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By AndyT
#1309610
Veering back onto a slightly more sensible comment, have I got it right in thinking that you are using the wood from the shelves to build the new cupboard? That does seem a very practical approach.

And if it's going to stand in the same place, I see no reason to paint the wall behind it!
User avatar
By MikeG.
#1309663
Yes, Andy, it's the old wood re-used, with a couple of new bits added in which were fortuitously left over from helping a friend with some re-roofing a couple of weeks ago. And yes, painting behind a cupboard which will have a back built into it would just be for the benefit of the spiders who found their way in there.
By sunnybob
#1309728
MikeG. wrote: And yes, painting behind a cupboard which will have a back built into it would just be for the benefit of the spiders who found their way in there.

And your viewing public! :roll: :roll: =D>
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By sammy.se
#1309765
watching with interest mike! thanks for the WIP.

If I had that Studley tool chest, everything would come tumbling down every time I reached for a tool. I think it would be a Frank Spencer moment every time.
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By MikeG.
#1309958
A little bit of progress. I took the side pieces out of their clamps, cleaned them up with a plane, then shaped the corners of the upstand alongside the "worktop":

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I then made the mistake of offering them up to the wall. I notched out for the skirting and a ceiling joist, then scribed the backs to the wall. It's almost as though I've never made any furniture before, as that took away my reference edge. That ruled out using a router jig to house out for the shelves etc. What a clown.

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So, I had to do an awful lot of measuring and marking, cut the top and bottom of the housing joints with a knife, freehand routed, and then cleaned up with a chisel. What a palaver:

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I glued up the shelves/ worktop:

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No harm done, but that really wasn't a good use of my time. I toddled in, chastened, and did some work. I hope to get a few hours at this tomorrow, so long as the phone doesn't ring.
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By MikeG.
#1310221
I got a couple of hours on this today, so a little progress to report. Firstly, I de-clamped and cleaned up the "worktop", cut it to length, and then formed the through tenons:

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I used these to locate their mortises:

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Remember the missing reference edge? I had to put some tape on my square so as to throw the mortise setting out accurately around to the other face via a non-reference edge:

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Then I chopped out the mortises in the usual way:

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The middle shelf was straight forward, with 2 through mortises, but the upper shelf is partly in a housing, and partly hanging in mid air.....thus requiring a dovetail joint. This produced rather a complicated end-of-board, with 2 through tenons, and two dovetail pins (and I seldom do pins first, but had no choice here). The tape is because the tenon split when I was cutting it out for the wedges:

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I very nearly cut it out upside down!!!:

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But got it right in the end:

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No time for a glue-up tonight, but I got the wedges ready for tomorrow:

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I've dry fitted both sides, so all looks ready to glue this thing together.....
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By MikeG.
#1310434
Space, as I've said, is a priority in my workshop. Here I am laying out an 8x4 sheet of ply ready for cutting, and I've got room to get all around it:

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That's the backing board, which I cut to size ready for the glue-up as a way of squaring everything up. I marked the factory edges. I had planned on a series of movable panels in the open area above the drawers, but changed my mind overnight and decided to put in a couple of fixed partitions. These were set in a housing top and bottom, and this was therefore the start of the glue-up:

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These fixed panels will form a really important function, which you'll see in a few days time.

Glue-up these days is a nerve-shredding exercise. I'm sick of it really. I need a cheap readily available glue that doesn't start going off in 10 minutes.....we never used to have this ridiculous problem. Anyway, with two dozens wedges to drive into through tenons, and some quite cupped timber, this was a glue-up from hell:

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One of the wedges burst through internally:

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Luckily, that's on the top side of the top shelf, so my repair should be invisible.....or at least, unseen.

With my main router table out of action (covered in the rubbish I moved from the shelves I am replacing), I had to drag my old one out of retirement:

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It clamps in the vice (it has a leg if I need it), and has an adjustable lift/ micro-adjuster, so it was a doddle to set up quickly to help with making the drawer support frames:

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By the time I had made them the carcass was dry, so I de-clamped and pinned on the ply back-board (using, shock horror........a hammer!):

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This photo might help understand the complication of the half-housed half-dovetailed corner join:

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I put that down as a useful afternoons work. I doubt I'll get too long on this tomorrow, but maybe I'll be able to clean up the tenons, and fix the drawer supports in place.
Last edited by MikeG. on 02 Oct 2019, 20:35, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
By AndyT
#1310438
Looking good, as expected!
For a slower setting glue, have you tried liquid hide glue? Titebond brand is pretty widely available.

It's perfectly strong enough for anything indoors. It cleans up really easily with a damp rag. Glue lines disappear.
And best of all, you get 15-20 minutes open time rather than 5-10.
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By Trevanion
#1310479
Ever tried Cascamite, Mike? I'm assuming you probably already have because you've been doing this long enough, but you can get very long open times out of it especially in the winter months. The constant mixing isn't always loved though :lol:
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By MikeG.
#1310482
Trevanion wrote:Ever tried Cascamite, Mike? I'm assuming you probably already have because you've been doing this long enough, but you can get very long open times out of it especially in the winter months. The constant mixing isn't always loved though :lol:


Yes, many times. The mixing is a nuisance, but minor. It's the shelf life which is more of an issue.
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By MikeG.
#1310483
AndyT wrote:
MikeG. wrote:I haven't, but I must. Even 15 or 20 minutes doesn't seem enough, though. I'd like half an hour plus.


I've just checked the spec and Titebond actually say 20-30 mins at 70°F (21 °C)

http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/9 ... 7daa20f8ed


I'd love to know what the difference is between "open assembly time" and "total assembly time".
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By Trevanion
#1310484
MikeG. wrote:It's the shelf life which is more of an issue.


I've also had it turn into rocks before a few times, the best solution I've found is to decant the main bucket into a bunch of used glass coffee jars (Or any kind of jar for that matter, maybe bigger jars would be advantageous because you can get a bigger spoon in there.) and put a bit of cling film over the top and put the lid on and put them away and just keep using the one jar until it's finished, then get another out, etc... The less open-air left in the jar the better.

Bit of a faff but better than letting it turn into big chunks in the bucket and much better than buying the smaller amounts at ridiculous prices.
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By AndyT
#1310493
MikeG. wrote:
AndyT wrote:
MikeG. wrote:I haven't, but I must. Even 15 or 20 minutes doesn't seem enough, though. I'd like half an hour plus.


I've just checked the spec and Titebond actually say 20-30 mins at 70°F (21 °C)

http://www.titebond.com/product/glues/9 ... 7daa20f8ed


I'd love to know what the difference is between "open assembly time" and "total assembly time".


Yes, I wondered that.

I can't say I've ever set a clock on how long a glue up takes, but I reckon you could take the shorter time as how long you can have wet glue on a piece before you assemble the joint. And the longer limit would be how long you've got to pull it up tight with cramps etc and still expect it to move.