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By Jimromar
#1321304
Hello everybody.

I'm new and this is my first post, I have been building Oak Framed structures for a few years now and have just received a large order of "oak".

I am thoroughly convinced however that it is not oak.

There is none of the prettiness that oak is famed for and the end grain is just completely bare.

It has no smell and I have had a rusty file sat on it all afternoon in water and there are no black stains at all.

Please have a look if you get chance.

Many thanks

James.
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By AndyT
#1321305
I'm no expert, but if it's not oak, you're looking for other pale, open grained timbers.
Ash and sweet chestnut spring to mind as possibilities. Of the two, chestnut is probably lighter in weight and a bit softer than oak or ash.
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By Trevanion
#1321306
That's Ash. It's cheaper than Oak too, so you've been ripped off there.

Has quite a distinct smell when you're working with it, can't really explain what it smells like but it's sweet.
By phil.p
#1321308
AndyT wrote:I'm no expert, but if it's not oak, you're looking for other pale, open grained timbers.
Ash and sweet chestnut spring to mind as possibilities. Of the two, chestnut is probably lighter in weight and a bit softer than oak or ash.

Chestnut would have marked with the iron test. :D
By Jimromar
#1321309
Hmm. Thanks for the replies. It's not chestnut, I've worked with that and it splits beautifully and very easily.

So I'm correct then in thinking that there is no way it's oak and everyone thinks ash.

Unbelievable!
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By Trevanion
#1321311
Jimromar wrote:It doesn't have much of a smell whereas when I've got oak in the shop it is filled with the lovely smell of it, even before working it..


There is a smell with Ash but really only when it's being worked though, and when the shavings are fresh. If I had to describe it I suppose the closest thing I can think of is a kind of vanilla smell but not quite, it's hard to describe.

On the plus side, It's a very robust and strong timber that doesn't cost the earth, but it's not that great for external applications compared with Oak.
By profchris
#1321317
You might want to consider a different approach.

I'd be calling to say that an unfortunate mistake has been made, and they sent you ash instead of oak. Obviously they're going to sort that out for you, so you are calling to find out what they plan to do .... [at some point in the conversation, the inconvenience to you and your customer will of course get a mention, and by then they should be feeling guilty and want to make you happy]

An angry start often gets a defensive response ("Of course it's oak, we don't try to rip off our customers") and its downhill from there.

Up to you though.
By Jimromar
#1321318
Hahaha I appreciate the advice, I'm a generally mellow kind of person and would start of course by explaining the issue etc not going in all guns blazing. Was meant as a pun really. I do like your approach and will try it out.

Thanks. James. :)
By Woody2Shoes
#1321421
Trevanion wrote:
Jimromar wrote:It doesn't have much of a smell whereas when I've got oak in the shop it is filled with the lovely smell of it, even before working it..


There is a smell with Ash but really only when it's being worked though, and when the shavings are fresh. If I had to describe it I suppose the closest thing I can think of is a kind of vanilla smell but not quite, it's hard to describe.

On the plus side, It's a very robust and strong timber that doesn't cost the earth, but it's not that great for external applications compared with Oak.

I'd call it a nutty smell
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By Benchwayze
#1321444
Never used Japanese Oak, but I believe it is very pale. Could it be Japanese Oak?

And Ash smells to me like the ash-pan from a 1940's coal fire.
Hence the name? :mrgreen:

John (hammer)
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By Jacob
#1321459
Looks like oak to me.
https://www.google.com/search?q=oak+tim ... 40&bih=511
There is none of the prettiness that oak is famed for and the end grain is just completely bare.
Oak isn't at all pretty - except for the interesting ripple you get with planed quarter sawn surfaces. And the end grain is fairly featureless, except for the same medullary rays which give the ripple as above, but not necessarily very distinctive.
Maybe you have to revise your notions of what oak actually looks like?
PS Try to show the medullary rays by planing up a bit of end grain (they should be radial), or a quarter sawn (riven) face, which should show the ripple. If you don't get either then it's not oak?