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By ColeyS1
#812484
Doing a recent job and a customer specified using farrow and ball paint. Think its the first time ive used it and hopefully won't have to use it again. The easiest way to describe it is its a bit like antivandal paint - it never seems to dry thoroughly enough to rub down between coats
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I tried leaving it around 3 -4 days between coats and it still clogs up sandpaper like a goodun.
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I used farrow and ball colour on my bench but got dulux to mix it, it seemed to level out alot better and was defo easier to denib between coats.
Is it just the colours that make this paint appealing ?
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I've given the one on the left 2 top coats and it still needs another cause it looks a bit patchy :mad:
Pee'd right off using it to be honest
Coley

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By Cottonwood
#812492
I have a few tins of f & B eggshell oil but once they are used up I wont get no more. It is very fiddly to use, needs cutting with turpentine otherwise its too clumpy and stiff. It starts to dry very fast which means it doesnt work out nicely and easily, even with a decent quality brush (I used purdey's). Personally I havent had any trouble with it staying soft for more than a day except recently on a table frame. But I suspect that was because I painted it out in the workshop. It was still soft and tacky after 2 days, no good to apply 2nd coat. But when I brought it indoors into a warmer atmosphere it recovered fine. I have had the best results using zinsserr 123 primer on new wood. I painted some kitchen doors (using a small roller) whichh worked fine. That was over a polyuthrane ikeaa finish.
I have tried craig & rose acryliic eggshell, way easier to use, covers superbly, like smooth creamy yoghurt. Some nice colours too.
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By ColeyS1
#812493
That does make an interesting read. Do you think they might have made a massive quantity and somehow forgot to add the bit that makes it dry ? Took the best part of 4 hours and loads of sandpaper to get it ready to what i thought would have been the last coat.
Having stuff mixed would be the best option but what if they wanted something else made to match a few years down the line.


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By RogerS
#812656
Excellent read, thanks, Roger and sums up my own experience of F&B. I do also know that if the paint is put on too thick then it forms a skin on the surface and this stops the underlying paint drying out. I am not a great fan of F&B since they went all eco-friendly and understand that other manufacturers (Morrells?) can mix up to match F&B colours.

Zinsser primer is the DB's. I won't use anything else now.
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By Peter Sefton
#812673
We are using some F&B at the moment on some cabinets I just finished making. The outside of the cabinets are finishing fine but the interior which is a red colour Radicchio No 96 is just not drying and the finish is very poor. I do like the colours they make but have also had problems before on some windows I made, the paint looked great but only lasted 1 or 2 years max before needing major repainting. Will be seriously thinking before using it again.
Peter
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By ColeyS1
#812690
The inside of the cabinets must look identical in colour to these then ;)
Its a shame cause it was quite an enjoyable job before the painting began.
A guy came in the shop and wanted to borrow a length of 4x2. He touched the edge of the bookcase so gently with the end ( didn't even notice he did it ) and when I went to look I noticed 4 inchs of the edge completely back to the primer colour. I dread to think how it might look a few years down the line. Hopefully it can be carried in without causing any damage :|

When I was going through sandpaper after sandpaper denibbing, for some strange reason I kept on thinking to get some talcum powder to sprinkle on the sandpaper first. Have I completely dreamt that :?

Coley

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By Peter Sefton
#812713
I have no tried talc on the paper but I will mention it to the painter tomorrow, I am sure he is not looking forward to coming back after the weekend to tacky paint. It does already look knocked about.
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By ColeyS1
#812783
I thought I'd read it somewhere but may have dreamt it :D can I be cheeky and ask for a bit more info on the cupboard that's painted on the inside ? Sounds interesting ;)

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By bugbear
#812810
ColeyS1 wrote:Doing a recent job and a customer specified using farrow and ball paint.


Colour men to the middle classes...

Lots of sensible people buy their colour chart, and get the local Dulux centre to mix it up :lol: :lol: :lol:

BugBear
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By Peter Sefton
#813066
ColeyS1 wrote:I thought I'd read it somewhere but may have dreamt it :D can I be cheeky and ask for a bit more info on the cupboard that's painted on the inside ? Sounds interesting ;)

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Sorry it's not that interesting red on the inside and a green on the outside looks better than it sounds.
Cheers Peter
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By Peter Sefton
#813068
bugbear wrote:
ColeyS1 wrote:Doing a recent job and a customer specified using farrow and ball paint.


Colour men to the middle classes...

Lots of sensible people buy their colour chart, and get the local Dulux centre to mix it up :lol: :lol: :lol:

BugBear



I have had the local guys mix up Dulux to F&B ral colours, I think Dulux is a better paint but they just don't look the same :!: much is the pity :(
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By ColeyS1
#813094
Peter Sefton wrote:
Sorry it's not that interesting red on the inside and a green on the outside looks better than it sounds.
Cheers Peter

Sounds interesting ;) I made a wardrobe for home and wanted ash coloured mdf on the inside but stained mdf on the outside. It really made me scratch my head trying to figure out how to stop the stain colouring the bits I wanted leaving natural colour. I was thinking your painter may have had some tricks up his sleeve where the two colours meet :geek:
I'm trying to learn spraying and find im spending as much time thinking about how im gonna spray the thing and assembling it as I am making it :roll:

Coley

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By Sgian Dubh
#813165
ColeyS1 wrote: wanted ash coloured mdf on the inside but stained mdf on the outside. It really made me scratch my head trying to figure out how to stop the stain colouring the bits I wanted leaving natural colour.
I'm trying to learn spraying and find im spending as much time thinking about how im gonna spray the thing and assembling it as I am making it

A job that's ideal for a spray gun. Mask off the bits you want natural ensuring the edge or corner where the break is to occur is masked off with masking tape firmly pressed down.

Mix some spirit dye with lacquer thinner, or alcohol, and fill your spray gun. Choke down the air pressure a bit and mist the dye on. Don't get the surface too wet so that the dye flashes off quickly-- this prevents the colour bleeding under the edge of the masking tape. Keep building up the colour until you get the result you want. After that you can remove the masking and apply your clear coats. The finish on the front of this cabinet was achieved using a similar technique to what I've just described. Slainte.

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