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By Trevanion
#1337750
There’s a one or two joiners around here that have briquette processing plants on the end of their dust extractors to turn the shavings into something easily burnable. Apparently they don’t really sell at all and you’d struggle to break even on a bag of briquettes, maybe once this legislation comes in there might be a bit more demand for them.

The last time I saw a place with one of those processors they had hundreds of bags of briquettes stacked up in a specially made shed because they couldn’t store them anywhere else and they just couldn’t get rid of them, I guess if they’ve still got them they might be in for a nice windfall :lol:
By AJB Temple
#1337754
We live in the middle of nowhere and have no mains gas. Hence we rely on oil and also have a log burner. For various reasons the land is apparently unsuitable for a ground source heat pump, so I looked into automatic pellet burners a while ago. These are capable of using the briquette type waste products, but it is incredibly difficult to find an installer who is remotely interested in domestic installations.

There does need to be a sensible rural solution. I burn all of my own wood waste, a dry some wood from our own felling and I occasionally buy a few cubic metres of apple (lights easily) and oak. Typically it is used on a 2 year cycle through our log store so is bone dry by the time it gets into our old and father inefficient inherited log burner. I am looking again at a pellet alternative for our new kitchen v new oil boiler. It does make sense to cut pollution, but not without providing sensible options for rural dwellers.
By Tris
#1337759
Perhaps a little off topic but I wonder how much embodied energy is in biomass and pellets.
We live near the main site for SDL who produce a lot of wood chips and by the time it has been felled, forwarded, chipped, carted, dried and delivered that must add up to a significant amount of oil used.
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By MikeG.
#1337761
Tris wrote:......I wonder how much embodied energy is in pellets.......


Quite a lot at the moment, but this is one of those things where a critical mass needs to develop before home-grown pellets take off in a big way. But they will, and then the pellets will make sense both financially, and in terms of their carbon footprint. They're huge in Europe, and have been for decades. They burn amazingly cleanly. The biggest issue I have found with pellet burners (and I'm talking about as a replacement for boilers, not for woodburners in the lounge) is the bulk storage requirements. The hopper and feed mechanism make the requirement for space something that many places simply can't provide. If you've got the space, and if you don't mind being an "early adopter", then I'd say go for it. It will pay off in the long run.
By AJB Temple
#1337765
I have the space but the problem Mike is finding a domestic installer and I am a bit worried about continuity of supply at the moment.
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By RogerS
#1337771
Woody2Shoes wrote:I think that the details have been poorly reported - particularly on the BBC website. Another example of how modern journalism in the internet age is so clueless - particularly when there's anything remotely scientific of technical to be reported on.


BBC ? Poorly reporting ? Now there's a surprise.

Woody2Shoes wrote:..I'm very confused about the "wet" wood bit - I think that it will need to be below a certain moisture content at point of sale.

Of course, if suppliers burn gas or coal to 'dry' firewood then there's a bit of a zero sum thing going on.


The report I heard (BBC admittedly) was that it had to be kiln dried ...and as you say bit of a zero sum thing.

Woody2Shoes wrote:.... (they were able to stop stubble burning at the drop of a hat because farmers rely on state subsidies).....


And as glider pilot I miss those stubble fires...the thermals were something else .
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By RogerS
#1337772
Dee J wrote:Tiny net bags of logs sold in petrol stations are the worst. Only ever going to be bought as a last minute/emergency purchase, yet un-useable without a lot of drying.

Well...you're in the right place to get something to get it going ! 8)
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By RogerS
#1337774
I'm fortunate. I have enough growing timber to see me out. I usually have it air-drying for two years although at the moment, other logistics stop me from keeping it out of the rain :(

Can you imagine..when our place was built in 1752 there were outbuildings galore. Then some vandal aka owner in the past got rid of them.
By Woody2Shoes
#1337837
RogerS wrote:
Woody2Shoes wrote:I think that the details have been poorly reported - particularly on the BBC website. Another example of how modern journalism in the internet age is so clueless - particularly when there's anything remotely scientific of technical to be reported on.


BBC ? Poorly reporting ? Now there's a surprise.

Woody2Shoes wrote:..I'm very confused about the "wet" wood bit - I think that it will need to be below a certain moisture content at point of sale.

Of course, if suppliers burn gas or coal to 'dry' firewood then there's a bit of a zero sum thing going on.


The report I heard (BBC admittedly) was that it had to be kiln dried ...and as you say bit of a zero sum thing.

Woody2Shoes wrote:.... (they were able to stop stubble burning at the drop of a hat because farmers rely on state subsidies).....


And as glider pilot I miss those stubble fires...the thermals were something else .




I wasn't having a go at the BBC specifically, more at the modern way of reporting news. I've gone and actually read the government proposals and they seem perfectly sensible, namely: phasing out the supply of bituminous house coal and firewood above 20% moisture content.
By Woody2Shoes
#1337839
Tris wrote:Perhaps a little off topic but I wonder how much embodied energy is in biomass and pellets.
We live near the main site for SDL who produce a lot of wood chips and by the time it has been felled, forwarded, chipped, carted, dried and delivered that must add up to a significant amount of oil used.

You're dead right, by the time it's been dried and driven a few hundred miles... Even worse, Drax burns 'biomass' which comes across from places like Vancouver in ships that burn bunker oil. Because the material is not very dense, the ship is used inefficiently.
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By Blackswanwood
#1337840
AJB Temple wrote:I have the space but the problem Mike is finding a domestic installer and I am a bit worried about continuity of supply at the moment.


We have been on wood pellets for the past 5 years and it has proved to be a good choice. It wasn’t easy finding an installer that we felt confident with and I ended up asking the manufacturers for a list of their approved firms. Some weren’t interested in domestic but most were up for it. Our installation was during a full renovation which made it a lot easier.

Pellets have gone up in price and are probably 10% cheaper in the summer.
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By Lazurus
#1337843
How on earth will this be policed and enforced?????
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By Trainee neophyte
#1337865
I am in two minds about pellets - nice product, but a huge amount of energy is used to make them: if not sawdust already, the wood needs to be chipped, then put through a hammer mill to get consistent size. Next the pulp is dried, (fossil fuel for heating) then then put through the pellet mill, then cooled, then shipped. What's wrong with a nice log on the stove?
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By MikeG.
#1337870
Trainee neophyte wrote:I am in two minds about pellets........What's wrong with a nice log on the stove?


The problem with a log on the stove is that a human has to remember to put it there, whereas pellets are fed into a boiler on demand in the same way gas or oil are: by a timer and thermostat. Let's be clear that we are talking about 2 different systems. Pellets can be burned in a stove to directly produce heat, in the same way as wood. More importantly, though, they can be burned automatically in a boiler to heat water for space heating and for hot water, working in the same way as gas or oil boilers. This is the real future for the product.