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By bugbear
#1197777
memzey wrote:A little while ago I was dead keen on trying linseed oil paint. This thread has put me right off that idea though!

It's not a paint - it's a whole alternative lifestyle!

BugBear
By Jacob
#1197784
bugbear wrote:
memzey wrote:A little while ago I was dead keen on trying linseed oil paint. This thread has put me right off that idea though!

It's not a paint - it's a whole alternative lifestyle!

BugBear

No it's just paint.
It's very different from modern paints and this takes a bit of getting used to - but the end product is painted joinery in muted colours with an "eggshell" finish.
Not high gloss, not the bright colours, not so self cleaning , but much more durable and permanent.
By memzey
#1197792
That’s what I thought Jacob which was why I was so keen on trying it. This thread just makes it seem like an almighty faff and nigh on impossible to get right.

All jokes aside I probably will give it a go sometime but this thread has made me weary. I dislike painting as it is and had hoped that this type of paint would be easy to get right and not flake off after a couple of years like most modern paints do. It may well prove to be more durable but I certainly appear to have got the easy to apply part all wrong! If, as with most things, there is just a knack to this then it’s not coming across clearly, to me at least, on this thread.
By Jacob
#1197850
memzey wrote:That’s what I thought Jacob which was why I was so keen on trying it. This thread just makes it seem like an almighty faff and nigh on impossible to get right.....

It's very easy to get right - it just has to be brushed out very thin, much thinner than you would be used to with normal paint.
It's very easy to get wrong if you try to lay it on thick like normal paint.
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By Chip shop
#1200479
This has been a really interesting thread, and made more so by not so many endorses/detractors.

I would sum my experience up as follows:

Pros:
Really nice to paint on
Brilliant finish, even on manky old joinery
Low odour
Cleaning brushes is a doddle

Cons:
Drying time is bonkers in white
Getting hold of the stuff from order to delivery takes two to four weeks (which is bog all use from a trade perspective)

All in all; I'm still using it. I will never ever use it for white again, as that has been disastrous on a number of occasions. Black, light blue and brick red seem to work OK. I still get the sense that there's a a bunch hippies somewhere that water in a bowl and dance 'round a camp fire to produce it, but hey ho.

For restoration jobs and re-painting manky old windows and doors it's great. But for production work it's not so good.

Merry New Year,

Ed
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By Halo Jones
#1208132
OK. So we just bit the bullet and ordered three litres of linseed paint, colour matched to "The Bosses" favourite colour. This is for all our exterior windows and doors which I will be stripping, repairing and finishing in the summer. However, we have a new door to paint asap so I was wondering what the best way to store the paint will be as it is coming in one bloody great 3 L tin and I have read that if stored incorrectly it can skin over on top.
By Jacob
#1208135
Shake tin upside down a few times to seal the lid joint.
Decant enough to use into a jam jar and keep the big tin shut. Always open very carefully so as to not bend the lid and spoil the seal.
If not tight shut it can skin over but it stops at that. Lift the skin off and its OK underneath. No VOCs so it won't dry out like solvent based paints. Very long shelf life even if it skins over.

I did quite a lot of old work but without stripping. It took really well to old paint cleaned down. Seems to stick to anything - did a wrought iron gate - brushed off loose paint and rust without going to a lot of trouble, and painted straight on top.
It's a mega labour saver!
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By ColeyS1
#1208143
Halo Jones wrote:OK. So we just bit the bullet and ordered three litres of linseed paint, colour matched to "The Bosses" favourite colour. This is for all our exterior windows and doors which I will be stripping, repairing and finishing in the summer. However, we have a new door to paint asap so I was wondering what the best way to store the paint will be as it is coming in one bloody great 3 L tin and I have read that if stored incorrectly it can skin over on top.
What brand linseed paint did you get ?

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By ColeyS1
#1208166
Halo Jones wrote:We ended up going with Oricalcum who seem to be UK suppliers for Ottosson Fargmakeri in Sweden.
I'm yet to try my oricalcum paint but have a good feeling that it might be better than the first lot of paint I tried. Keep us posted.

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By heimlaga
#1212878
One of my friends mixes his own linseed oil paint from boiled linseed oil and pigment. That's cheap.
By Selwyn
#1226424
Been doing a bit of linseed oil paint on doors and windows this week. By and large its been on top of old paint that was not flaking but had to clean out the rot in some areas and fill before painting.

Its damn good stuff. Even if its not so good as a top coat on old paint as it would be if used on bare wood I think it still pretty bloody good. I now have about 30 windows and doors all the same shade of Allback Sage green and didn't even use a litre of paint and only one coat. And if I just check them once a year for rot or a bit of peeling I'm pretty sure thats going to be a lot easier than repairing flaking external paints. Also in the summer sun it dries in 24 hours

I went back on the gloss to touch up a few internals and I hated it - heavy, gloopy, spreads poorly. Yes the finish is a bit more mirrored but that is its only potential positive. Linseed is a joy to use in comparison - much lighter on the brush.

I'm now going to order some "old white" to do the internals of the rest of the windows on top of the old eggshell thats peeling again. It will only flake off when the underlying paint does but even then touch up will be easier as the linseed paint will last in the pot.

So I'm a mega convert. It is slightly dull shade wise but I actually think its cheaper in terms of labour and coverage.
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By ColeyS1
#1226428
Selwyn wrote:Been doing a bit of linseed oil paint on doors and windows this week. By and large its been on top of old paint that was not flaking but had to clean out the rot in some areas and fill before painting.

Its damn good stuff. Even if its not so good as a top coat on old paint as it would be if used on bare wood I think it still pretty bloody good. I now have about 30 windows and doors all the same shade of Allback Sage green and didn't even use a litre of paint and only one coat. And if I just check them once a year for rot or a bit of peeling I'm pretty sure thats going to be a lot easier than repairing flaking external paints. Also in the summer sun it dries in 24 hours

I went back on the gloss to touch up a few internals and I hated it - heavy, gloopy, spreads poorly. Yes the finish is a bit more mirrored but that is its only potential positive. Linseed is a joy to use in comparison - much lighter on the brush.

I'm now going to order some "old white" to do the internals of the rest of the windows on top of the old eggshell thats peeling again. It will only flake off when the underlying paint does but even then touch up will be easier as the linseed paint will last in the pot.

So I'm a mega convert. It is slightly dull shade wise but I actually think its cheaper in terms of labour and coverage.
Sounds like a good experience !!! Don't suppose you've got any pictures of the freshly painted windows ?
My blotchy sample window has been sat on a shelf on display in the workshop. You have to get real close to notice the patchyness. Unless you were looking you'd just notice the main colour - far more likely to notice the window rotting away lol !

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By Selwyn
#1226431
I'll get some but I know what you mean by patchiness I don't see it as a problem but that can be areas where the reflection is a bit duller than other patches. I also painted a pvc window to good effect. Probably needs 3 coats for pvc.