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By autojumbled
#1250187
This is a fun one. :mrgreen:

Just moved into our new house. A late Victorian (exact build date currently unknown but title document makes reference to something happening in 1884) end terrace in the New Forest, Hampshire.
In the rear garden we have what I can only describe as a timber framed, metal-clad barn and a smaller similarly constructed shed.

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As you can imagine, these structures are pretty old and in need of some love and attention to get them water tight and functional.
My long-term aim is to make use of the barn as a garage and attached workshop, providing the structure is safe and is able to be repaired to a level we're happy with.

From looking over the building, its clear that that the older part is divided into stables with a hay loft above and a newer extension has been added, possibly for cart/carriage storage. I'm wondering whether it was housing for a taxi or milk cart or similar, back in the olden times. Certainly these buildings pre-date the house - I need to do more digging at the local library (as well as find some details on how 'protected' it is).

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Being realistic though, the chances of me getting to make any headway on any sort of restoration is a long way off as we have to focus on the house first. Any action I take now will be in aid of slowing down any decay etc.

The rear of the barn is north facing and is where the majority of the dodgy timber is located from what I can tell on my rough once-over.

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I absolutely welcome any information on similar buildings or knowledge from timber experts on where I should be concentrating efforts etc!!
Nonetheless, hoping this is going to be an interesting project that may one day serve as home to car tinkering. #-o
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By sunnybob
#1250210
wonderful to look at and explore, but a money pit to attempt to restore.
I think you should be praying for a hurricane (after making sure your insurance is up to date of course) :roll: :roll:
By autojumbled
#1250222
sunnybob wrote:wonderful to look at and explore, but a money pit to attempt to restore.
I think you should be praying for a hurricane (after making sure your insurance is up to date of course) :roll: :roll:


That reminds me - I need to check up on the insurance!
User avatar
By MikeG.
#1250227
Stunning!

I assume your house isn't Listed? Don't listen to anyone who says push them over. The conversions will be well worth the time and effort that goes into them. I've got a number of such buildings on the go at the moment, two at least in far worse condition. One thing I will say is that you should be extremely grateful for the crinkly tin, which has saved huge numbers of old buildings from destruction over the years.

If you do nothing else now, just nail down any flapping tin, and go around the outside of both buildings with a shovel, clearing back vegetation and lowering any piled up soil. Have a good look at gutters & downpipes with the aim of diverting rainwater away from the foot of the building. Your next job is to do a measured survey drawing, and start planning.
By autojumbled
#1250256
MikeG. wrote:Stunning!

I assume your house isn't Listed? Don't listen to anyone who says push them over. The conversions will be well worth the time and effort that goes into them. I've got a number of such buildings on the go at the moment, two at least in far worse condition. One thing I will say is that you should be extremely grateful for the crinkly tin, which has saved huge numbers of old buildings from destruction over the years.

If you do nothing else now, just nail down any flapping tin, and go around the outside of both buildings with a shovel, clearing back vegetation and lowering any piled up soil. Have a good look at gutters & downpipes with the aim of diverting rainwater away from the foot of the building. Your next job is to do a measured survey drawing, and start planning.


Thanks Mike, appreciate the direction.

I've already started clearing the edges and cutting out ivy roots etc to help things.
A slight issue will be getting access along the side of the building which sits on the boundary line with next-door. I've already started making friends so hopefully I can keep them sweet!
By Woody2Shoes
#1250259
I have serious shed envy!

Your profile says new Forest - if you're in the National Park the planning rules are a potentially a lot stricter. It's possible it could be "locally listed" as some kind of "heritage asset" - which again may make it slightly less simple to alter the external appearance - I guess your local Parish Council could help you clarify this.

I think that the best source of info. about former uses would be from chatting to old folk who've lived nearby for a long time. I got to know the old boy who was born in our house before WW1 (he only died about five years ago!) and he was able to show me old photos of the adjoining stables in use prior to WW2 - his job as the youngest boy was to look after the horses - raising water for them from the well.

