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By Mr_Mickey_D
#1312982
It's been six months since I broke ground on my workshop build, now just finishing off bits and pieces.

My current quandary is the lock on the door. I want a key pad lock, allowing friend's to have access with a code rather than a key (may add a dead lock for when I'm away) but all the ones I've seen have a max door thickness of 65mm. My door comes to 72mm - 45mm frame (to fit insulation) , 19mm t&g cladding externally and a 9mm Ply skin internally.

Am I right in thinking that the max thickness for the door is set by the length of the square bar that goes through linking the three lock parts?

If my workshop was set up, I'd look at welding a bit into the bar to extend it, but can one just purchase a longer bar, or do I have to find a lock specifically for thicker doors? If so, any linkies you could provide would be greatfuly received.

Cheers
Mick

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By Trevanion
#1312985
I've never done a keypad lock, but if it's the same as any other lock you will need a longer bar (called a door spindle) that can be bought in many lengths to suit, and you also possibly need longer threaded rods to connect the two parts of the lock externally and internally.

I wonder if a keypad lock would work with a 3-point locking system, far more secure than a single point lock against prying.
By Mr_Mickey_D
#1312992
Trevanion wrote:I've never done a keypad lock, but if it's the same as any other lock you will need a longer bar (called a door spindle) that can be bought in many lengths to suit, and you also possibly need longer threaded rods to connect the two parts of the lock externally and internally.

I wonder if a keypad lock would work with a 3-point locking system, far more secure than a single point lock against prying.
Thanks trevanion,
So do you think I just buy the standard lock then the extras to make it work?

Not all that fussed about security out here in the sticks, theft is entirely focused on quad bikes, land rovers and sheep out here. It's quiet enough for anyone to not worry about going at the door/timber walls with a chain saw if they really wanted...

Lock is needed just to keep my kids from loosing a finger messing about in there unsupervised

Mick



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By Trevanion
#1312999
Mr_Mickey_D wrote:So do you think I just buy the standard lock then the extras to make it work?

Not all that fussed about security out here in the sticks, theft is entirely focused on quad bikes, land rovers and sheep out here. It's quiet enough for anyone to not worry about going at the door/timber walls with a chain saw if they really wanted...


I don’t see why it wouldn’t work with the extras to make it suit a thicker door.

I used to have the same mindset because it’s a similar area to yours, until a close friend had about £30,000 combined worth of cash and items taken out of their house in broad daylight, there’s been a couple of armed robberies, a few attempted break-ins on sheds and loads of van break-ins. They have caught some and they’re always from the big cities in England, no offence to anyone in those places of course.

It’s been enough of a reason for me to invest in extra security anyway.
By AJB Temple
#1313013
A female friend of mine has an electronic lock that you can enter with a code or a password. It took me less than 5 minutes to hack it (she had a bet with me that it was uncrackable - it was intended to defeat her ex, which it probably would).

If you search, it is easy to find hacking and picking videos for locks.

if it were me, I would be fitting properly secure locks and security hinges (the pin through type). Probably cheaper and much better.

If you want your friends to have access, then fit a good quality key safe out of view and well away from the shed. Only leave key in it when you know it will be needed. These usually use a six digit code (but be careful as again it is easy enough to crack if you know what you are doing).
By ace
#1313757
I'm in the middle of clearing out my father's garage/workshop.

There is a digital lock in amongst all the other stuff.

I looked at it tonight and I can tell you that on this one, and most others from my experience, the "spindle" is just a flat metal strip 1/4" x 1/16".

There are three spindles in the kit for doors from 35 mm to 55 mm thick. You could copy this easily yourself and make a spindle the correct length to suit your door.
You would also need to get two longer machine screws.

Hope that helps.
By sunnybob
#1313887
Just a note of caution here... in the worst case scenario and you lost everything, the insurance company would quite rightly refuse to pay out if it became known that more than one person had the code to the door.

And again, if a "friend" took someone else in there while you werent there and an injury occurred, guess who would be sued?
I dont recommend your plan at all I'm afraid, not in todays world.
By Inspector
#1313935
I had an electronic deadbolt on the front door of my last house. I could program it to open with several sets of numbers. I could also erase them and only have one. That let me give a neighbour access if needed and later delete it when I got back.

Pete