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By bugbear
#814971
mind_the_goat wrote: Even two samples that look the same under one light source may look completely different under another.


It's called metamerism

BugBear (who does colour printing technology)
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By ColeyS1
#815107
Bookcases delivered today and customer very happy ;)

I took the farrow and ball sample colour in and had some paint scanned and mixed with dulux. 1 coat of waterbased quick dry, and one of oil based dulux eggshell and it covered pretty good ! Rubbed down the next day with 400 grit, no sticky cloggyuppy mess and a second topcoat and all was done. The colour dulux matched it to was 'lacca' now in my opinion the paint they mixed looked a darn good match to the little colour sample from the farrow and ball brochure..........the thing is, there paint doesn't seem to match there own colour brochure ! I wasn't sure if I was imagining it so took a sample of proper wood raddichio paint to be scanned- if everything was consistent it should have came up with the same 'lacca' dulux offering - it didn't ! It then offered 3 dulux alternatives. I finally got her to rescan the little paper farrow and ball sample and it still came back with ' lacca' thats evidence enough for me to say the colour you end up with might not be the same as the one on the card.
Image
The block of wood near the bottom is the f & b paint- the small square im holding is the f&b sample, and the top board is the dulux paint that was matched to the sample square.
This day in age when monitors and printers can be callibrated together, I find it fairly poor that something so important as buying paint should be such hard work.

So if I get a customer in future who asks for farrow and ball, I'll buy the smallest tin of there paint, paint it on some wood, then get it scanned. I'll admit the finish won't be quite the same but altleast it will dry properly with minimum of fuss and will no doubt be much more durable.
If we get pushed for a more authentic heritage paint I'll try anything else but not farrow and ball again- it was hassle from start to finish.
Coley
Edit: Not sure if it's mentioned in any of my previous posts but I did use the recommended f&b primer so shouldn't have been any compatibility issues
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By bugbear
#815220
But that means, if a customer chooses a color from the F&B brochure AND you use "genuine" F&B paint, the customer won't get the colour they've chosen!

So...

Should you match the Dulux to the brochure (from which the customer made his/her selection) or to the paint (which is the "real thing", but the customer has never seen)?

BugBear
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By ColeyS1
#815227
Guess it'll have to be explained. I'll do a neater sample of the colours so they can see the difference themselves. It'd be sooooooooooo much easier if the farrow and ball sample matched there paint, and the bloody stuff dried !!!! :roll: :lol:
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Just spotted my red bristled dusting brush. Anyone would think I used it to paint them, not for dusting off after 2-3 days between coats :P

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By Drudgeon
#815829
But i also bet that if you got the Dulux colour swab for the colour you eventually used, that it probably wouldn't be an exact match to the end product either, it really is very frustrating trying to get colours right.

At the end of the day, if you explain everything to the customer from day1, then they cannot claim to not have what they asked for, the other issue is whether or not the customer would have to pay a slightly higher cost for using actual F&B rather than a colour match in Dulux/Leyland etc to take into account the problem encountered in using F&B, but that will be down to personal choice.

F&B colours really are stunning, and they really do have an edge that your Dulux/Leyland etc trade paints just do not have, I'm lead to believe that this is down to them using better quality ingredients in the paint.

Whatever it may be, let's just hope that F&B develop the product into a more useable paint that we can all use again without the drying issues, unfortunately I don't think you will ever get a WB (hand applied) finish that matches an oil based finish, but we need to get used to it because it is the way of the future.
By Drudgeon
#815830
But i also bet that if you got the Dulux colour swab for the colour you eventually used, that it probably wouldn't be an exact match to the end product either, it really is very frustrating trying to get colours right.

At the end of the day, if you explain everything to the customer from day1, then they cannot claim to not have what they asked for, the other issue is whether or not the customer would have to pay a slightly higher cost for using actual F&B rather than a colour match in Dulux/Leyland etc to take into account the problem encountered in using F&B, but that will be down to personal choice.

F&B colours really are stunning, and they really do have an edge that your Dulux/Leyland etc trade paints just do not have, I'm lead to believe that this is down to them using better quality ingredients in the paint.

Whatever it may be, let's just hope that F&B develop the product into a more useable paint that we can all use again without the drying issues, unfortunately I don't think you will ever get a WB (hand applied) finish that matches an oil based finish, but we need to get used to it because it is the way of the future.
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By Peter Sefton
#816009
The painter completed the two cabinets I was making mid last week, i fitted them up on friday ready for Sarah to show them off to her friends on Saturday. When the grand unveiling happened the bloody doors stuck! F&B struck again - the painted doors had glued themselves to the never drying door stops. i now understand what the abbreviation F&B stand for :!:
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By tekno.mage
#822640
mind_the_goat wrote:"metamerism"

I bet it's rare that you get to slip that word into a conversation :-)


Unless you are talking about matching colours :-) Having said that, the last time I used metamerism in a conversation with a customer, she had to ask me what it meant.