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By sammy.se
#1337318
Yojevol wrote:My German friend, Monika, learnt her basic English in the post-war years when she had Canadian soldiers billeted in her house. She thus spoke with a Canadian accent and biscuits were cookies. Later in life she decided to study English and become an English teacher. Whilst at university her tutor was infuriated by her Canadian accent and gave her individual pronunciation training to get overcome it. She now speaks with a normal (to us) Gerrman English accent but she can put on the Canadian when she wants to.
We were talking about accents one day, saying that we can usually tell which country a speaker is from by their accent. She agreed, it's just the same for us. I then asked her what is about an English accent that makes it distinctive. Her answer was immediate - "You slur your words"

Brian
Is she saying everyone is drunk all the time?

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
By Nigel Burden
#1337328
phil.p wrote:It's not difficult - plurals don't take apostrophes, possessives and contractions do.
The misplaced ones are known as greengrocers' apostrophes, as the commonest place to find them is in greengrocers' windows - best apple's, pear's etc. here.
I'm one of those poor souls who had to learn what gerunds, pluperfect passive subjuctives and other horrible thing were. :D


I'm having to learn it now. I'll be honest, I've largely forgotten most of those horrible things.

A friend of mine, a retired schoolteacher, gets quite hung up about the weather presenters when they present a picture sent in by a weather watcher, or is it a weatherwatcher. :?
It's apparently in the way they say it.

Nigel.
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By whiskywill
#1337358
Sideways wrote:Could'a been Moon Unit .... :D


On the radio recently, I heard somebody "famous", though I didn't catch who, refer to his two sons Charlie Ocean and River Joe. Presumably they are a bit wet but, hopefully, not stupid like their parents.
By AES
#1337362
No sammy.se, Jojevol's friend Monika isn't suggesting that all English speakers are constantly drunk!

My (Swiss) wife put much the same idea in a rather more descriptive way - "Most English speakers seem to have eaten and already digested half of every 2nd word before it leaves their mouths as a sound".

She further compounded her insult when we visited UK once on holiday. While visiting Scotland (I think that's somewhere up above Watford!) she claimed that all the local speakers were much easier for her to understand than people who originate from "darn sowf ". Comparing my own "impeccable" accent with all the "och aye dern noos" etc, etc, one hears up there, I was even more offended as, of course, I originate from "darn sowf". :D Thank goodness we didn't go to Geordie-land too .
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By Bm101
#1337379
phil.p wrote:Oh, come on .......... get off of your high horse, like.

Funny enough, talking of horses.
Correct use of language is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off his horse and .... Well.....
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By Phil Pascoe
#1337394
whiskywill wrote:
Sideways wrote:Could'a been Moon Unit .... :D


On the radio recently, I heard somebody "famous", though I didn't catch who, refer to his two sons Charlie Ocean and River Joe. Presumably they are a bit wet but, hopefully, not stupid like their parents.


How's about
Poppy Honey Rosie, Daisy Boo Pamela, Petal Blossom Rainbow, Buddy Bear Maurice and River Rocket Blue Dallas?
That really takes some beating for child cruelty. :D
By Student
#1337415
On the subject of accents, my MiL and her family escaped Belgium in 1940 as did quite a number of her relatives, uncles, aunts and the like. They all ended up in different parts of GB. My MiL and her parents and sisters ended up in Rothesay on the Isle of Bute. Some ended up in Dewsbury, some in Wales and some in Yorkshire. They all had to learn English during their 5 years of enforced absence although in the case of my MiL and a cousin in Dewsbury they married and stayed in England. My FiL always said that, when he went back to Belgium and they had a family reunion, it was quite amusing to hear all the different accents when they spoke to him, his Flemish being virtually non-existent. My MiL was often mistaken for a Scot when talking on the phone.
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By MikeG.
#1337431
rafezetter wrote:......swear in almost a dozen different languages including......afrikaans.......


The most expressive language on the planet when it comes to swearing. There isn't the slightest doubt when an Afrikaaner is swearing, even if you don't understand a single word of the language. Ek praat 'n bietjie afrikaans, maar verstaan nogal baie.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1337432
In the early '70s my family had a property in Portugal. A dictatorship at the time, you had trouble getting phone messages out without the exchange at Setubal cutting you off. The lady who looked after many of the houses when they were empty was Belgian, and spoke Flemish ...... and Portuguese, English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and some Russian and Arabic. She was a clever lady, a highly decorated war hero who had met Dr. Mengele and lived to tell the tale. If a message was really important she would speak in say Spanish and ring her sister in Belgium. As soon as the call got through she would revert to Flemish, and as they didn't have Flemish translator at the telephone exchange it was minutes before they realised they couldn't understand her and cut her off, her sister then forwarding the message to the person for whom it was intended. By the bye. :D
By Yojevol
#1337436
Dances With Wolves
We watched this yesterday having recorded it off Channel 5. If you remember it's the story of Kevin Costner's John Dunbar and his acceptance into a Sioux indian tribe. The film is notable for the Indian dialogue used throughout with subtitles.
The odd thing about making that movie is that they had a woman teaching the actors the Lakota language, but Lakota has a male-gendered language and a female-gendered version.
When a bunch of present day Lakota guys went to see the film they had a real good laugh because all the cast, including the macho braves and Dunbar, were speaking the ladies version in the very feminine way!

