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By Woody2Shoes
#1337874
Lazurus wrote:How on earth will this be policed and enforced?????
Trading standards, presumably. Coal will obviously be easier to enforce. To my way of thinking only a numpty would burn wet wood anyway.
By Woody2Shoes
#1337877
MikeG. wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:I am in two minds about pellets........What's wrong with a nice log on the stove?


The problem with a log on the stove is that a human has to remember to put it there, whereas pellets are fed into a boiler on demand in the same way gas or oil are: by a timer and thermostat. Let's be clear that we are talking about 2 different systems. Pellets can be burned in a stove to directly produce heat, in the same way as wood. More importantly, though, they can be burned automatically in a boiler to heat water for space heating and for hot water, working in the same way as gas or oil boilers. This is the real future for the product.


Yes, wood is much less energy dense than coal or oil. Two or three wheelbarrow-loads of wood per day vs 10 or 15 kg of anthracite vs a couple of litres of kerosene.
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By Trainee neophyte
#1337884
MikeG. wrote:
Trainee neophyte wrote:I am in two minds about pellets........What's wrong with a nice log on the stove?


The problem with a log on the stove is that a human has to remember to put it there, whereas pellets are fed into a boiler on demand in the same way gas or oil are: by a timer and thermostat. Let's be clear that we are talking about 2 different systems. Pellets can be burned in a stove to directly produce heat, in the same way as wood. More importantly, though, they can be burned automatically in a boiler to heat water for space heating and for hot water, working in the same way as gas or oil boilers. This is the real future for the product.


I was being overly facetious - sorry. We have a similar system locally using the leftovers from the olive harvest - very similar to sawdust, and it has olive oil to help it burn. A lot of people use a Heath-Robinson system with augers to generate heat for household hot water and heating. My point was that, as a sustainable, eco-friendly, green fuel, wood pellets use a surprising amount of fossil fuels. Even more if they are being shipped from Canada and USA. Perhaps I should have just said that.
By powertools
#1337888
I along with most of us I assume create over the course of a year a lot of dry timber offcuts so when we had a new house built in 2015 we had a proper chimney incorporated into the build and a Clearveiw multi fuel stove fitted into the corner of our L shape kitchen diner inorder to use up the offcuts and get some free heat.
It didn't take me long to work out that it's a mugs game. I was tending to the stove every couple of hours throughout the day there was always smoke coming out of the chimney and there is no way that it would have stayed on overnight.
I now give away my offcuts and use a smokeless fuel called Supertherm I now tend to the stove 3 times in 24 hours it stays on overnight and heats the entire house.
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By Trevanion
#1337894
Coal should've been completely phased out years ago really, at least in the next five years there shouldn't be any power generation from coal. In 1913 we mined over 250 million tonnes of coal out of the ground in Britain, In 2013 we imported 50 million tonnes of coal, in just five years in 2017 that was down to 8 million tonnes, I believe what was mined out of the ground in Britain in that year was under half of what was imported.

The unfortunate truth is it's cheaper to have some poor sod mine it in horrendous conditions for a pittance in Russia or Poland and have it shipped by the boatload to here than it was to have it mined and distributed completely here. THAT didn't help as far as pollution and carbon emissions were concerned.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1337898
A properly designed wood stove will be much more efficient at burning wood than a multi fuel will be - the draught intakes will be in different places. Clearviews are nice stoves, but cost a small fortune in baffles, grids, firebricks etc. - Mine worked out to cost £400 or so every three years on average. By the eighth year it had cost as much in parts as it had cost new. The running costs of my Dowling ............ zilch. :D
By Max Power
#1337915
I make wheels for horse drawn vehicles and use pallets to heat and expand the steel tyres to fit over the wheels. They burn like hell, no Idea what the moisture content would be though
By Yojevol
#1337929
Trevanion wrote:The unfortunate truth is it's cheaper to have some poor sod mine it in horrendous conditions for a pittance in Russia or Poland and have it shipped by the boatload to here than it was to have it mined and distributed completely here. THAT didn't help as far as pollution and carbon emissions were concerned.

The unfortunate truth is that it was cheaper to have some well paid sod excavate it in an air conditioned cab in Australia and have it shipped by the boat and train load to Didcot Power Station than it was to have it mined and distributed completely here. THAT didn't help as far as pollution and carbon emissions were concerned, but now Didcot and the imports are no longer.

Brian
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By Trevanion
#1337933
I thought Oz didn’t really export much here compared to the other two?
By Richard_C
#1337939
Remember we made all our gas out of coal once. Need to check date but I think it was mid 60s when the new-fangled natural gas came along, region by region, someone from the gas bosrd as it was called came along to convert the oven, new nozzles. A massive logistics undertaking.
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By MikeG.
#1337944
Max Power wrote:I make wheels for horse drawn vehicles.......


I'm a keen follower of Engel's Coach Shop on Youtube. It'd be good to see some posts on your work here on the forum.
By John Brown
#1337988
Max Power wrote:I make wheels for horse drawn vehicles and use pallets to heat and expand the steel tyres to fit over the wheels. They burn like hell, no Idea what the moisture content would be though

Probably a few posters in the EV thread would be interested in your services.
By powertools
#1338014
IMG_20200222_190827-1008x756 (2).jpg
phil.p wrote:A properly designed wood stove will be much more efficient at burning wood than a multi fuel will be - the draught intakes will be in different places. Clearviews are nice stoves, but cost a small fortune in baffles, grids, firebricks etc. - Mine worked out to cost £400 or so every three years on average. By the eighth year it had cost as much in parts as it had cost new. The running costs of my Dowling ............ zilch. :D


Well that is not anything like our experience of our Clearveiw stove it does have separate controls for wood or smokeless fuel.
We are now into our 5th winter of using it and we have had no maintenance costs at all.
By Mike-W
#1338034
RichardG wrote:As a rural resident I try and buy/ beg/collect recently felled trees/branches, cut split and then season. It’s unclear whether it’s ok to buy a wet trunk but not ok to buy wet wood that has been cut and split ready for burning that still needs seasoning.
Sounds like another half baked poorly thought out scheme

Richard

I'm a volunteer helping to manage our 15ha mixed woodland on the edge of our village . As part of our ongoing woodland management we fell broadleaf trees in the winter that have become or are soon likely to become unsafe to the many users of our woods, this produces about 20 m3 of cordwood i.e. all cut to metre length that we currently sell for processing as firewood to the local community. - Its our main revenue source to help manage the woods. We could sell some of it to a commercial firewood processor but i suspect the vast majority of our hardwood (which will be above 20% moisture content) would end up being burned in a giant bonfire-
What did Richard say about half baked poorly thought out scheme?