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By transatlantic
#1337123
whiskywill wrote:
sunnybob wrote:It constantly amazes me how many adults cant pronounce thirty thousand, or even something as simple as three.


And he used to be a Maths teacher. :roll:


I assume you mean people that would say 'firty fousand' or 'free'?

In some cases it's mispronunciation (something they could change), in others it's more of a speech impediment (something they probably can't).
By Yojevol
#1337125
sunnybob wrote:It constantly amazes me how many adults cant pronounce thirty thousand, or even something as simple as three.
It constantly amazes me how many adults can't put in an apostrophe when needed or are we on the slippery cant
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By whiskywill
#1337126
sunnybob wrote:It constantly amazes me how many adults cant pronounce thirty thousand, or even something as simple as three.
(hammer) (hammer) (hammer) (hammer) :evil:
And that includes one of the chasers who is supposed to be in the top 5 of the worlds best quizzers.


And he used to be a Maths teacher. :roll:
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By Phil Pascoe
#1337233
Yojevol wrote:
sunnybob wrote:It constantly amazes me how many adults cant pronounce thirty thousand, or even something as simple as three.
It constantly amazes me how many adults can't put in an apostrophe when needed or are we on the slippery cant


And you can't beat a slippery cant. :D
By John Brown
#1337254
I have no desire to judge those who didn't have the benefit of a classical education, but I have to confess that I can spend literally minutes trying to work out what invisible rule people are applying when abusing apostrophes for pluralisation. All or none I can understand.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1337257
It's not difficult - plurals don't take apostrophes, possessives and contractions do.
The misplaced ones are known as greengrocers' apostrophes, as the commonest place to find them is in greengrocers' windows - best apple's, pear's etc. here.
I'm one of those poor souls who had to learn what gerunds, pluperfect passive subjuctives and other horrible thing were. :D
By rafezetter
#1337261
My party trick is to say the name of that volcano in Iceland that blew up and caused the reporters (and air traffic) so much trouble - so I HAD to learn how to say it, just... because.

Eyjafjallajökull

See? easy.

(but I really can say it properly :lol: and also swear in almost a dozen different languages including chinese, afrikaans, and arabic.)

Handy for swearing in front of ppl who are none the wiser.
By rafezetter
#1337262
Lons wrote:
Bm101 wrote:Say it in Geordie Andy. Easy.
Hwa waaay pet. :wink:


Not allowed to call anyone pet these days, bloody nitpickers! :roll:

We have an Indian acquaintance who named her daughter something unpronounceable, Hermiani or something like that I think, anyway sounded to me like "howsmahinny" which is what I called her and it stuck. :wink:


haha in a similar vein an Indian friend called his newborn daughter something that even other Indians had trouble with, 3 months later he's had to change it!

I also had a schoolfriend when I was about 12 who was Lithuanian by parentage but was born and raised in the UK who couldn't properly pronouce his OWN Lithuanian name, and he had to think hard how to spell it - "just call me Mat one t" haha I've not thought about that kid for over 30 years, odd the things you remember...

Oh and we had a Vietnamese girl living here who's boyfriends name was either a girls name or a boys name depending on the pronouciation - we had that conversation because I do try to get peoples names right and apparently I was pronouncing it the girls way - I couldn't tell the difference, but clearly the vietnamese can and he said he was quite used to it.

Honestly, why do people do that to thier kids?
By Andy Kev.
#1337275
transatlantic wrote:[
I assume you mean people that would say 'firty fousand' or 'free'?

In some cases it's mispronunciation (something they could change), in others it's more of a speech impediment (something they probably can't).


It's "mispronunciation" that leads to differences between languages, dialects and accents.

Consider a word which is different in at least three languages: Dorf in German, Thorpe in English and if I remember rightly, there's a variant in Dutch. Did a German start mispronouncing the initial "th" and the "p" on the end or was it the other way around.

Consider also German Tal, Norwegian Dal and English Dale. A much better word for the thing between hills than the probably Norman-French valley.

So fifty fousand or if you're from London even fifty fahzand doesn't look so wrong. In Salford kids would often be corrected for saying "bockles" and "keckles" instead of bottles and kettles. Is it "wrong" to drop the "t" in the middle "bo'l" "keh'l"? Hardly. That glottal stop appears to be something we got from the Vikings. Danish is full of it.

As you can imagine, I'm reluctant to criticise such things as being wrong. I tend to get upset with sloppiness, e.g. "like", "you know" etc.
By Yojevol
#1337314
My German friend, Monika, learnt her basic English in the post-war years when she had Canadian soldiers billeted in her house. She thus spoke with a Canadian accent and biscuits were cookies. Later in life she decided to study English and become an English teacher. Whilst at university her tutor was infuriated by her Canadian accent and gave her individual pronunciation training to get overcome it. She now speaks with a normal (to us) Gerrman English accent but she can put on the Canadian when she wants to.
We were talking about accents one day, saying that we can usually tell which country a speaker is from by their accent. She agreed, it's just the same for us. I then asked her what is about an English accent that makes it distinctive. Her answer was immediate - "You slur your words"

Brian
By Geoff_S
#1337317
Back in 1975 I had my first review with my manager at the bank I was a junior in. He very helpfully advised me that if I wanted to get on in the bank then I would need to take elocution lessons.

I didn't, I left and pursued another direction where my pronunciation of things like "south" weren't an issue. Innit.