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By mynamehere
#1231268
Hi guys,

I got my hands on a Startrite 352 bandsaw and I'm in the process of taking it to bits for inspection, cleaning lubrication etc.

I noticed that the tires are flat, is this ok or should they be crowned?

There is also a bit of damage to the table where the blade has eaten a bit into one side of the gap where the blade runs, can this be "fixed" with a bit of JBweld?

Thanks for any advice,

Ferenc
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By Ttrees
#1231290
The best thing to do is get a blade on it and see how it tracks without it powered on...
If it dosent walk off the wheels, try powering it on for a second to see what happens...
I wouldn't worry about the marks on it as long as it has no movment side to side or forward and backwards,
and isin't rubbing into the tires.
Are you talking about the table insert having some damage from the blade ?
You can fix that one, make another ZCI type for whatever angle you like, and other ZCI types if you fancy
but its not very nesiccary, only if you plan on cutting veneer or thin stuff that could get trapped between blade and insert,
or worse between bottom guide and blade, I find it is it nesiccary, and would suggest getting the saw running sweet first
as you will make a better job of the insert slot when fettled.
You can always have a thin ply sheet to make up an instant ZCI covering your whole table on the quick.

Tom
By Beau
#1231297
No problem with there being no crown on the tyres but I think you need to run the blade with the teeth just off the front edge of the tyre. My Kity was like that and worked perfectly.
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By Lons
#1231308
Just to add that if it's an early model like mine there is no table insert though the area around the blade has a shaped thinner section underneath the table. I thought about cutting that out and fabricating an insert of some kind but never got around to it as it works fine without modification.

My table also had damage when I got it and I filled it with JB Weld but it didn't last.

Remember to check the rear blade guides which are steel rods with a brazed carbide end as these fall off eventually. I didn't want to pay Startrite prices for replacements so used JB Weld to stick on some carbide cutter tips which last a long time. I made up some spares but have used only one to date.

Bob
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By Pete Maddex
#1231374
I run the blade in the middle of the tyres, the teeth don't damage the rubber and the rubber doesn't damage the teeth.

You can do a guide modification to ball bearings cheaply which helps cutting curves.

startrite-352-t54696-15.html?hilit=startrite

Pete
By mynamehere
#1231411
Thanks for the replies, the upper guide was already replaced by the previous owner to a Panhans (I think) guide.
The bottom guide is original, the back guide with the round tip has a groove running through it (about 0,5MM deep) from where the saw blade has cut into it.

I found some cast iron repair stuff from Screwfix https://www.screwfix.com/p/unibond-3607 ... 0wodDlYIKQ
I'll give that a go for the table repair.

I'll keep the blade running where it says in the manual, this also confirms what Pete Maddex said, in the middle of the tire.

Cheers!

Ferenc
User avatar
By Lons
#1231438
mynamehere wrote:I found some cast iron repair stuff from Screwfix https://www.screwfix.com/p/unibond-3607 ... 0wodDlYIKQ I'll give that a go for the table repair. Ferenc


I've used that for several jobs, might still have an unopened tin somewhere and I think it's fairly similar to JB Weld when cured. Certainly it can be sanded and filed quite easily so may be a bit soft as the blade will cut into it if it touches. Worth a go though.
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By Lons
#1231463
memzey wrote:Once cured does it look metallic?


Not what I've used, it's just med - dark grey with a satin surface until you sand it of course. It's a bit like car filler tbh but I assume maybe tougher.
By memzey
#1231520
Thanks. I wonder if there is a similar filler that actually looks metallic so can be used to repair visible items without making the job seem too obvious?
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By Pete Maddex
#1231549
mynamehere wrote:Thanks for the replies, the upper guide was already replaced by the previous owner to a Panhans (I think) guide.
The bottom guide is original, the back guide with the round tip has a groove running through it (about 0,5MM deep) from where the saw blade has cut into it.


Cheers!

Ferenc



Sounds like the Carbide tip has fallen off the bottom back guide you will have to fit a piece of carbide in its place, masonry drills have a Carbide tip brazed in, or you might be lucky and find its in the wrong way round!

Pete
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By Lons
#1231582
Here's my version of new tips stuck on with JB Weld as in my previous post. They work very well. Tips came from ebay
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