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By dh7892
#456633
I did ask for the duty planning officer but they were on the other phone so I guess that I got unlucky.

I'll try again. If that means making an appointment, then I'll do it.

On further thinking though, I'd like to keep the ridge below 2.5m anyway if I can (save blocking out any more light to the veg patch).

What's the reslistic minimum pitch I can get away with?
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By mrbingley
#531280
Looking at that planning portal site. It's 2.5 metres height to the "eaves", not the ridge.

HTH
Chris.
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By Lons
#531293
My local planning and building control depts are very helpful. :? Bear in mind that they are under strict guidelines from their employers to remain non commital and that they deal very often with applicants whose final plans bear little resemblance to their initial enquiries.

Just another perspective on the subject however :-

Be very careful how you describe the intended use of the "shed" and my advice would be never to say you intend to use it as a workshop or to install machinery of any kind.
Even hand and minor power tools can be veiwed with suspicion by some authorities due to a potential noise nuisance consideration.

Just my 2 pennerth seen several times first hand :cry:

cheers

Bob
By Pvt_Ryan
#531317
To be honest.. I'd just do it. You can always do what the travelling community are so fond of doing and apply for the permission retrospectively.

I reckon as long as you don't water off the neighbours you'll be fine, at the end of the day unless someone is actively hunting for something to get you for they aren't going to know you don't have permission.

Certainly my parents have a garage loft conversion my dad did himself and he hasn't declared it, and I'm pretty sure he did all of the wiring to his garage himself.

BR & PP are retarded, the council put up a 10' fence out side my parents house to block off access to a field due to complains about youths using it for drinking. A neighbour on the other side had trees (trees were 20'+) along side said fence decided to cut them down. He then checked for PP to erect a fence. He was told the fence could be no more than 4'. So youths could enter the his garden climb the fence thereby bypassing the 10' council fence. In the end he ignored the council put up a 8' fence on the field side and then dropped to a 4' fence on the road side (a total of 7' long on that side).
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By sometimewoodworker
#531347
mrbingley wrote:Looking at that planning portal site. It's 2.5 metres height to the "eaves", not the ridge.

HTH
Chris.


Yes except :?

Under new regulations that came into effect on 1 October 2008 outbuildings are considered to be permitted development, not needing planning permission, subject to the following limits and conditions:

* No outbuilding on land forward of a wall forming the principal elevation.
* Outbuildings and garages to be single storey with maximum eaves height of 2.5 metres and maximum overall height of four metres with a dual pitched roof or three metres for any other roof.
* Maximum height of 2.5 metres in the case of a building, enclosure or container within two metres of a boundary of the curtilage of the dwellinghouse.

* No verandas, balconies or raised platforms.
* No more than half the area of land around the "original house"* would be covered by additions or other buildings.
* In National Parks, the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and World Heritage Sites the maximum area to be covered by buildings, enclosures, containers and pools more than 20 metres from house to be limited to 10 square metres.
* On designated land* buildings, enclosures, containers and pools at the side of properties will require planning permission.
* Within the curtilage of listed buildings any outbuilding will require planning permission.



http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/england/public/buildingwork/projects/workcommonoutbuildings/
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By promhandicam
#531439
dh7892 wrote:I've just moved house and all my tools etc are currently in the loft doing no one any good. So, I want to build a shed to work in. . . .


One question - are you self employed? If so, and any connection can be made between your work and your shed then you may need PP even if the size is within permitted limits. I know one person at least who posts here had problems along these lines not so very long ago - not sure if it was resolved but he has recently started to rent his own premises.

Steve
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By Lons
#531513
Pvt_Ryan wrote:To be honest.. I'd just do it. You can always do what the travelling community are so fond of doing and apply for the permission retrospectively.

I reckon as long as you don't pineapple off the neighbours you'll be fine, at the end of the day unless someone is actively hunting for something to get you for they aren't going to know you don't have permission.

.


I'd do the same in your situation. planning have much bigger fish to catch than a lowly shed errector :lol:

Certainly my parents have a garage loft conversion my dad did himself and he hasn't declared it, and I'm pretty sure he did all of the wiring to his garage himself


Your parents (or their beneficiaries) are very likely to have problems when it comes to selling the property without the relevant permissions and cirtificates of approval to show the purchasers solicitors IMO :?

cheers

Bob
By Pvt_Ryan
#531542
I don't think it will as I would imagine all he needs to do is tear up the boards (all screwed down) and/or remove the ladder and say it was just to lower the ceiling, then just disconnect the wiring going out..

But as far as I am aware there are no plans to sell the house..
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By Lons
#531585
Pvt_Ryan wrote:I don't think it will as I would imagine all he needs to do is tear up the boards (all screwed down) and/or remove the ladder and say it was just to lower the ceiling, then just disconnect the wiring going out..

But as far as I am aware there are no plans to sell the house..


Ah right - not a proper conversion then so no probs. :idea:

There are a lot of people using loft space as "rooms", joists not reinforced, no proper stair access etc.

Not something I'd do personally as It isn't safe, especially in the event of fire IMO but fully understand why so many householders go down that route.

cheers

bob
By Jake
#531589
It won't cause problems, and will be perfectly saleable without ripping anything out. It just won't add any real value to the house as it will be sold as "boarded out storage space". Very common.
By Marchy
#548298
I must admit my experience has been similar to Big Shots in terms of non-commital planning officers. There's a uesful article here (Do I need planning permission for my shed?), which is more recent than the DIY source but basicaly a recap of the planning portal.

I hate to say it but it tempting to do first and ask later - so long as you're not going to p~ss off your neighbours. My neighbour had a long but narrow garden (like mine) and built a large 'shed' at the bottom which was totally within the planning rights but due to the narrowness of the gardens totally overshadowed my garden.
By paul_david_thomas
#554098
I built a shed a few months ago. It was squeezed into a back garden of a house I rent out. It's measured 7m x 3.2m x 2.5m It had a pretty large roof overhang all the way around. Due to a little error on my behalf the she was 100mm to tall. I was dobbed in by some one and the planning enforcement officer came round. They were fine. I said, IF they wanted I would prop the shed roof on acro's, cut 100mm out of the shed and drop the roof back down. She went away and in the end said she would allow it. I then said I would not paint it dell-boy luminous yellow :-)
By billybuntus
#555785
The links in this thread appear to be out of date. I'm heading towards drunk and looking to buy a new house and the prereq is that I can have a workshop in the garden.....so before I commit to an offer I'm having a peek at this..

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permis ... /miniguide
By Pond
#558259
billybuntus wrote:The links in this thread appear to be out of date. I'm heading towards drunk and looking to buy a new house and the prereq is that I can have a workshop in the garden.....so before I commit to an offer I'm having a peek at this..

http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/permis ... /miniguide


Having been through this shed building bo11oks myself, I would say you can read planning portals and 'permitted development' rights until you are blue in the face, but the only way to be sure is to speak to a planning officer at your local council, they will come out to the site and advise.

And I can tell you from bitter experience, it pays to be sure.

It's amazing how people who you thought were reasonable and nice neighbours become NIMBYs over the smallest thing. :evil: