110v or 240v?

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nosuchhounds

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Apart from the need for a transformer are there any differences in performance between a 110v and 240v? 110v usually come up cheaper new
 

Doug71

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I have heard reports that the Festool 110v stuff has less power than the 240v equivalent but never used it myself, don't know if it's the same for other brands.
 

clogs

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Practically makes no difference....there are a few odd tools that are down on HP.....
I have loads'a 110v gear from a prev life.....all work well so no fear of changing them.....
Although 110v stuff is now going the way of the Dodo with these excellent battery tools now...
I believe some work sites will only allow battery tools now....with the odd exception....
 

nosuchhounds

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I was looking at the makita 110v thicknesser. It will only be used in my workshop
 

gog64

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I still use some old 110v tools from when I was doing site work years ago. Never found any difference in power. I wouldn’t buy one specifically for a workshop use as lugging about a heavy transformer is a pita.
 

Ttrees

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It'll be fine. All our lunchbox planers and even bigger run on 110V. Makita makes decent planers so if it is a good deal get it. 😉

Pete
I only got schooled recently on the Canadian forum by suggesting someone consider a 3 phase 3hp bandsaw in conjunction with a VFD, rather than a wee curve cutter.
Folks mentioned that they were limited to less amperage than what it would take to run a bandsaw of that size, even though my 24" 3 phase machine w/VFD runs fine on startup/cutting on the household plug.
 

TRITON

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I had no idea they came in 110 or 240.
198967.jpg
Makes you wonder where the power lead goes.

Second thoughts, not sure I want to know the answer to that.... :oops: :oops:
 

Inspector

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I only got schooled recently on the Canadian forum by suggesting someone consider a 3 phase 3hp bandsaw in conjunction with a VFD, rather than a wee curve cutter.
Folks mentioned that they were limited to less amperage than what it would take to run a bandsaw of that size, even though my 24" 3 phase machine w/VFD runs fine on startup/cutting on the household plug.

You can do it with a 220V single phase to 220V Delta three phase but not from 110V. I have a 4K VFD for a 5hp motor that will run off the 220V single phase. I have 20A, 30A and 40A 220v circuits so there would be ample power for a bandsaw like you describe as long as it can be Delta wound.

Pete
 

JobandKnock

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I have heard reports that the Festool 110v stuff has less power than the 240v equivalent but never used it myself, don't know if it's the same for other brands.
I haven't experienced that with the Kapex KS120, OF1000e or OF2200e routers (I.ve used all 3 in 230 volt and I used to own a 230 volt OF2200e - now I'm on site all the time I'm 110 volt only) Never tried any of the others in 230 volt, so I can't say. The main problem you have with 110 volt is making sure you have a big enough transformer - for example I wouldn't run my Kapex on a 3kVA box (I have a 5kVA for it) and anything else where you need to run a vacuum as well automatically puts you in the same area unless you want to risk cooking a motor. The other thing is that it is inadvisable to run 110 volt kit through undersize or multiple extension cables for the same reason as it is always a good idea to have an oversized transformer

I believe some work sites will only allow battery tools now....with the odd exception....
Sorry, but I keep hearing this from people who don't seem to work on sites, or at least not any more. Is it just wishful thinking, like the comments about 230 volt tools being "legal"? There are a large number of tools where are nowhere near being able to run battery only - think the big 2kW hot air guns that roofers and floorers use, cement mixers, compressors or site lighting (i.e. festoons on a site where you may have several hundred individual lamps). The biggest plus about going cordless, apart from getting away from the flexes, is that you no longer need to get a PAT test on everything on site every 3 months
 
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Doug71

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I haven't experienced that with the Kapex KS120, OF1000e or OF2200e routers (I.ve used all 3 in 230 volt and I used to own a 230 volt OF2200e - now I'm on site all the time I'm 110 volt only) Never tried any of the others in 230 volt, so I can't say.

I think it was mainly the TS55 that people moaned about, Festool might have got it sorted now.
 

heimlaga

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Plenty of nice 110 volt stuff was left behind or auctioned off by the American army at the end of the war. A number of makers of small transformers popped up.
Most of those machines are worn out by now......... I really see no reason to go back.
 

JobandKnock

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Slightly different situation in the UK and Ireland, @heimlaga - for site work on controlled construction sites (which can also include work in shopping malls which are live, hotels, etc) the vast majority of larger contractors require you to either use 110 volt tools or cordless tools. The Health & Safety Executive enforce this.
 

Spectric

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110 volt site equipment has been around for ever, it was just accepted that you don't bring 230 volt tools onto sites. There is no reason for any 110 volt tools to be less powerful than their 230 volt equivalents, the manufacturer knows the 110 volt stuff will be worked hard and from my experience over many years the 110 volt gear has lasted better than the 230 volt stuff, my explanation is that the OEM knows where and how it will be used so ensures robustness. As for cordless, I have a 110 volt Te72 Hilti drill that is very old, second hand when I picked it up in the eighties but still works great, how many people think a similar cordless would have lasted as long and given that level of performance, by the way no clutch so drill snags and you rotate.
 

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