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By manxnorton
#1249700
Hi all,
Starting off getting to grips on box joints :oops:
I'll admit after years, I finally got one joint perfect!! bit went a bit Pete Tong on the other one.
Not by a nile but, still frustrating lol.
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chuffed TBH.
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TBC
Bri
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By manxnorton
#1250681
:oops:
DELETED THEM by mistake...
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Sorry.
Bri
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By MikeG.
#1250690
Well done Bri. Brilliant for persisting with these.

I am aware of the difficulties you face doing woodwork, and commend you for not only trying, but also for posting on here about it so openly. So the following is just a tip to help you improve, and not a criticism.

Take a look at your second photo, and the middle section you are removing. You have tried to chisel at the line as your first chisel work on that waste, and that is a mistake. The basic principle is to rough out the waste first, then work your way back to the line. Never start at the line: that's where you finish. In fact, the first time your chisel should touch that line is with the very last chisel cut you make. Just keep on practising, and you'll get it. Remember too that pine isn't easy to work with.
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By manxnorton
#1250828
MikeG. wrote:Well done Bri. Brilliant for persisting with these.

I am aware of the difficulties you face doing woodwork, and commend you for not only trying, but also for posting on here about it so openly. So the following is just a tip to help you improve, and not a criticism.

Take a look at your second photo, and the middle section you are removing. You have tried to chisel at the line as your first chisel work on that waste, and that is a mistake. The basic principle is to rough out the waste first, then work your way back to the line. Never start at the line: that's where you finish. In fact, the first time your chisel should touch that line is with the very last chisel cut you make. Just keep on practising, and you'll get it. Remember too that pine isn't easy to work with.


Thank you so much, i'm chuffed.
hmmmmm! I get it now....'sneak up' to the final mark =D>
Mate i'm thick skinned to accept critism or just tell me i'm doing something wrong.
Humour is the key....I love that people can see my mistakes, or point out them, as you know my brain goes into 'Tunnel vision!' and I cant see the trees for the wood etc. etc.
Posting them so openly, I said to myself a long way ago, its the only way I would improve.
And doing it honesty :D
Well of to the barbers to get my head sharpened for my Remembrance parade tomorrow.
Thanks for being in my corner lol. 8)
Bri
By Hornbeam
#1250842
Mikes comments about pine not being easy to work with is very true. To work with soft woods you need very sharp chisels.
Great start. You can practice paring to the line by marking intermediate points to pare down to
One other point I would mark the joint so the pins are only 1mm longer than the thickness of your wood
Ian
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By manxnorton
#1250870
Hornbeam wrote:Mikes comments about pine not being easy to work with is very true. To work with soft woods you need very sharp chisels.
Great start. You can practice paring to the line by marking intermediate points to pare down to
One other point I would mark the joint so the pins are only 1mm longer than the thickness of your wood
Ian


Thanks Ian.
Really good advice there, with longer than the thickness. =D>
TBH, all my effort will rewarded when I get power tools ( sawbench etc.) and all the jigs that come with them.
Satisfaction that I could (and did) with hand tools.
Learning the basis is what I'm used to anyways.
This hobby has giving me a lease of life, let alone therapy for my battered brain :lol:
Have a great weekend Ian.
Bri
By Hugopuk
#1251147
As a relative newcomer myself and having learnt from expensive timber mistakes the last cut at the line should be the one of the first thing taught to all aspiring woodworkers, shortly after measure twice cut once, again many expensive mistakes made!! Thanks.
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By manxnorton
#1251245
Hugopuk wrote:As a relative newcomer myself and having learnt from expensive timber mistakes the last cut at the line should be the one of the first thing taught to all aspiring woodworkers, shortly after measure twice cut once, again many expensive mistakes made!! Thanks.


Hello there,
Totally agree on that one.
Even if my hand acts before my brain says "this is how you do it..." :oops:
Bri
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By manxnorton
#1251250
LOVE TOYS!!!! :lol: :lol:
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here we go....assembly #-o :shock:
TBC
Bri
By Hornbeam
#1251326
I would persevere with the hand tool. While power tools make thing easier and quicker it is also easier to make bigger mistake more quickly.
While I have a very well equipped workshop I still do some jobs entirely by hand
I would keep working through the process on a joint like this
Prepare timber to thickness and width ensure edges square to sides
Cut ends square . These 2 steps are the basis of a lot of joints and are far more difficult than a lot of people think
Use a marking gauge set slightly deeper than the thickness and mark all round both ends to be jointed
Mark out joints. simplest to use a small try square and a knife and clearly mark waste
You can speed up waste removal by using a coping saw and then just paring away the last few mm. Last cut has the chisel set into the gauge line
Ian
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By manxnorton
#1251373
I am with you on that, persevere with the hand tools.
It’s at the stage that not happy with the straight edge cutting by hand, and the uneven warped etc of the wood I get.
Hence the thicker and jointer and of course the saw bench.
The prep is cut in half.
Ok I got hand and power planer, jig saw etc.
But hope you understand my thinking lol.
There’ll be a lot of jigs to make (specially the table sawbench) and eventually router set up.
I’ve clawled before I can walk tbh...
Not saying I’m upping my game..just enjoying myself and that’s the most important part.
And of course safety and my limitations with my disibilty etc.
Thank you
Bri
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By manxnorton
#1251470
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Bri
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By manxnorton
#1251472
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By Bm101
#1251492
I have the Evo sliding compound saw Bri. Bought it mostly for diy on the house. It's a good bit of kit for the money. Great In Fact. For The Money. (hammer)
It's possible to up it's accuracy and fettle it a bit but it will never be a top saw. Nowhere close to a top model. It's just not made to that standard. Given time and effort you can get a fair performance out of it and that's the point isn't it? You buy the best tool for the job at hand that matches with the economical viability of your situation.
Please forgive me if I'm preaching to the choir here. My apologies if I am.
Just be prepared to spend some time fettling and settling that machine before you get the amazing results you're thinking might solve all your issues. Then a bit more and then a bit more.
Thing I've found with woodworking is it's like hill walking. you reach a summit then see another one a bit higher, just far enough along to keep you walking on.
Just a heads up to a lesson hard learned with machines.
Not trying to put you off. Just don't get discouraged too early either.
Keep fiddling mate. =D>
Regards
Chris
By MusicMan
#1251593
I had the Evolution saw table for several years and found it a useful tool. Not up to the Wadkin that I have now, but still quite usable. +1 for aligning it to improve precision.

And I don't think I would want to move/assemble/adjust/use the Wadkin beast with only one hand.

Use and enjoy. Get ear defenders though!