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By Chip shop
#1173986
I bought two cans of linseed oil paint (one black and one white) a few months back, but as most of my painted gear gets sprayed it gets used fairly infrequently. I lent the can of white to a mate who I'd made a sliding sash for, telling him it's the business and will probably lead to the invention of the longer lasting light bulb and, possibly, be the cure to untold life threatening diseases. He gave it me back whining that it took so long to dry that he had to wipe it all off and paint it with 'real' paint.

I assumed he was being a big girl, and thought no more of it until I came to use it on Saturday. I have a fairly big window frame for a grade 2 listed project sitting on the bench. It is all U/S reds, so I hit it with some knotting, then primed with linseed and went on with a really thin coat of white. I came back to it next day and it was as if I'd just painted it, with no sign of curing at all. It's the same deal tonight, it's not even tacked off. The black I bought at the same time has been used on a couple of jobs, and I've been really impressed, so I'm at a loss as to what is wrong with the white. Does anyone have any idea what I might be doing wrong? Or does the pigment in the paint really have that much of an effect on drying times?

Cheers,

Ed.
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By ColeyS1
#1173993
Oh joy, I still haven't tried my newly aquire linseed paint, perhaps I should do it now and give it a few months to dry :lol: I think I read somewhere that white was the only iffy colour out of all of them. I thought it was to do with the colour changing though.
Hope you get to the bottom of it.
Coley

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By ED65
#1174053
I'm trying to remember if titanium white retards the drying of oil, but regardless it is known to create a slow-drying oil paint unfortunately. Big big change from the old days when white was always a completely reliable dryer because of the lead pigment, which we're not allowed to have any longer :-(
By phil.p
#1174054
Try a drop of terebine driers? It's what is added to BLO apparently.
By Selwyn
#1174066
I have added kerosine in the past.

If you can't give it time to dry don't use it. It will dry and it is great though - I'd hardly use it indoors though as much
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By Chip shop
#1174084
Selwyn wrote:I have added kerosine in the past.

If you can't give it time to dry don't use it. It will dry and it is great though - I'd hardly use it indoors though as much


Don't get me wrong. I know it's good gear. The other colours I've used, while a little slow to dry, have been fine. I guess the drop in temperature hasn't helped much.
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By ED65
#1174128
Just to note that kerosene or other diluents don't actually make oil paint dry faster. What they do is thin the paint so that a thinner and more uniform coating is applied and a thin coat of course dries faster than a thicker one.
By Jacob
#1174131
Needs to be brushed out very thin and then it dries reasonably quickly.
This also means it goes a long way and putting it on is fairly fast/unskilled.
If too thick it won't dry at all - it'll run and skin over etc.
It's very different from ordinary paints but once you get the hang of it it's the bees knees.

I came back to it next day and it was as if I'd just painted it, with no sign of curing at all. It's the same deal tonight, it's not even tacked off.
It's like that - then when your back is turned it goes off - unless it's too thick or the first coat wasn't dry, in which case you have problems.
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By Chip shop
#1174141
Jacob wrote:Needs to be brushed out very thin and then it dries reasonably quickly.
This also means it goes a long way and putting it on is fairly fast/unskilled.
If too thick it won't dry at all - it'll run and skin over etc.
It's very different from ordinary paints but once you get the hang of it it's the bees knees.

I came back to it next day and it was as if I'd just painted it, with no sign of curing at all. It's the same deal tonight, it's not even tacked off.
It's like that - then when your back is turned it goes off - unless it's too thick or the first coat wasn't dry, in which case you have problems.


Yebut, I did brush it on thin. There was virtually no obliteration. I've used some of the other colours before (red, blue and black) and this definately seemed to behave differently. I left it out in the sun today and it's getting there slowly. Thankfully I'm not fitting until the weekend, so no panic.
By Jacob
#1174142
Chip shop wrote:.....Thankfully I'm not fitting until the weekend, so no panic.

Personally I wouldn't paint at all until fitted, except for knotting and oil as primer.
By Roland
#1174170
Earlier this month I was trialling paints for a project. I wanted to use oil paint pigments. Using linseed as a solvent I needed to brush it so thinly that it required multiple coats before the cover was satisfactory. White spirit dried quickly, but gave a Matt finish, which would, have been acceptable for an initial coat. Ultimately I settled on Osmo Polyx as the best balance of coverage, drying time, and silk finish. Probably wouldn't be acceptable for listed property renovation though.
By Jacob
#1174172
Roland wrote:Earlier this month I was trialling paints for a project. I wanted to use oil paint pigments. Using linseed as a solvent I needed to brush it so thinly that it required multiple coats before the cover was satisfactory. White spirit dried quickly, but gave a Matt finish, which would, have been acceptable for an initial coat. Ultimately I settled on Osmo Polyx as the best balance of coverage, drying time, and silk finish. Probably wouldn't be acceptable for listed property renovation though.

Er - linseed oil isn't a solvent.
What were you doing, thinning other paint with linseed oil? No wonder it needed multiple coats.
Linseed oil paint (Allback - I don't know about other brands) seems always to be very dense with one coat enough to cover most things. The white will need two.
By Jacob
#1174206
Chip shop wrote:
The white will need two.


Why will the white require another coat?

Dunno but it seems to be thinnest. I've used the red and the cornflour blue and they are both very dense and cover anything in one coat. I think perhaps titanium white is expensive. In fact they sell it separately as an additive - perhaps that's why.
re Rolands paint experiments above: linseed oil paints are what artists have used for millennia and depending on the pigment can be as dense as you like - no need for multiple layers for most pigments.
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By ED65
#1174312
Jacob wrote:I think perhaps titanium white is expensive.
Dirt cheap.

Titanium white is the major industrial pigment, used in everything from toothpaste and pill coatings to plastics and paints of every kind imaginable, and a few besides.

And as with most things the more that is produced the lower the price goes so it's really very cheap as pigments go.