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By BigShot
#403441
Mike, I certainly wouldn't expect a planning officer to give any guarantees, but in my experience a lot of them won't even say whether they would object to something "in principle" or not even when they have a really clear description.

That includes officers in a number of Manchester councils (Tameside, Manchester, Bury, Salford, Stockport, Bolton) and also Preston and one or two others. Bury has such a reputation I frequently have new clients asking if they are really as bad as they've heard from friends.

I've had good experience with "pre-planning advice" where the client is definitely going ahead with a job and wants to get the council involved before getting quotes from contractors (I only work in the design side of the job) so gets us in to do the drawings, submit and deal with the planning officer.

The problem really arises when you're asking a question which could make the difference between a job being possible or not.

The most recent example was a dormer loft conversion on a low-ridge roof, client asked about having a front and rear dormer meeting above the existing ridge, no neighbours had any similar work done.

The flat refusal to give even confirm if there was an objection in-principle to that kind of work means a client has to choose between doing nothing, or getting plans drawn up and making an application, waiting weeks for a response - and if refused they have wasted hundreds of pounds.

In the example I gave I suspect they wouldn't pass the plans, but the refusal to even be drawn a bit is just annoying.

Many times in the past I've made a call to find out if there were any objections "in principle", even going as far as a rough sketch at times, being given the usual response and after making the application being told about 2 days later there's no way in hell it'll be passed for in-principle reasons x, y and z (all reasons they'd been asked about before but said either nothing, or no "in principle" objection).

Yea, some of them are fine, but for the most part they are a bit of a nightmare around here. Some of them are just flat out stupid and have absolutely NO eye for what looks good on a building.

Some of our local officers have turned a large portion of this area into an eyesore thanks to their absolutely idiotic interpretation of a particular "guideline". Under the new permitted development rules they have been overruled, but it doesn't make the jobs they changed to their personal preference look any better. The amount of kooky looking oddities on houses that have been put on to please planners or get around their really petty requirments is shockingly large.

Exceptions to the above made for any actual human beings who work in planning departments, of course. There just aren't many around here.
By ferdinand
#406918
Two potentially useful sources of information:

1 - The Forums over at the gardenlaw.co.uk website are very good on points of law and not upsetting your neighbours.

2 - There's often good general advice on websites of organisation dealing with "Garden Offices" and chalet-style rooms, without mentioning any particular company. Clearly people on ukworkshop are capable of building their own, but the FAQ sections can be useful.

Ferdinand
User avatar
By big soft moose
#416232
okay so ive read the thread and i'm now more confused than when i started (not difficult in my case)

can somebody clarify , if i want to put up a shed (and i'm talking about one of those 6x4 efforts you get in B&Q etc - the purpose being to store swimbos bike and gardening tools and other rubbish that keeps making its way back into the 'shop) can it be closer than 1m to the boundary without PP or not.

I'm fairly sure that ellie next door wont care anyway but we are tennants and the letting agency will probably want everything done to the letter.
By BigMac
#416460
Assuming you aren't in a conservation area, area of natural beauty etc. then there shouldn't be a problem as its well under the building regs size limit and should be under 2.5m tall.
By Dibs-h
#416464
big soft moose wrote:okay so ive read the thread and i'm now more confused than when i started (not difficult in my case)

can somebody clarify , if i want to put up a shed (and i'm talking about one of those 6x4 efforts you get in B&Q etc - the purpose being to store swimbos bike and gardening tools and other rubbish that keeps making its way back into the 'shop) can it be closer than 1m to the boundary without PP or not.

I'm fairly sure that ellie next door wont care anyway but we are tennants and the letting agency will probably want everything done to the letter.


I always took it that PP had nothing to do with the 1m thing - that is\was more from a BR perspective. To be honest as it's one of those 6'x4' things - I'd just put it where you fancy (as long as the neighbours don't have an issue). There must be 1000's of those up and down the country - right up to the boundary.
User avatar
By devonwoody
#431025
I want to attach a new shed(for lathe) built in timber to the side of my detached bungalow, would I ever get planning permission?

Reading posts above, it states a building in combustible materials is not possible,
User avatar
By devonwoody
#431168
devonwoody wrote:I want to attach a new shed(for lathe) built in timber to the side of my detached bungalow, would I ever get planning permission?

Reading posts above, it states a building in combustible materials is not possible,


Rang the building regs. office this afternoon and things are not as bad as first thought, he said if its ground level and only a garden outbuilding building regs. need not apply.
The planning office were a bit more cunning, they said write in and we will give you a form to fill in.
I pushed and got an answer eventually that if its a garden outbuilding and met the usual criteria (my words) I dont need planning permission.
So I might have a turning shed shortly for the big lathe I am getting :)
By ninjabika
#442961
hi

don't know if this is of any use to any one, if you click on any part of the house or garden or out buildings, it gives you links to any rellevent information you might need


http://www.planningportal.gov.uk/upload ... guide.html



martin

p.s you need to click launch the guide at the bottom to open it up as full screen
Last edited by ninjabika on 02 Jan 2010, 15:19, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By devonwoody
#442972
thats novel and interesting. thanks.
By dh7892
#450812
I've sent my local planning dept an email with my outline intentions and asked them whatI have to do next. They responded saying that they needed to know my address so they could "forward my enquiry on". I'm not sure quite what that's about but I hope it's not a bad sign.
User avatar
By MikeG.
#450826
No, that will be the receptionist needing to work out which Planning Officer to give your drawing to. Most councils divide the work up on an area basis so that one Planning Officer gets to know his patch very well.

Mike
By dh7892
#450850
Good to know.

I've nearly finished my sketchup design and I'll start a new topic with it when I'm ready to invite comments.
By dh7892
#456609
Still hadn't heard anything from the planning office so I phoned them.

I told them that, at this stage, I just wanted to clarify if I would need planning consent. I told her that I thought that I would because I suspect that the ridge height would be above 2.5m. She asked if it was within 2m of the boundary to which I replied that the shed is but the ridge might not be ! I asked if it was the ridge or the actual shed that counts (I suspect it's the shed but I thought I'd ask).

She told me that she can't confirm anything that complicated and that I'd need to apply for some legal document (can't remember the name) that would say if I needed permission. This will cost £75! So I have to pay £75 to confirm that I will need to apply to building permission (which will then cost me more). This is very annoying. I was hoping that they would just know their own rules and be able to tell me.

I think I'm going to try to make sure my design keeps the ridge height below 2.5m in order to avoid the need for planning permission.
User avatar
By MikeG.
#456616
Make an appointment with a Planning Officer, take a drawing of what you propose and he will tell you within 1 minute whether you need PP or not. You have only been talking to receptionists. Most councils at the least operate a duty planning officer system, sometimes mornings only, who will give this sort of advice quickly.

Mike
By TrimTheKing
#456618
What mike says. Also, our planning office have 'surgeries' where you can drop in, take a (metaphorical) ticket and sit down for a chat with an officer who will tell you exactly what you need to do (not whether it will be allowed, but what process to follow).