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By GrahamIreland
#1250243
Just wondering what correct joints are for this table base design. It's fairly classic I'm sure, so would like to learn the fundamentals

Is it a half lap in middle, and a mortise and tennis at each leg?

Graham
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By Glynne
#1250245
If by correct you mean traditional, then I would say yes.
However, depending on the size and weight of the top, you could use biscuits, dowels, dominos etc.
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By AndyT
#1250250
You could also use bridle joints on the corners, with a half lap at the intersection as you said.
Have a look at Nabs's successful build of a Richard Maguire design here. I think it will be helpful.

side-table-t108189.html
By Sgian Dubh
#1250303
Tables with that X configuration as seen in plan tend to wobble side to side significantly (torsion) if it's used for such as dining tables. It's less noticeable in smaller tables, e.g., coffee tables with their shorter legs and generally shorter span of the rails. I mention this disadvantage because it's not obvious what size your plans for a table might be from your sketch.

For the most part, with exceptions, I wouldn't use this configuration for a dining table because the torsioning (rotation) can be severe enough to cause liquid spillage from drinking vessels, e.g., cups, mugs, wine glasses, etc. Slainte.
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By nabs
#1250548
that is certainly true for the small 'Maquire' side tables - I have made a couple and although I think they would hold a fair amount of weight the legs do flex if you push on the top from side to side.

When I made a larger coffee table to match I used a different layout as I thought this weakness would be more apparent in a bigger table.

PS if you do make a side table like this then Richard Maquire's excellent video series on the same is well worth the money IMO.
By Woody2Shoes
#1250610
GrahamIreland wrote:....a mortise and tennis at each leg?......


Hand tools will serve you best - power tools make too much of a racket. I'm sure you'll love the results... :wink: