as good as 240v for workshop use? (i have a transformer)
I use a 110v circular saw but then had it out of a skip! It was ex hire company, only needed new carbon brushes, still going strong after 30+ years! 110v is safer voltage to work with hence it’s use on site but now being replaced by cordless!?
 
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