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By Steliz
#1330723
You're right Mike, I was using you're design as a base for mine and I was also going to have the same leg/top arrangement as yours but I changed it when I realised how much wood I would need and it never crossed my mind to lower the M&Ts. Every day is a school day and I have learned something new and I'll know better next time.
As for going forward, I will make new legs. It's not so much about having any Walnut available but more to do with how much I have left over for other projects for myself. The arrangement I have is to make a coffee table as 'payment' for the left over timber and I'm happy with that.
The recipient of this table is an older couple with one grandchild (6 yo) and I think it will be in a fairly safe environment but I wouldn't be happy if it started to get wobbly even if it was years later. I want to do it right so that I can feel good about it and not worry whether it will fail due to a poor design.
By samhay
#1330729
Do you have room to add pegs to the problem joints?
The tenons are quite deep (vertically), so there may be room for a couple of pegs through each. This would help with racking stregth.
If the tenons are long enough - difficult to tell from the photos - this would give similar strength to a bridle joint, which one might consider up to the job.
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By MikeG.
#1330736
Steliz wrote:....... I will make new legs.........


That's the right solution. The reason I asked about the depth of the mortices is that it is perfectly fair enough to have a haunch at the top of the joint. This can be straight or tapered, but can be really quite shallow and still effective. It's job is to prevent the apron cupping. So when you set out the new joints how about a haunch for the top 35 to 50mm?
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By Chris Knight
#1330748
European walnut will lighten in colour considerably if/when exposed to the sun or strong daylight, so you might want to consider this before committing to a finishing scheme.
By Steliz
#1330784
I expect that a coffee table probably wouldn't have too much exposure to the sun but for the finish I was intending to use a hard wax oil as I managed to find some in a local shop. I have tested it on a scrap and it looks nice.

So, while I'm processing the wood for another set of legs I'd like to get some input on the new mortice shape before I commit chisel to wood.
Here is the existing rear rail to right side rail mortices and, going by a previous post, I have indicated in white the top third which should be removed. Actually, it is only 30mm (from 110mm) from the top edge as I am concerned that I will only have 25mm of 30mm deep mortice left. I hope that makes sense.
Rail tenons.jpg
this picture is upside down!

Not sure I understand correctly Mike, are you suggesting leaving a haunch where I have indicated the material is to be removed on the side rail.
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By woodbloke66
#1332479
Chris Knight wrote:European walnut will lighten in colour considerably if/when exposed to the sun or strong daylight, so you might want to consider this before committing to a finishing scheme.

Agreed Chris. A couple of years ago I went round an Elizabethan stately home close to Salisbury, where in one of the upstairs rooms there were a number of very decent antique pieces in English Walnut that were displayed directly under a large fanlight. I had to take a second look just to try and identify the timber as it was so pale. Where they should have been a lustrous, richly polished brown they almost took on the appearance of pine. Not quite that bad, but enough for me to do a 'double take' - Rob
By Steliz
#1333437
Current update -

Following the leg issue I have made some new legs, completed the drawer front frame and glued the top boards together using dowels.

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-1tPXArCDzjI.jpg


and here it is planed

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-QS0ogFHbtlcZ.jpg


cut to final dimensions with a bevel and sanded and with the first coat of hardwax oil

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-8pPHawm0cV5FC2.jpg


Once sanded, I gave the legs and rails a coat of hardwax oil to make the glue clean up easier and glued up the end sections. After that dried I put the whole frame together.

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-ZO841nidqDox.jpg


The top is getting a daily coat of hardwax oil. How many is enough? I thought 5, I recall hearing that somewhere. To be honest, it looked great after 1! How many days should it be allowed to dry before I give it to it's new owner?

Meanwhile, I've been installing the drawer frame structure. It is half lapped (glued and screwed) at the back and glued up mortice and tenons at the front and glued at the sides.

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-cWEVkyW0WaPKWYfA.jpg

imgonline-com-ua-CompressToSize-Gy4Jg3OnijQAxRN.jpg


Just the guides to put in and then it's on the drawers which will be dovetailed.
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By MikeG.
#1333442
Steliz wrote:....... How many days should it be allowed to dry before I give it to it's new owner?......


The day after they've paid for it, I reckon. :lol:
Last edited by MikeG. on 30 Jan 2020, 19:17, edited 1 time in total.
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By MikeG.
#1333481
Ah yes, I remember.

Anyway, it's looking great. Just a tip....think about the placement of your buttons and how you are going to get a screw driver to them. There is often an issue with drawer runners getting in the way. If they do, not much of a drawer runner actually is in contact with the drawer, and it is perfectly possible to drill a big hole through the part that isn't under the drawer through which you can stick a screwdriver. But sort it now before you are too committed.
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By woodbloke66
#1333720
It's a personal thing, but i detest the use of sapwood in any project; the first thing I do when I get hold of a board(s) of English Walnut (amongst others) is to rip off every conceivable bit of sap showing. I stored a prime board of 50mm thick, 2m long walnut in the 'shop a few years ago where I foolishly left a small amount of sap in one corner. Some time later, I casually hoiked the board out whilst looking for something else and the sap was FULL of worm. It was immediately cut off, burnt and the remaining heartwood smothered in woodworm killer. Fortunately I got to it in time and the rest of the board is now fine - Rob

Edit - apologies, I mentioned this on p1 of this thread.
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By bp122
#1333721
Great looking table there.
Well done.

As a novice who is toddling away at making small wooden gifts to people and a rather ambitious couple of projects (wall hung bedside tables and two part coffee table) coming up, I am impressed and quite inspired by your undertaking.

I am hooked into this W.I.P and can't wait to see the end result.

Best regards
bp122
By Steliz
#1333745
Rob, I understand your reasoning for binning sapwood but it is a luxury most woodworkers don't have. I would have struggled to find enough wood to make this table in the entire log if I had stripped off all the sapwood so, what should I do? Double my material costs or carry on and hope that there are no woodworm?

bp122, thanks for the positive comments, I'm working on the drawers now and I'll post pics of the completed table in the next couple of days.
By Steliz
#1333752
MikeG. wrote:Just a tip....think about the placement of your buttons and how you are going to get a screw driver to them. There is often an issue with drawer runners getting in the way.


Mike, thanks for that tip, you're absolutely right. Once I'd got the drawer frame finished I checked and, even using my stubby screwdriver, I won't be able to access the button screws on either of the side rails! I had already done the slots but it wouldn't have made any difference as the access is the same all along the side rails so, a couple of holes for a screwdriver will be required. :wink: