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By MarkDennehy
#1157272
So when it comes to jointing and planing, I've no problem with hand planes for the small hobbyist stuff I do; that's fine. But thicknessing with a handplane, well, that rather sucks.
And in a housing estate full of nimbys, a normal screamer of a lunchbox thicknesser is probably going to trigger nasty letters.
So are there any options for induction-motored thicknessers in a small form factor like a lunchbox thicknesser?
Or do I just have to lump it and use a scrub plane until I can move to a larger shed?
By Neil S
#1157281
I scoured high and low for a lunchbox thicknesser with an induction motor but couldn't find one.
The best I could find was reviews saying the Makita 2012NB was regarded as the quietest of the lot.

However, I finally bit the bullet and got the Axminster equivalent of the Record PT260 planer/thicknesser which they don't seem to sell anymore :roll: .
I had eventually come to the conclusion that if you didn't put the planer wings on it's not a great deal bigger footprint than some of the lunchbox models. Although you can't just stick it under a bench like you can a lunchbox. But noise was top priority to me, I knew if it screamed I would be reluctant to use it.
The axminster came with an induction motor and a discount making cheaper than some of the lunchbox models. It had a storage cabinet beneath it and a free wheel base kit that I could roll it into a corner. I also had the option to place on the wings and do planing as well (which I have since needed to do). So I am happy with my decision.

EDIT: Actually I think you have to have the planer infeed wing on when thicknessing for the dust extranction hood to work unless you cobble something together and press the microswitches.

Hope that helps

-Neil
By sunnybob
#1157285
The makita is touted as the quietist motor, but its still VERY LOUD!

And of course people often forget that the blades make noise slicing the wood.

I wanted the makita but could not justify the extra price so bought the jet 12" thicknesser. No way can I stand next to that without head phones on. And I mean shooting quality noise cancelling. The thing screams.

I would say louder than a small 2 stroke motorcycle engine with an after market silencer. Definitely not an 8 pm machine. it would be ok if you did it mid afternoon before they all came home for tea, as long as it didnt run for more than one plank a day.
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By Nelsun
#1157288
The Makita is quieter (compared to its predecessor, a Titan P/T) but it's still a ear defender job. And that's from another small shed warrior. It's the cutting that makes most of the noise so maybe it's the type of blade in the block rather than the helix types that reduce the screaming to any degree.

I know you can get a helix cutting block for the dewalt (billed as being super loud out of the box) for extra dosh. There's likely videos on the tube that may give some comparison between the different blocks.

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By Bodgers
#1157323
MarkDennehy wrote:So when it comes to jointing and planing, I've no problem with hand planes for the small hobbyist stuff I do; that's fine. But thicknessing with a handplane, well, that rather sucks.
And in a housing estate full of nimbys, a normal screamer of a lunchbox thicknesser is probably going to trigger nasty letters.
So are there any options for induction-motored thicknessers in a small form factor like a lunchbox thicknesser?
Or do I just have to lump it and use a scrub plane until I can move to a larger shed?

Have you had complaints before?

I live on fairly quiet housing estate and I just make sure I never use it after 9pm, never more than a couple of days in a row, and no more than 1 hour at a time. I have never had any complaints.

I could hear a guy 4 doors down building a deck over a period of several weeks with an impact driver, and I think this loud intermittent clattering travelled further and was way more irritating than a thickness planer for 30 mins once a weekend.

You also have the option of doing some sound proofing in a workshop...





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By chris-a
#1157453
I'd say your best bet is one of the small Electra Bekums such as the one in this video, induction motor plus you get the planer as well as the thicknesser for a small footprint

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FfHZoaWpkRY
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By MarkDennehy
#1157530
Bodgers wrote:Have you had complaints before?

No, but I've done virtually everything by hand from the start. The mitre saw got used for about two hours two years ago when I broke down the 2x4s I built the bench with, and I've used the router so little I can literally count the number of cuts I've made with it in the last two years (14), and the circular saw got a little more use but not very much - it lives in its box for months at a time.

I live on fairly quiet housing estate and I just make sure I never use it after 9pm, never more than a couple of days in a row, and no more than 1 hour at a time. I have never had any complaints.

Thing is, this housing estate's residents are... well, I've come across more precious people to be fair, but I just don't see a lunchbox planer being something they'd put up with.
Or, for that matter, be able to identify...

You also have the option of doing some sound proofing in a workshop...

There's some there already but it's more for dampening echos; there's only so much soundproofing you can do in an 8x6 shed, and it barely keeps the noise of hand morticing down to neighbour-acceptable levels if I close the door of the shed.





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By Terry - Somerset
#1157658
I'm obviously insensitive to the impact on my neighbours of woodworking machines, although I do live at the end of a fairly low density cul-de-sac.

Routers, planers and thicknessers are noisy at the hobby end of the market. But I've come to the conclusion that being part of a community is about tolerance - therefore I will only create lots of noise during the day from about 10.00 to 17.00, and rarely for more than 30-60 minutes at a time. Equally I don't object if neighbours fill the road with trade vehicles to replace a kitchen, spend Sunday afternoon power trimming hedges, use pneumatic tools to resurface a drive etc etc.
By sunnybob
#1157674
"spend Sunday afternoon power trimming hedges",

Oh mate, thats red rag to a bull that is. Before I retired I used to rant and rave about sunday noise, especially leaf blowers that go on and on and on and on and.......
Once I retired and took up this noisy hobby I have (rather than be called a hypocrite) declared sundays as volountary noise abatement days. only making any noise on that day if it was really urgent to finish something.

Mon to sat office hours, anything goes.
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By MikeJhn
#1157701
Its not the hedge trimmer/mowers that get me, its the doors on the car open and the radio on full blast, thank the Lord I don't have any near neighbours.

Mike
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By MarkDennehy
#1232064
So after another annoying thicknessing session this weekend which left me with missing skin and blisters on the bits of my hand that rest on the keyboard when typing (ie. this stuff's now affecting my day job), I'm rethinking the whole "be nice to my neighbours" thing and looking at getting a thicknesser again.

That axminster clone of the PT260 with the induction motor does seem to be a thing of the past, alas.

Did find a noise level check of a 735 with a helical head that seemed to be down around the same noise level as my belt sander, but finding one for sale in Ireland for less than the price of a car is proving difficult. Jet and the usual sheppauch/clones seem to rule the roost on lunchbox thicknessers over here.

Don't suppose I've missed any new lunchbox thicknessers being launched that focus on being less noisy than a jet engine at takeoff?
By sunnybob
#1232067
youre forgetting the actual noise of the wood being cut. My jet makes a lot of noise just running, but when it starts to cut the noise goes a little bit lower in frequency but definitely higher in volume.
How many planks do you use, and how often? if its 1 or 2 every few weeks then just do it.
if its 20 a day, you might get noticed.
By Woody2Shoes
#1232125
Another point to consider is the noise of the chip extractor which is fairly necessary for a p/t type machine.

Both my p/t and my chip collector are powered by induction motors, but when the blades hit the timber the p/t gets quite noisy and the c/c is equally noisy (mostly due to fan speed). So two sources of fairly loud noise (guess 85 dBA or more) - which, amongst other things, announce to a fairly wide audience the fact that you've got a workshop with machines.

I think that time of use is important, as is perhaps sound-proofing of workshop.

Cheers, W2S

PS I'm convinced that some of the thefts of leaf-blowers etc. from people's garden sheds are a last-ditch attempt by neighbours to get some peace and quiet!