It looks as if someone has renews the ridge capping on the hayloft relatively recently. The wiggly tin could be (re-)painted with black bituminous paint to extend its life - but keeping the timbers dry and preventing wind getting in and lifting the roof off are the two most important things.

Cheers, W2S
By autojumbled
#1250277
Woody2Shoes wrote:I have serious shed envy!

Your profile says new Forest - if you're in the National Park the planning rules are a potentially a lot stricter. It's possible it could be "locally listed" as some kind of "heritage asset" - which again may make it slightly less simple to alter the external appearance - I guess your local Parish Council could help you clarify this.

I think that the best source of info. about former uses would be from chatting to old folk who've lived nearby for a long time. I got to know the old boy who was born in our house before WW1 (he only died about five years ago!) and he was able to show me old photos of the adjoining stables in use prior to WW2 - his job as the youngest boy was to look after the horses - raising water for them from the well.

It looks as if someone has renews the ridge capping on the hayloft relatively recently. The wiggly tin could be (re-)painted with black bituminous paint to extend its life - but keeping the timbers dry and preventing wind getting in and lifting the roof off are the two most important things.

Cheers, W2S


I was informed by someone during the buying process that the barn is a heritage asset but so far I've found no official record of this. Once we're a bit more settled in I'll approach the local councils and do a bit of digging.
First port of call though is the local library as according to my neighbour they have a wealth of local history, maps, census stuff that might help me estimate it's age and purpose.
I do know however that whilst we are in the New Forest National Park, we're not officially in the conservation area. Oddly, our road is outside the area and the rear of the property sits on the boundary.

I suspect that providing the overall structure doesn't change, the council probably isn't going to be too concerned!
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By Harbo
#1250280
Apart from the NF District Council there’s the Verderers Court but they are mainly concerned with loss of grazing etc.
Probably a good thing being just outside their boundaries. I’ve worked on a number of road schemes in the Forest and they certainly made things very difficult.

Rod
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By MikeG.
#1250296
autojumbled wrote:.........I do know however that whilst we are in the New Forest National Park, we're not officially in the conservation area..........


These are two very separate things in Planning terms. Being in the National Park means, for instance, that you don't have the same Permitted Development rights as others, and the Park authority will get to be consulted on any application. It means that virtually everything you do to your property will require permission. A conservation area is associated with a village or other community, usually , and means that the local Listed Buildings people get to comment on any application. These are two distinct bodies. I doubt that being outside the conservation area will make any material difference to anything you plan to do, as in my experience national parks' requirements are more onerous than those applied to conservation areas.
By autojumbled
#1250316
I've lived in the forest for a few years now and have attended my fair share of local Parish planning meetings and think I've got a good feel for the sort of things they and the NF Planning Authority care/worry about when it comes to developments.
Maybe I can find a sympathetic local planner who i can get on-board to point me in the right direction.... we'll see! :wink:
By Woody2Shoes
#1250331
Mike's right - National Park status pretty much trumps Conservation Area - although they are two different things which don't fully overlap - and "local listing" would make things more sensitive still. I understand your point that you're outside the CA, but even someone just outside a Conservation Area can be affected by it in planning terms if they want to do something which would detract from the context/views into/out of the CA.

The key messages are: if you let it fall/blow down, you may very well not get permission to rebuild it; you may well be expected to retain the external appearance (which would be no bad thing anyway IMHO).

Cheers, W2S
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By MikeG.
#1250376
autojumbled wrote:Oh yeah, I definitely want to retain the external appearance. That's the easy but I reckon ....it's the stuff underneath that worries me!.......


Seriously, don't worry. You'll be fine with those buildings. If I lived closer I'd pop over and have a look with you, for the price of a cup of tea (and cake of course). Second best is the internet, this forum, and some good photos.