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By MikeG.
#1323618
Trevanion wrote:.........I think some of the nicest looking hand planes made today are made by The Lazarus Hand Plane Company......


$1800 for a jack plane, and you still have to tap it with a hammer to set the depth.
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By Trevanion
#1323619
MikeG. wrote:
Trevanion wrote:.........I think some of the nicest looking hand planes made today are made by The Lazarus Hand Plane Company......


$1800 for a jack plane, and you still have to tap it with a hammer to set the depth.


I said they looked nice I didn't say they were at all practical! :lol:

He/she? does have some neat looking adjusters on his/her? other planes though.

Image
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By Steve Maskery
#1323620
Ye gods. They are not even pretty.
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By Hattori-Hanzo
#1323628
I'm all for pushing boundaries and creating something new but I don't like the look of the 2 Bridge City planes at all.
They just remind me to much of the mass production world. I do like the D-ring locking handles and cradle idea though.

Have to say I'm a big fan of Lazarus planes, he's taking a traditional tool, putting his modern twist to it and getting it spot on in my opinion.
If I could afford it I'd own several of his planes but at $1800 they are far out of reach for your average working man.

Karl Holtey takes perfectionist to a whole other level! Another maker who's plane I'd love to own.
By D_W
#1323632
Trevanion wrote:
MikeG. wrote:
Trevanion wrote:.........I think some of the nicest looking hand planes made today are made by The Lazarus Hand Plane Company......


$1800 for a jack plane, and you still have to tap it with a hammer to set the depth.


I said they looked nice I didn't say they were at all practical! :lol:

He/she? does have some neat looking adjusters on his/her? other planes though.

Image


The one thing that chaps me a little bit about the heavy slab type work like that is the mix of curves and straight lines, but also the plain checkering on the knurls makes the knurl look the same as something you'd get from industrial supply. Take a look at the knurling on the older infill planes, and even on the lowly stanley depth adjuster wheel. It's segmented and wonderful.

The change from classical design to industrial design is probably responsible for the loss of some of those details. The same thing can be seen on heavy equipment. The castings and fixtures on the old machinery were really wonderful.

Fair to say, though, I don't know a thing about machine making so maybe others have a great appreciation for that look.
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By Phil Pascoe
#1323633
I have a Stanley No.6c, a Marples No.7 and a Stanley No8 from about 1930 (amonst others :D ). All are delightful to use, well made, nice pieces of good design. I didn't buy them for their increasing value, I didn't buy them for their rarity, I didn't buy them to leave to my children - I bought them to use. I wonder why people buy B.C. (or even some of the other upmarket brands) - I bet in 99% of cases it isn't to use.
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By Steve Maskery
#1323634
phil.p wrote:I have ... a Stanley No8 from about 1930 (amongst others :D ).


My dad gave me his on his death bed, literally. It was a beautiful plane. "It only needs pushing", were his last words to me.

It was stolen as part of The Great Haul. I did not use it often, but when I did, my goodness, it was the best.

I'd like it back, but I just hope that whoever has it now appreciates it.

So if anyone has one that is just cluttering up their workshop and would appreciate the extra space...
:)
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By Bm101
#1323637
If I had silly money I'd be going to Sauer and Steiner or Olly Sparks. And Philly Planes. And then a saw or 3 from the two German lawyers. I could put them all in a cabinet otherwise I'll have to blame my own lack of skill. Those tools, they are beautiful, functional artwork in the best way. The bridge city is not in a way that would ever justify my imaginary buying thereof because you don't buy planes at that price for an increase in performance that's quantifiable to the increased cost. They lack wow or that extra step in class to a collector I would guess than you would get with a bespoke master maker like Bill Carter etc... no pedigree at that cost.
If you can't fettle a cheap plane buy a LNielsen for bang out the box. But doesn't hide the fact you have to learn to use it some point. Like the sharpening nonsense. It's just a backdrop to actually using the tool.
This is poor mans logic you understand. And realistic logic.
:D
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By Phil Pascoe
#1323646
Yes. At risk of causing people to get the popcorn out, no matter what you buy if you actually buy it to use you need to learn how it works and how to use it. No amount of money excuses you that.
By Orraloon
#1323660
They have not managed to design in any improved plane features but the clever bit is they have designed in how to shave off a rather thick profit margin.
It's not to my taste but I am sure they will sell a few.
Regards
John
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By tony_s
#1323661
Thing is, stanley/ bailey more or less nailed it in terms of functionality but sometimes it's just nice to have nice stuff. Is my clifton No7 better than the stanley it replaced? No, but I get great pleasure from owning and using it. Having said that, I don't think I would ever want to own one of these BC planes no matter how wealthy I was!
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By woodbloke66
#1323869
On the other hand chaps, check out the latest toys that Matt Platt has up for grabs on Workshop Heaven. Then be prepared to fall off your chair :lol: - Rob
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By Trevanion
#1323872
woodbloke66 wrote:On the other hand chaps, check out the latest toys that Matt Platt has up for grabs on Workshop Heaven. Then be prepared to fall off your chair :lol: - Rob


https://www.workshopheaven.com/holtey-a1-jointer-plane.html

:shock: