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By outcycling
#1261080
Hi guys,
Went on a course a few years back and built an acoustic guitar and now looking to get into building them at home so looking to convert single garage into a workshop with bandsaw being the biggest machine in there. Although do have a line of floor standing shelving units stacked with tools.

It’s currently brick single skin so looking to insulate but don’t want to loose much on room size if pos.
Walls could use 25mm jablite or equivalent with 9mm ply over or 25mm TLP maybe? Plugged and screwed. Or could batten out.
ceiling 50mm between joists and plasterboard or TLP.
Not sure what to do with floor.
If I put down MR 22mm tonged and grooved loft boards floating straight down on the concrete floor would that provide sufficient insulation factor? I was thinking 25mm insulation first then the boards but I expect the weight of machinery and tools on the floor will compress the insulation. I could go whole hog and put down 2x2 joists at 400 centres and insulate then board but was wondering if it was really worth the hassle for a floor that has more potential to deflect or fail under load.
Any advice greatly appreciated.
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By MikeG.
#1261084
A floating floor, done properly, is more than capable of supporting workshop machinery without measurable compression. You could easily put down 50mm of insulation (I'd always suggest Celotex rather than polystyrene) rather than 25mm, so long as you use T&G boards, glued, and they are held down at the edges by a skirting board. You are, after all, only proposing to have a bandsaw, and not a blacksmith's powered hammer!
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By Marineboy
#1261102
Could the TLP be some kind of insulated plasterboard? Whatever it is though, this and other options need to specify ventilation of void and vapour barrier arrangements.
By outcycling
#1261230
Thanks for the replies.
Talked to jablite and they said as mike did that floating floor should be fine although they did suggest going to the stronger type 100 product. If I am using 18mm loft boards that lock together anyway is there really any need to glue as well?
Re garage door I am probably going to stud wall over it so no loss there.
The inner door will though need to be dealt with for some insulated option.
The T@B (can’t remember now) is a plasterboard with insulation attached. Got the acronym off another forum so could be wrong.
Vapour barrier is something I need to address as there is no void so need to get it in the right place.
If I get the room sealed up tight will I have to put in some kind of vent system to prevent condensation? Any suggestions?
Thanks all
By outcycling
#1261233
Looks like if I just dot and dab walls with celotex pl4000 (plasterboard with insulation attached) it has the vapour barrier built in so that would be job done. PB isn’t great for workshop walls but then I can always fix a sheet of ply straight over the top if I want to hang tools etc on the walls?
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By MikeG.
#1261235
outcycling wrote:..... If I am using 18mm loft boards that lock together anyway is there really any need to glue as well?


You should use 22mm boards, not 18, and they absolutely must be glued together. This is fundamental. Loft boards are smaller and more expensive (per sq metre), so you would be much better off using orthodox 2400x600 floor boards. Don't forget to leave a 10mm gap around the perimeter of the room.
By outcycling
#1261337
Hi mike, are these the boards you are referring to ? What’s the different with loft boards? Looks the same?
Will glue and 22mm then and 50mm celotex.
Cheers.
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By MikeG.
#1261347
outcycling wrote:Hi mike, are these the boards you are referring to ? What’s the different with loft boards? Looks the same?
Will glue and 22mm then and 50mm celotex.
Cheers.


Loft boards are smaller to fit through loft traps. Otherwise the same thing.
By outcycling
#1261586
Hi John,

Richard osbourne in Wales. He used to be in Brighton but moved to centre of wales. Lovely chap. Spent a month there building a steel string acoustic. He explained it all and I did all the work. Looks fantastic and sounds a bit like a Lowden if you know your guitars. Wasn’t cheap but one of the best things I’ve done. Can’t rate it highly enough.