Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, Charley, CHJ, Noel

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By AndyT
#1323260
Bod wrote:My Gilpin has two wings, just one is camera shy!

Bod


Ah, perhaps it's just really hard to get a clear photo. Presumably you can align yours to match the eBay one.

Consider me unconfused. Thanks!
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By AndyT
#1323384
Well, inspired by this thread, I decided it was high time I modernised and extended my toolkit. So I've just got back from Bristol Design with a couple of Cook/Gedge/Gilpin style bits to try out. More later - I hope everyone can bear the suspense!
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By Pete Maddex
#1323399
AndyT wrote:Well, inspired by this thread, I decided it was high time I modernised and extended my toolkit. So I've just got back from Bristol Design with a couple of Cook/Gedge/Gilpin style bits to try out. More later - I hope everyone can bear the suspense!



Try them on end grain, but tie a scarf round your jaw first to stop it hitting the floor.

Pete
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By AndyT
#1323442
Well, I've had a quick go on some bits of wood out of the scrap box. I was disappointed at first. I had tried sharpening just on the inside of the wings. This was difficult, there's only just enough room to get a needle file in at the right angle. Results were ok but not great.

Looking again at the bits I already have, I found that I did have two of this style already. They worked much better. They had been sharpened on the outside as well, so I did the same on the two I bought today, being careful to leave clearance behind the cutting edges, not a bump. (This has the advantage of only needing a small flat file, which most workers would have already had for other, commoner augers.) Success.

Once they were sharp, the bits all cut well, in side grain and in end grain, hardwood and softwood.

I'd say they are especially useful if you need a hole at an angle, as the rounded edges work better than the scoring cutters on a scotch auger when meeting an oblique surface.

And they are perfect if you need to deep countersink a screw, you can bore out for the screw head then use a smaller bit in the middle, where the leadscrew was, for a clearance hole.

All of this applies to the solid nose style too, but the Cook/Gedge/Gilpin design is a bit less liable to clog.
By Boringgeoff
#1323645
Yesterday I grabbed a piece of Marri (Corymbia Calophylla) from the fire-wood heap and had a test bore. First, a 11/32" branded Tyzack London, had been sharpened on the outside of the wings though from new or by a previous owner I wouldn't know. It bored the end grain quite well
Gedge 001.png
and check out the ugly end on the lead screw, didn't seem to affect it.
Gedge 003.png
Gedge 005.png

Next I chucked an unbranded 1 1/8" which the wings had been previously sharpened on the inside and it bored quite well too.
Gedge 006.png
Gedge 009.png
.
I'm disappointed my photos don't show the sharpening marks very well.
Cheers,
Geoff.