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By sirocosm
#1332371
banjerbill wrote:Her use of the unguarded table saw frightened me to death. I had to stop watching.


I am surprised she kept the riving knife.
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By Benchwayze
#1343596
Typical American, 'Just make sure you keep your hands clear of the blade'!!!

I don't know about being in love! (I became indifferent when I reached 80! Er not really... Lol!) However, yes she is quite good ; she made a lovely, black-walnut stand to house a digital piano. Tasty design. I'll be glad when I can 'belly up to the bench' properly again!

John (hammer)
By D_W
#1343663
I know one person who is insistent about using an unguarded saw - I think because he saw Norm do it for years.

Guess where he's from (he lives here in the states)? England. He moved over here and insists he doesn't have a tolerance for a guard, but is otherwise much like you guys (critical of Americans in some ways). Mechanical Engineering manager - I don't understand his lack of fear.

As a "born here" american, I have a TS now with no guard, but with a splitter. It hangs on the wall. I use it only once in a while with some flat stock and only with push sticks. Why am I not more american? Simple - my English friend introduced me to his saw with no guard on it and I caught a kickback from a thin panel.

One of the reasons that I enjoy hand tools so much (as someone smart enough to stay away from the business end of a chisel) is that the sides of chisel and now and again, a small handsaw are the only things that get a little bit of my fingers.

That aside, while it's more interesting for most to watch someone making something (and the gimmick of using scrap is always a false promise of getting something for nothing - but that plays well in these videos), all of these little jigged boxes look kind of common and gross compared to a simple dovetailed candle box. They look less like a hand made good and more like a manufactured good.

https://www.antiques-atlas.com/antique/ ... /as223a392
By voyager
#1349777
On the H&S subject,
i will often remove my table saw guard if its in the way, likewise with my mill, however i was an apprentice engineer in a time when a good clip round the ear or worse was the result of doing something stupid, working in and around complex machinery always got a serious lecture on being aware of your surroundings, failure to pay attention was either a week making tea or steering a broom around the workshop for a few days, i guess what i'm saying is that it was a way of learning H&S that became ingrained very quickly and has stayed with me for over 40yrs.
now however i do worry at "education via youtube" or a very polite application of correction onsite for fear of hurting someones feelings.
in a few years i forsee many 9 fingered young woodworkers.
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By Trevanion
#1349816
voyager wrote: however i was an apprentice engineer in a time when a good clip round the ear or worse was the result of doing something stupid, working in and around complex machinery always got a serious lecture on being aware of your surroundings, failure to pay attention was either a week making tea or steering a broom around the workshop for a few days, i guess what i'm saying is that it was a way of learning H&S that became ingrained very quickly and has stayed with me for over 40yrs.


I remember quite well being told "Do not bleed on my machines, you'll make them rust and we don't want that" :lol:
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By transatlantic
#1349904
Thoughts on spraying router bits with WD-40 Dry Lube (or any other dry lube)?

Good idea?
By voyager
#1350069
I remember quite well being told "Do not bleed on my machines, you'll make them rust and we don't want that"


yup, had that one a few times,
By Sideways
#1358484
Well I'm not in love, but I have daughters so I always like to see the girls beating us at our own game...
Here's Ashley Harwood - woodturner from South Carolina.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRtT6kZ_C4g

Watch the first 5 minutes if that's all you watch to see an example of a full on production turning job against the clock. I'm not qualified to comment on the difficulty of a job like that but maintaining accuracy and consistency across a big batch of work when you are in a hurry can't be easy.
The channel is modern day marketing - engagement with social media to get her message out there - but I think it's pretty well done and it looks to be working as her classes are selling !