Moderators: Random Orbital Bob, nev, CHJ, Noel, Charley

 Reply
By The_Wood_Basher
#1288101
Image
Hey folks I was just wondering whats your take on three wheeled band saws, I recently restored one and gave it a couple of upgrades which has made it quite a good saw. But its still a 3 wheeler!

I have heard that they are quite dificult to get running properly due to wheel alignment of the three wheels, Personnaly I have found it to be ok and do it exactly as I would a two wheeler.... maybe im lucky?

For anyone interested in watching a video of what i did to my bandsaw, I made a couple of videos that can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZhzxSA ... ex=3&t=84s
User avatar
By Trevanion
#1288114
The main benefit of three wheels is a deeper throat from a hobby level machine. That's about it. If you had only two wheels on that Rexon you would really only have 6" of cutting throat or so. On some the heavier industrial Startrite and other metal cutting bandsaws, they will have 3 wheels to get massive throat clearance for cutting large metal plates and the like.

I personally would've put the time and the little money towards something a bit better but if it serves your needs that's all that really matters.
By The_Wood_Basher
#1288121
Yes that was the main advantage I saw! The whole build cost me next to nothing as I already had most of the parts for it... The main cost was the saw itself which cost 30€ off ebay.

Ill probably end up upgrading to something better at some point though.
By phil.p
#1288135
For years I had the three wheel DeWalt - it was useful little saw so long you kept within its capabilities.
User avatar
By MikeG.
#1288137
I'll be after one of those one day, but not to use as a bandsaw. I'll chuck the blade away and run a sanding belt in its place. This will be for fine detail sanding, and in particular, for sanding the teeth of wooden gears. As a saw, I've never seen a 3 wheel bench top bandsaw that could deal with anything more than about 1/2" ply.
By phil.p
#1288139
I used to cut inch and a half to two inch stuff quite regularly with a good blade - mainly tenons and short cuts, but it was fine.
By The_Wood_Basher
#1288157
MikeG. wrote:I'll be after one of those one day, but not to use as a bandsaw. I'll chuck the blade away and run a sanding belt in its place. This will be for fine detail sanding, and in particular, for sanding the teeth of wooden gears. As a saw, I've never seen a 3 wheel bench top bandsaw that could deal with anything more than about 1/2" ply.


Now that is a good Idea!

I have cut out a Easter bunny on the saw which was made from a piece of ash about 6cm thick, so I know It can do it. However I think that was about the limit. There is a video on my channel of me making it on this saw.
By loftyhermes
#1288165
MikeG. wrote:I'll be after one of those one day, but not to use as a bandsaw. I'll chuck the blade away and run a sanding belt in its place. This will be for fine detail sanding, and in particular, for sanding the teeth of wooden gears. As a saw, I've never seen a 3 wheel bench top bandsaw that could deal with anything more than about 1/2" ply.

I had a Sealey one of those threee wheel saws that came with a one inch sanding belt and a little upstand that bolted to the table, had the saw for twenty years and never used the belt once.
User avatar
By Ttrees
#1288216
I have a similar machine without a table, and maybe someday I might glue up a belt or two for it.
Didn't know Sealey sells them so that might be worth trying out.

I wouldn't set out on buying one of these though, as its very loud with the brush motor.
By whatknot
#1288243
I bought one of these as a first band saw, its a Clarke version

Very similar only mine drives the power left wheel directly rather than by a belt to the right hand wheel

But for £20 and after a spruce up it was fine, and still is, I keep a quarter inch blade on it for odd things when I can't be bothered to change the blade on my other saw

If it dies I won't be at all bothered as its more than paid its way
User avatar
By AndyT
#1288257
I'd be really annoyed if my old Burgess 3 wheeler could only cut thin softwood.
Here it is, ripping beech at full stretch.

Image

(Yes that is an old jack plane, but it was really knackered and I was salvaging the wood to make a new plane.)

I bought it secondhand about 30 years ago. I sometimes think about getting something bigger or newer but don't have the room and this one does everything I need it to.
By John Brown
#1288320
I've got a sanding belt kit for my Inca 2 wheel bandsaw somewhere. Haven't used it yet, but spotted it on eBay a few years back and thought it might be handy.