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By Phil Pascoe
#1337475
Trainee neophyte wrote:Greece has a tradition of naming people after their grandparents ...


This used to be expected in Cornwall, which is why so many people (especially the elderly) are known by their second forename. My wife worked in a bank (nearly forty years ago, it's not quite so common now) and used to get frustrated trying to find a customer with a common surname - .g. Arthur Smith - and after going through the alphabet to find he was actually William Arthur.
The first forename was the name of the grandparent. My father was called William George, known as George, his father was Arthur Harold, known as Harold. My other grandfather as called Frederick Charles, known as Charles. My mother and I escaped this, but both my children are known by their second forenames.
By Andy Kev.
#1337487
AES wrote:No sammy.se, Jojevol's friend Monika isn't suggesting that all English speakers are constantly drunk!

My (Swiss) wife put much the same idea in a rather more descriptive way - "Most English speakers seem to have eaten and already digested half of every 2nd word before it leaves their mouths as a sound".

She further compounded her insult when we visited UK once on holiday. While visiting Scotland (I think that's somewhere up above Watford!) she claimed that all the local speakers were much easier for her to understand than people who originate from "darn sowf ". Comparing my own "impeccable" accent with all the "och aye dern noos" etc, etc, one hears up there, I was even more offended as, of course, I originate from "darn sowf". :D Thank goodness we didn't go to Geordie-land too .

I can see what your wife is getting at. I teach English to Germans and I've come to the view that whereas German is like a stone which has been cut and polished with clear edges, English is like a pebble that has become smoothly rounded off after years on the beach. That said if your wife thinks we've digested half of our words, don't let her hear Danish. I thought we were bad for not saying half of what was written down. Compared to the Danes, we're not even gifted amateurs! Danish does sound very nice, though.
By AES
#1337493
Good description of German, Andy (MOST of the time anyway)! You DO need to sound every letter in the word. E.g. "Ker nee"

Don't know about Danish though, but can't be any "worse" than Geordie though. Or can it? :D
By Andy Kev.
#1337494
Oh yes it can!

Here's a link to the Danish trailer of the film of one of my favourite thriller books:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hgS7L8Y2fpE

The subtitles are not related to what is being said on the screen.* I reckon it's easier to decode written Danish than it is spoken Danish.

*I've just watched it again and it turns out that some of them are or they might be in another Scandinavian language e.g. Swedish.
Last edited by Andy Kev. on 20 Feb 2020, 11:51, edited 1 time in total.
By Irish Rover
#1337497
Vann wrote:On one of my first visits to Christchurch (NZ) I had difficulty with the very English names on some of their streets. I was told that Leicester St was not pronounced Lee-Chester, but Lester. Worcester St was not pronounced War-Chester, but Wooster. And Gloucester St was not pronounced Glou-Chester, but Glosster. So when asked where I was staying I told them it was a hotel in Manster St - but they said it was pronounced Manchester :roll:

Go figure.

Cheers, Vann.


There is nothing to "go figure"
You are introducing the problem yourself by putting an h where it doesn't belong in Leicester, Worcester and Gloucester and removing the h from Manchester, where it does belong.
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By Trainee neophyte
#1337550
Irish Rover wrote:
Vann wrote:On one of my first visits to Christchurch (NZ) I had difficulty with the very English names on some of their streets. I was told that Leicester St was not pronounced Lee-Chester, but Lester. Worcester St was not pronounced War-Chester, but Wooster. And Gloucester St was not pronounced Glou-Chester, but Glosster. So when asked where I was staying I told them it was a hotel in Manster St - but they said it was pronounced Manchester :roll:

Go figure.

Cheers, Vann.


There is nothing to "go figure"
You are introducing the problem yourself by putting an h where it doesn't belong in Leicester, Worcester and Gloucester and removing the h from Manchester, where it does belong.


Have we played the "ough" game yet? How many different ways to pronounce the same letters: plough, through, cough, chough, etc. I won't go through them all, and I won't look them all up, because that would be cheating. I think there might be 10 different pronunciations - can we get them all, and can we get to 11? Google not allowed!
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By whiskywill
#1337553
Trainee neophyte wrote:Have we played the "ough" game yet? How many different ways to pronounce the same letters: plough, through, cough, chough, etc. I won't go through them all, and I won't look them all up, because that would be cheating. I think there might be 10 different pronunciations - can we get them all, and can we get to 11? Google not allowed!


No Google? My first thought is that is tough, though I will try. How much "dough" are you offering?
By AES
#1337554
If you want "games" like tough, etc, "T n", then look no further than the "Dearest Creature in creation" .pdf file that I posted back on, I think, P4 of this thread. I bet neither you (nor anyone else) can get through those 2+ pages without at least a few stumbles!
By Irish Rover
#1337557
I'll have a go as I've thought his through and I think I have given it a thorough enough examination. I may not succeed but I will plough on regardless as, barring any hiccoughs, I need to go to Burscough shortly if I can manage to cough up the exorbitant train fare!
If not, I'll just have to go to Slough again :|
By Nigel Burden
#1337592
phil.p wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:Greece has a tradition of naming people after their grandparents ...


This used to be expected in Cornwall, which is why so many people (especially the elderly) are known by their second forename. My wife worked in a bank (nearly forty years ago, it's not quite so common now) and used to get frustrated trying to find a customer with a common surname - .g. Arthur Smith - and after going through the alphabet to find he was actually William Arthur.
The first forename was the name of the grandparent. My father was called William George, known as George, his father was Arthur Harold, known as Harold. My other grandfather as called Frederick Charles, known as Charles. My mother and I escaped this, but both my children are known by their second forenames.


Whilst researching family history I found out that my mothers eldest sister who I knew as Aunt Joan was actually named Florence Joanna. This made sense of why her son in law called her Flossei.

Nigel.
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By Cinimod
#1338059
Trainee neophyte wrote:My West country favourite would have to be Woolfardisworthy.


My wife's parents used to live there and I could never work out how it was said. The locals pronounce it Woolzery........dom