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By autojumbled
#1250433
MikeG. wrote:
autojumbled wrote:Oh yeah, I definitely want to retain the external appearance. That's the easy but I reckon ....it's the stuff underneath that worries me!.......


Seriously, don't worry. You'll be fine with those buildings. If I lived closer I'd pop over and have a look with you, for the price of a cup of tea (and cake of course). Second best is the internet, this forum, and some good photos.


Well if you're ever in the Forest on a caravaning holiday or something - let me know! :mrgreen:
By autojumbled
#1259336
Not much in the way of updates but I just wanted to share a couple more pictures with you.

A couple of the floor from the front section of the barn (I believe originally a cart store). Appears to be brick laid across the whole floor in here. Also appears to be the same construction in the stables end as well, albeit at a different level.

Barn Interior 1.jpg


Can also see the brick course here too with the sole plate (if you can call it that!) - this is the same throughout the entire building. This i think, is where I need the most help in figuring out what to do with it - is it usable as-is? or should I replace the brick courses?!

Barn Interior 6.jpg


Most of the interior is lined with DPM and has done a great job over the years over preventing any water ingress. I was expecting to find wet timber behind but overall its very dry throughout.

Barn Interior 2.jpg

Barn Interior 3.jpg


and a couple of the roof timbers, again....all dry :)

Barn Interior 4.jpg

Barn Interior 5.jpg


The front section is all emptied out of rubbish now and I just had to double check that I was going to be able to use it as my intended garage (with workshop area in the stables end) - there's a buckets of room to get a car in and move around in there - consider myself enthused!

barn 7.jpg
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By MikeG.
#1259358
Great stuff. I imagine those bricks are just laid on sand, or direct onto the soil.

The most important job you can do now is to get the ground level down all around the outside, such that it is below the inside floor level.
By autojumbled
#1259368
MikeG. wrote:Great stuff. I imagine those bricks are just laid on sand, or direct onto the soil.

The most important job you can do now is to get the ground level down all around the outside, such that it is below the inside floor level.


If they are laid direct to soil/sand - should I be considering digging them up and putting in something a little more solid? i.e. a small foundation and new bricks/blocks.
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By MikeG.
#1259477
autojumbled wrote:
MikeG. wrote:Great stuff. I imagine those bricks are just laid on sand, or direct onto the soil.

The most important job you can do now is to get the ground level down all around the outside, such that it is below the inside floor level.


If they are laid direct to soil/sand - should I be considering digging them up and putting in something a little more solid? i.e. a small foundation and new bricks/blocks.


I was talking about the flooring. I think you may be talking about the plinth. The answer to both is "approach with caution". If you can resolve any ground level issues, prevent water ingress anywhere through the walls and roof, and if you can maintain reasonable ventilation, then your building doesn't need anything other than maintenance and repair, in principle.........so long as it hasn't suffered any serious damage to date.
By autojumbled
#1270695
Seeing as the weather was nice at the weekend I decided to do some footings investigation - prompted by Mike's advice to bring the outside ground to below the inside floor level.

This main edge of the barn has approx 1 course of bricks (of the plinth) showing above the floor from the inside so digging the outside to the level shown here should take me where we need to be:

Image

It's pretty grotty though from years of being under earth. Bricks are a bit crumbly in places but I guess they're still doing the job.

Image

The rear edge is a similar story but I have a different problem here in that the inside floor level of this section of the barn is much lower. A good 3-4 courses of the plinth is exposed on the inside and the floor level has a step down from the main section of the barn. Therefore, what i've dug out in the picture below I don't think is yet level with the inside floor, or maybe just.
Either way, I need to get digging out this area to reduce the overall ground level outside (something I wanted to do anyway as part of my re-landscape of the garden):

Image

Image
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By MikeG.
#1270701
Great start. Well done. =D> =D>

Honestly, it's difficult to get across how important this is, but if you do nothing else other than this and fix any leak, your building will last decades longer, and be measurably drier internally. Be careful not to form any hollows/ sumps adjacent to the building as you dig away, bearing in mind that you've probably only a day or two left before the weather goes back to normal.