Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

 Reply
By OliT
#1295766
What are the general views on which is the best glue for internal applications? Initially this is for a kitchen table, so mortise and tenon joints mainly. Is there a benefit of Titebond II over Gorilla Glue? Should I be considering something else? All views welcome.
Oli
User avatar
By Trevanion
#1295767
It mainly depends on how fast you can run around to get something glued up in time :lol: PU glues like Gorilla, Soudal and Lumberjack are very fast curing and can be a pain in larger glue ups. PVAs like Titebond and the everbuild stuff is relatively slow curing and gives a bit of breathing room when doing complex glue ups. The holding strength is about the same for both types.

I still like to use Cascamite on complex glue ups where slow curing and a very good waterproof bond is required.
By lurker
#1295785
phil.p wrote:Nothing wrong with Gorilla glue or Titebond 11 ............. except they're twice the price of Everbuild 502 and D4. :D


They do have to pay for expensive advertising out of the difference in price.
By phil.p
#1295788
502 is water resistant and fine for interior work, in fact possibly a bit easier to use as it doesn't seem to grab quite as quickly as D4. D4 is waterproof rather than water resistant and is better for outdoor joinery and you can take your cramps off in warm weather after about a quarter of an hour (so long as you don't stress the joint), which is useful if you need the cramps elsewhere. I use both and slow them a little by misting the parts with water. As said cascamite or similar is good when you really need more open time.
User avatar
By ED65
#1295798
Just out of curiosity Oli, did you mean the original version of Gorilla? The name is no longer synonymous with foaming-polyurethane glue, they make a white PVA and superglue and some other stuff now too.

I think you'll get on well with 502, as you would with other less-famous glues. Many are just as good as the American imports that command so much attention online and in the mags. Virtually any PVA is actually capable of creating joints stronger than the wood, once that mark is passed you can pick your adhesive based on price, availability, British-made, open time or whatever knowing you're not compromising on strength.
By sunnybob
#1295808
I use D3 in the winter, or when I want an instant contact in summer (it becomes superglue over 30c).
I use titebond 111 in the summer because it still allows you about 5 minutes of adjustment, even up to 40c.

I havent ever tried mix it up yourself glue, I dont plan that far ahead.

I have tried evostick foaming woodglue in a silicone type tube. Oh boy, does that stuff foam! I shant buy another tube as it takes forever to remove the excess overspill.
User avatar
By Trevanion
#1295811
sunnybob wrote: I havent ever tried mix it up yourself glue, I dont plan that far ahead.


Not sure how Cascamite would cope in the Cypriot heat. I know in it's powdered form if the container gets too hot (happened in the van once) it can get quite clumpy and turn into stones of powdered glue which can be broken back down into dust but the glue doesn't mix right at all after that. It's pretty quick setting in a hot environment but nothing compared to PVA and PU glues.

sunnybob wrote:I have tried evostick foaming woodglue in a silicone type tube. Oh boy, does that stuff foam! I shant buy another tube as it takes forever to remove the excess overspill.


Did you try cleaning it while it was still wet and going off? That's the worst mistake you can make with PU glue, leave it until it hardens up and scrape off the foam when dry. It is downright messy stuff regardless so I don't particularly recommend it for hobbyist work, It's great for windows, doors, accompanying frames and anything otherwise external because it's quick and waterproof. It's not so great for gluing up that precious, heirloom, mitre dovetailed jewelry box you just spent the last few weeks making and really don't want anything to go wrong! :lol:
By sunnybob
#1295866
I've made no secret of the fact that I'm not only lazy :roll: , but cant be bothered to learn any more new stuff unless I absolutely have to (witness my resistance to using shellac :lol: 8) ).
Just the fact of having to measure and mix, when all I want is a single squeeze of glue along two edges at the most, means I shant find out if it does or doesnt work here. (hammer) .

I did leave the evo stick to dry, which allowed most of it to be scraped off, but even then it stained the wood requiring more sanding. I bought it for some outside wood work that used rough wood and I thought it would nicely fill in all the gaps. Of course I used too much and didnt realise it would ooze and expand like something from a horror movie.

Some of my boxes may well become heirlooms, but none of them are ever going to be featured on antiques roadshow :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: