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By D_W
#1207335
I buy the steel from an industrial supplier, so I have no idea what different steels look like in scrap form.

My preference for wood is rift with pith centered well so that it doesn't want to twist, and then the pith side is oriented up. Quartered is ok, but the top of a plane can look like a cheap steak knife if all you see is the flat sawn face.
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By Ttrees
#1207341
I wouldnt have thought there would be much difference in looking at a flatsawn face
if the pith were orientated either way, but then again I'm not used to exotics with features, or in quanitys that I
could consider the look.
Thanks
Tom
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By Pete Maddex
#1207364
If you are worried about expansion/contraction use Corian.

ImageMy Corian infill plane by Pete Maddex, on Flickr

ImageNew Shoulder plane by Pete Maddex, on Flickr

ImageDSC_4720_zps084197e1 by pete maddex, on Flickr

Pete
By D_W
#1207385
They look great, pete! Especially the one with the black infill.

For some reason, I think of using the toilet when I see the one on the bottom. Or maybe rolling out a pie crust or slicing noodles on the countertop.
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By Pete Maddex
#1207408
Thanks chaps.

I have 2 if the second one on the go at the moment they are 200mm by 18mm.
The last one was made as a test piece to make sure I could rivet through the corian.

Pete
By patrickjchase
#1207629
D_W wrote:It's just annealed hot roll (1018 or something, anything malleable works fine). If it's not annealed, don't purchase it. The cheaper stuff like this can be out of flat a little bit, so you mallet anything that's too far out of flat so that it's close.


Have you found work-hardening to be an issue when you do this?

IIRC 1018 can gain >50% yield strength from cold working (for example hot-rolled 1018 is nominally ~32 kpsi, while cold-rolled is ~54 kpsi), but I have no sense of how much work it would take to cause that. Most likely what you describe would have an insignificant effect.
By D_W
#1207646
Never had any problems with work hardening, but I have had O1 crack (first two planes I made, I used O1 for the sides and bottom per the recommendation of a professional builder. The cracking was minor, though, and I still have and use the plane.

No trouble with brass or mild steel so far, but I haven't tried 360 brass yet. The cross strap for this plane will probably be 360 brass, so I'll see.
By D_W
#1207649
This weekends updates:

* opened the mouth and filed the rough start of it. It should've been left shorter of the sides so that the pins had extra support, but I forgot that. If it's a real concern (I think it is in this case), I'll cut and fit a steel blank to support the sides in peining).
https://s13.postimg.org/pdy9qr4fr/02112018_169.jpg

(oh, and the sole plate was peined into place). The final infill will be installed about half mm back or so to file out the bit of unfiled area. Or maybe not. I haven't yet decided - it's probably just cosmetic, but I can make a quick wood mock cross section of iron with a 30 degree bevel to see - that'll probably determine whether or not I fix it).

I need the mock infill to lay out the iron and wedge ,and locate where the cross strap will be, as well as what all of the angles will be so that the strap fits mostly flush inside the infill. It's a lot easier to mock this up and create patterns out of wood to measure from. Anything else is dangerous because a big layout mistake is terminal.

I also cut and tapered the iron. My stock is oversize O1, .26" thick, and I tapered it along its length to 0.22 halfway through its length and 0.20" at the far end (a hollow shape rather than a straight taper - for various reasons). Since this is all being done freehand, the iron will also be full width of the plane body at the mouth end and a little more than a 16th narrow where it exits the plane.

Forgot to take pictures of the iron, except this view of the side as I was beveling it to fit flush with the sides of the plane.
(this was before tapering). I never thought I'd have a use for a vixen on ferrous metal, but it rips, and has held up really well. I anticipate using it to flatten and square the final peined plane.

https://s13.postimg.org/vsxanjdrb/02112018_170.jpg

This kind of building (patterning and fitting without much measuring) is pure bliss.
By D_W
#1207650
A picture of the secondary notch for ttrees. notice the small open notch next to the pin. It's filed there so that the pein pulls the parts tight and holds them together. There is no part of these joints that doesn't hold in both directions, as both the pins and tails have this notch. I just filed these in fast since this is steel on steel and I don't want to see any evidence of a joint at all (so it doesn't matter if all of the tails don't have any specific angle).

https://s13.postimg.org/yoadubpg7/02112018_172.jpg
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By Ttrees
#1207651
Thanks David
That clears up a few things, apart from how many/what tools you need, and how long it takes to
pein that.
I have since started watching Bill Carters videos again, remembering on it that he was hoping to be able to pein the cupids bow details he does.
If he didn't pein that, how is is possible to be able to spread that mild steel out ?

It clearly works for you guys, I just dont know how its done, and how long it takes :)

Cheers
Tom
By iNewbie
#1207672
D_W wrote:
I've noticed the same thing with my beech planes. No matter what time of the year I build them, they get tight on the irons after a little while. They're kiln dried and over a year additional air dry in my basement. Same with the old ones - they were probably dry when they were made, but if they're left without use, they tighten up on the iron and wedge and can blow out their cheeks.

.


I wonder if using thermo-treated wood would make a difference. Its becoming a fad in the guitar building world.
By D_W
#1207700
It's not really a problem in wooden planes as long as they're being used. If it's like anything else with guitars, it's probably like something done elsewhere, but for five times the price. I'll have to see what it actually is (before I was a woodworker, I played a fair amount of guitar and bought a lot of them).
By D_W
#1207701
Ttrees wrote:Thanks David
That clears up a few things, apart from how many/what tools you need, and how long it takes to
pein that.
I have since started watching Bill Carters videos again, remembering on it that he was hoping to be able to pein the cupids bow details he does.
If he didn't pein that, how is is possible to be able to spread that mild steel out ?

It clearly works for you guys, I just dont know how its done, and how long it takes :)

Cheers
Tom


You literally just hammer it. A bigger plane like this will probably take an hour to pein. The only concerns are to do it evenly and to not strike the metal that you're not peining.

As far as tools, you need a metal scribe, a hack saw and a few extra files. I'd recommend a post drill, too, but you don't really even need that. It helps a lot for accurate drilling, though. (edit to add, layout fluid like dykem is really helpful).

You also need something to act as an anvil, but it doesn't need to be a full blown anvil.
By patrickjchase
#1207789
D_W wrote:It's not really a problem in wooden planes as long as they're being used. If it's like anything else with guitars, it's probably like something done elsewhere, but for five times the price. I'll have to see what it actually is (before I was a woodworker, I played a fair amount of guitar and bought a lot of them).


In this instance "it" is torrefaction, the same thing that LV does to their chisel handles. It does indeed stabilize the wood against moisture changes, though there are tradeoffs, most notably embrittlement and loss of mechanical strength if you take it too far. After all there is a specific name for the residue that remains after torrefaction runs to completion: "charcoal".

As you say it's been played up (and priced up) quite a bit more in the lutherie world than elsewhere.