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By PeteBowen
#1261542
Hi All.

Over the last few months I've discovered the joy of silent woodworking. My systainers are lost under the shavings from an old Stanley 5 I found in the rotting shed when I bough my house.

I want to buy a shoulder plane. I'm after your thoughts on whether the Axi version at £67 is a sensible buy or should I shell out for the Veritas medium shoulder plane at 3x the price.

Thanks in advance.
By Cheshirechappie
#1261600
Always seems a shame to me that Clifton never get a mention when new shoulder planes are being discussed. Still being made in Sheffield, now under Thomas Flinn's wing.

https://www.flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk/ac ... LANES.html
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By woodbloke66
#1261621
Cheshirechappie wrote:Always seems a shame to me that Clifton never get a mention when new shoulder planes are being discussed. Still being made in Sheffield, now under Thomas Flinn's wing.

https://www.flinn-garlick-saws.co.uk/ac ... LANES.html

I've got small Clifton shoulder plane which is superb, but the mouth was so tight it needed easing with a needle file. I've also got one of the old bronze bodied LN shoulder planes with the wooden wedge which appear to be no longer made - Rob
By deema
#1261721
I’ve had a Clifton and a Veritas, they are different and you hold them slightly differently. Both are excellent planes. I would try the Veritas and the Ryder out at an Axminster store as again they are very different to hold and decide which you prefer.
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By custard
#1261725
There's a lot of sense in Deema's suggestion of trying them out. A shoulder plane is much more of a precision instrument than a bench plane, and what's more a shoulder plane will probably be unfixable if you end up with a dog.

The critical problem is that the sole and the top surface of the frog need to be perfectly in line, if they're not then the tool will never work properly. It may function when used on one side at one particular setting, but it'll be awful on the other side without completely regrinding the iron.

That's why I'm always a bit wary of bargain shoulder planes, precision rarely comes cheap!

The other issue with a shoulder plane us the width and the weight. I trained at a workshop that recommended you only own one shoulder plane, but that it' should be the large 1 1/4" wide version. This used to be the default option for British cabinet makers.

Today some people are moving to slightly smaller and lighter shoulder planes (and they're also buying two or three tools). Personally I prefer the heft of the 1 1/4" version to drive through end grain when cleaning up tenons and I've never felt the need for additional shoulder planes in different sizes, but that's possibly because I grew up using one of these so it's what I'm familiar with. If you're new to the game then it would be worth trying different options before you buy.
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By woodbloke66
#1261750
G S Haydon wrote:Clifton, Veritas, LN and Quangsheng are all good tools. I'm not sure about the Rider brand from Axminster. I really like the chisels with hornbeam handles from that range, but the planes were not so good.

Agree Graham about the chisels which are Narex's with better handles. The Rider planes though are a bit of mixed bag, sometimes goodish and at other times bloody awful, but those that have tried them have left decent enough reviews on the Ax website - Rob
By AJB Temple
#1261771
I have tried a couple of Rider planes - gave them away.

My shoulder plane is Clifton, bought off the bay, and it is excellent. My Block planes are Veritas. I have a couple of bigger LN planes (bought from forum members at excellent value) and they are faultless. Most of my bigger stuff is old good quality Record but (hate to admit this) I machine most stuff through the PT. By far and away the plane I use most is my best Veritas block plane. It worked perfectly straight out of the box. This latter aspect is a must have for me: I buy tools to use, not fiddle with.
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By woodbloke66
#1261802
AJB Temple wrote:I have tried a couple of Rider planes - gave them away.

I have the original Rider No.4 cast brass, pre-production prototype, for which I made a teak tote and front knob. Definitely not for giving away :lol: - Rob
By Woody2Shoes
#1261828
Hi -

another option to consider might be a rebating block plane - it will do most, if not all, the jobs a shoulder plane does and more besides. I have one of these and I like it very much: https://www.workshopheaven.com/quangshe ... ype-3.html

The only downside is that I still cut myself on the sharp corners every once in a while!

I agree with the previous comments. I have a Rider 311 and with some fettling of the blade it works nicely. They are made for Axi by Soba tools in India and quality is a bit variable (and Axi don't seem to overdo themselves trying to "inspect in" quality). https://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster-r ... ane-506567

I also have the smallest QS shoulder plane and I love it - accurately made and doesn't require much fettling at all. https://www.workshopheaven.com/quangshe ... plane.html

I also have the Veritas middle-size shoulder plane and it's an absolute pleasure to use - the PMV11 blade is well worth the extra money. https://www.axminster.co.uk/veritas-med ... ade-717527

I also have a couple of old wooden rebate planes (one skewed, one not) from boot sales - with a bit of fiddling about it's possible to get excellent results.

The price of the above options varies from £2 to £200+ and I think it's a matter of trying some out, as previously suggested, and seeing where the balance lies for you. As far as resale value goes, I think the Veritas would hold its value best.

Cheers, W2S
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By tony_s
#1261893
My axi shoulder plane is not a bad piece of kit, I also have their bevel up jack (it was my first foray into BU bench planes- I wanted to see what all the fuss was about)and it's just plain nasty.
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By MikeG.
#1261900
Woody2Shoes wrote:.........another option to consider might be a rebating block plane - it will do most, if not all, the jobs a shoulder plane does and more besides. I have one of these and I like it very much: https://www.workshopheaven.com/quangshe ... ml.........


Interesting idea, but it looks quite a compromise to me. I can't help but wonder how strong it is, and how it would survive a tumble off a saw horse. It also looks awkward to hold whilst working on a larger tenon.