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By morpheus83uk
#1250369
Hello,

I have now found that I need to do some detail work and work on some smaller pieces of wood where a trim router would be best. I am looking for recommendations for the router and the bits. What size? Plunge vs fixed base? Interchangeable bases? How does dust extraction work? What sort of size router bits would I need 1/4"?

All suggestions welcome.

Thanks

James
By Bodgers
#1250521
morpheus83uk wrote:Hello,

I have now found that I need to do some detail work and work on some smaller pieces of wood where a trim router would be best. I am looking for recommendations for the router and the bits. What size? Plunge vs fixed base? Interchangeable bases? How does dust extraction work? What sort of size router bits would I need 1/4"?

All suggestions welcome.

Thanks

James
If you buy something like the Makita RT0700 it has interchangeble bases so you can have all your fixed/plunge etc. base options. It comes with a guard with a dust port on it to which you can attach a vac etc. Most smaller router trimmers have pretty simple dust port. Most are also 1/4" (6.25mm) collet.

There is a Chinese copy of this router by Katsu that is 1/3 of the cost, but it is louder and doesn't have a 3 year warranty like the Makita




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By Sideways
#1250551
The katsu in it's non plunge base has reasonable dust extraction. For work on small stock, screw it the the underside of a board and split your suction between a homemade fence and the dust port on the router base.
By morpheus83uk
#1253163
Hello,

Thank you I have spent all day looking at different trim routers and what seems to be coming out on top for me is the Makita RT0700. The reviews seem to be good, its been recommended here too! What do people think of it?

Also I am looking at the 30 piece trend 1/4" starter set so I have some common bits to use when I get it as I only have 1/2" currently. I am also looking at purchasing the CMT lettering bit as I am going to be doing some freehand routing making a few signs too. Does anyone have any thoughts on these bits?

Thanks

James
By GarF
#1253167
I have the makita and like it. Personally I steer clear of sets of bits. I think you can get better value and higher quality just buying the ones you need for the work you do and not having the other odd ones gathering dust. Someone will be along shortly to direct you to Wealdons- there is probably nowhere better to help you get the cutters you need.
HTH
G

Also, my experience with the dust extraction on the makita, connected to a wet/dry vacuum is that it is better than no extraction, but there is always a lot of sweeping up afterward, and I wouldn't work without a good dust mask!
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By Bm101
#1253180
I have the makita. I don't regret buying it but I'd probably buy the katsu now just for cost. Was using it today to make a router sled from mdf.
Used the vacuum port for the first time because of the mdf. Absolute nonsense! Hardly any difference! Indignant Outrage! Rahhhhhh!
Then a thought struck my idiot brain. When was the last time you emptied the lidl vac?
Ahhh....

Might be a while there.


*20 minutes later and a load of gasping, realising there's no spare bags , swearing and duct tape later*


Woooooo! Look at the dust extraction go! (Okay it's not 'perfect but no dust in the air to the naked eye. That's good guns to me.) I'll take that all day.

My only complaint is the extraction port attachment doesn't fit my lidl vac so it's a case of using tape. Is it too much to ask for standardised ports? :|

And yes.
Another vote for wealden.

*blows whistle and waves Wealdon flag.* Yay.
Last edited by Bm101 on 26 Nov 2018, 08:25, edited 1 time in total.
By morpheus83uk
#1254199
Brilliant so good all round that's what I like :). So I went to Axminster today to go and have a look at it and found out they have a cordless version as well! I spoke to a very helpful lady in store who explained the differences between them where there are pretty much none except a weight difference because of the battery. It made my decision even more difficult now! :lol:

To go cordless or not? As this could potentially be my first ever cordless purchase what to do? There are so many questions... How often do you need to change the batteries? How long does the battery last on say full power? Is it worth the extra money to be free of the cable? Is the power continuous until the battery dies or does it slow down gradually as you would expect? Does the cutting performance degrade with the power decrease? Do the more powerful batteries extend the life so a 6Ah would give longer run times than a 5Ah?

Sorry for all the questions as it's my first cordless purchase I am cautious I don't want to purchase something which will cost a fair amount only for it to be a poor choice. The lady at Axminster was very helpful and took her time explaining everything to me and did a full on comparison. :) so big shout out to the Axminster staff top notch!

Any help would be greatly appreciated :)
By Rorschach
#1254200
For me the cordless only makes if you do a medium amount of work on a regular basis. If you do a lot of work, you will get annoyed charging batteries (unless you own several high Ah batteries), if you only do a little work, the batteries will dies naturally long before you get reasonable use from them.

For me it would be pointless, I don't use my router anywhere near often enough to justify the cost of batteries and the problems I would have later on. Unlike a cordless drill I am not picking it up everyday. This goes for a lot of tools I own, I either use it so rarely that the cord is not an issue, or I use it so often that a cord is essential.
By Sideways
#1254261
I'm using an Elu router I bought back in the 90's. Still runs great on it's 4th set of bearings. Buy quality, buy once.
There's no way the next generation will be able to get compatible batteries to keep my cordless stuff running in thirty years time ...
By morpheus83uk
#1254544
Thank you for the replies. I would say I do a medium amount of work but it depends on what is being made. I have a big 1/2" router for anything large but currently am going to be doing lettering and doing straight lengths on small width boards. So something small and light would be ideal. Obviously what the future holds I don't know but I am sure it will come in cordless or not.

What sort of runtimes should you expect from a cordless? I mean some of the work will be Japanese lettering as well from printed work so free hand work without a cable I presume would be easier, but as its potentially my first cordless tool I am not sure given it's alot of money.
By Grawschbags
#1254591
Just a thought, but there's not much benefit to having a cordless router If you're going to attach it to a vacuum the majority of the time. A few video reviews I have seen say the battery powered ones are a little top heavy in use as well.
By morpheus83uk
#1255719
Hello,

Thank you all for your help with this I have gone with the cordless as when I looked at the garage and where I would be working the power cored would have restricted me and I don't have space for having an extension as well so that would have to sit on the work piece which wouldn't be ideal or practical.

Thanks

James
By Jack_the_Lad
#1256243
Sideways wrote:There's no way the next generation will be able to get compatible batteries to keep my cordless stuff running in thirty years time ...

Maybe so, but there are places and jobs where cordless is the only way to go, for example on site when going round quickly to swing doors and where there is a need to recess for the hinges.