In our ignorance we thoroughly enjoyed the film having not seen it in 30 years.

Brain
By John Brown
#1337442
phil.p wrote:It's not difficult - plurals don't take apostrophes, possessives and contractions do.
The misplaced ones are known as greengrocers' apostrophes, as the commonest place to find them is in greengrocers' windows - best apple's, pear's etc. here.
I'm one of those poor souls who had to learn what gerunds, pluperfect passive subjuctives and other horrible thing were. :D

I know the real rules. I wonder about the rules other people have in their heads, when they add apostrophes to some plurals, but not all.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1337452
Yojevol wrote:Dances With Wolves
In our ignorance we thoroughly enjoyed the film having not seen it in 30 years.
Brain


If it were the most dreadful film ever made, it would still be worth watching for the music. :D
By rafezetter
#1337460
phil.p wrote:
whiskywill wrote:
Sideways wrote:Could'a been Moon Unit .... :D


On the radio recently, I heard somebody "famous", though I didn't catch who, refer to his two sons Charlie Ocean and River Joe. Presumably they are a bit wet but, hopefully, not stupid like their parents.


How's about
Poppy Honey Rosie, Daisy Boo Pamela, Petal Blossom Rainbow, Buddy Bear Maurice and River Rocket Blue Dallas?
That really takes some beating for child cruelty. :D


You don't need to do that for child cruelty, you just have to name your son after a family WWI hero (with a not unusual name) you idolised as a child, then tell him he isn't worthy of the name. Repeatedly.

But I get your point - names can be dangerous, and might be why so many artists (music mostly) have a stage persona and an everyday name, and also probably behind the ethos of the first nations habit of naming people after deeds or regularly displayed behaviours, an "earned" name will often relect the person far more than a "given" name. - So don't be guy from the joke about familial relations with a sheep :) - though on reflection being named after deeds might put some people off doing the socially damaging kind.

My above confession has oft lead me to consider changing it to distance myself from those memories which is obviously still a sore point.
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By Trainee neophyte
#1337464
rafezetter wrote:[

But I get your point - names can be dangerous, and might be why so many artists (music mostly) have a stage persona and an everyday name, and also probably behind the ethos of the first nations habit of naming people after deeds or regularly displayed behaviours, an "earned" name will often relect the person far more than a "given" name. - So don't be guy from the joke about familial relations with a sheep :) - though on reflection being named after deeds might put some people off doing the socially damaging kind.


Greece has a tradition of naming people after their grandparents. However, this causes much friction in the family, because - which grandparent? Never ask a mother the name of her new baby, because there will have been months, if not years, of internecine warfare over which side of the family wins the honour of getting the child named. I was at a lunch where I brought up this interesting cultural anomaly, and was then subjected to a half-hour fight between the couple opposite over what to name the baby. Eventually someone pointed out that they weren't even married yet, let alone pregnant.

The other (and more salient) point to this is that in a small village, where everyone is related (!) there is a tendency for everyone to be called Giorgos, or Dimitris. Everyone, because they all had the same great-great-grandfather. So to specify which one you are taking about, you get given a nickname, which you earn at a young age and it tends to stick. So my neighbour, Vasilis, is called "Boulis", which means a small child who hides behind his mother's skirts (almost the same as "shy", but not quite). He is sixty now, but still known as the cowardly child. Another neighbour is Photis the Tightwad, another would be Christos the Whinger. The best part of this, being foreigners, is we had no idea what these slightly esoteric words meant when we arrived, and genuinely thought it was their surnames. Much consternation ensued because these names tend not to be used to people's faces, because they are mostly (but not always) disparaging. How we laugh now, years after the embarrassing incidents (plural)...

(We apparently have earned the sobriquet "The Tall Couple" - nice to know we have something other than "that weird foreign family on the hill" to distinguish us from all the other foreigners who don't live in the village, because there aren't any).

Today is Tsiknopempti, so we will be assisting the above-mentioned neighbours in barbequing 300 souvlaki and 30 kilos of pork belly. And its raining, so a proper English barbecue. Marvelous traditions in this country.