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By Robbo3
#1208537
A pack of 4 long handled spoons from the £1 shop. Ideal for scooping out the shavings from a hollow form.
Tip 001 - Spoons.jpg


Grind away the top edge to make it smaller & drill a hole in the handle to hang it up.
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By Robbo3
#1208539
To blow out the shavings from a hollow form whilst keeping your eyes & nose out of the line of fire use a few inches of flexible tube which fits tightly over some solid tube.
Tip 002 - Blower.jpg


Or make an organ blower. Basically a large bicycle pump used to blow the dust out of organ pipes in the days before electricity. Very handy for cleaning down the lathe if you haven't got a compressor. I've made several for other wood turners.
The body is 63mm rainwater down pipe with piston, piston rod, handle & end caps turned on the lathe.
Tip 003a - Organ Blower - Internal.jpg


The handle endcap has four entry holes for air.
The piston seal is a piece of leather. It has to have a one way valve to allow it to seal on the push stroke but allow air through on the return. It consists of a flap cut in the leather to cover a hole in the piston.
Tip 003b - Organ Blower Flap.JPG
Tip 003b - Organ Blower Flap.JPG (37.51 KiB) Viewed 3359 times


The organ blower was a tip printed in the Good Wood Working magazine (July 1994)
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By Robbo3
#1208955
Lathe dust collection made from rainwater fittings & a plastic sweet jar. Connects to a shop vac.

Lathe Dust Collection 2.jpg


Lathe Dust Collection 1.jpg
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By Robbo3
#1210467
An easy to make holder to stop your tools rolling off the lathe. Drill a line of holes in a batten then cut down the length. A batten underneath is used as a stop - or a pair to straddle the bed.
Tip 004 - Tool Holder.jpg


The tool handle was made from beech taken from a kneeling stool, hence the dowel tenons. I'll bet there's not another one like it. :)
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By SVB
#1211242
Great post. Thanks for taking the time to put this up. Perhaps the start of a really interesting thread.

I’ll take some photos may be but my tip is to buy a couple of cheap roller blinds to mount around the lathe. Then, when roughing etc and the chips are flying everywhere, you can pull them down to make a mess space and save having to clear up the whole workshop and every surface at the end.
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By marcros
#1211558
Robbo3 wrote:An easy to make holder to stop your tools rolling off the lathe. Drill a line of holes in a batten then cut down the length. A batten underneath is used as a stop - or a pair to straddle the bed.
Tip 004 - Tool Holder.jpg


The tool handle was made from beech taken from a kneeling stool, hence the dowel tenons. I'll bet there's not another one like it. :)


I need to make one of these!
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By Robbo3
#1211563
SVB wrote:I’ll take some photos may be but my tip is to buy a couple of cheap roller blinds to mount around the lathe. Then, when roughing etc and the chips are flying everywhere, you can pull them down to make a mess space and save having to clear up the whole workshop and every surface at the end.

That was going to be a tip for the future but now that you've brought it up, I use roller blinds attached to the front of shelves to protect them from shavings & dust.
My main protection is a shower curtain surrounding the lathe on three sides. It's a snug fit for one person because of where it's positioned but I have no other fixing points for it. One of the downsides of using a concrete sectional garage as a workshop.
There is also another roller blind further back which I can lower if there are two of us in attendance.
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By Robbo3
#1211564
Chuck Removal Wedges.

Although called chuck removal wedges they are ideal for many other jobs such as removing the tips from a live centre where the gap is too small even for the supplied removal tool.
Of course they are excellent for removing tight morse taper items in the lathe or pillar drill. Available in 1,2 & 3 Morse Taper sizes.
- http://www.arceurotrade.co.uk/Catalogue ... dges---NEW
Tip 007 - Wedges.jpg
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By Robbo3
#1212761
Sanding disk made from Corian (thanks Chrispy). Stepped so that it fits whichever chuck happens to be in use at the time. A self stick velcro pad enables standard 3" hook & loop disks to be used & swapped easily.

Tip 008 - Sanding Disk & Cleaner.jpg


To clean the disks, laying on the bed is a tube of clear silicone which has been allowed to solidify. I use it as it is but there's no reason why it couldn't be cut into smaller pieces.
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By Robbo3
#1214369
Use cling film to stop wood drying out too quickly.

Tip 009 - Cling Film.jpg


I call this mini pallet wrap but it can be called various names. 10 rolls & an applicator are £14 on ebay. I've been using these for about 3 years & I'm only on my third roll.
Mini pallet wrap
By Bodger7
#1215330
Some great tips here. All relatively easy to achieve but they hadn't occurred to me! Thanks for sharing them.
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By Lazurus
#1215331
I use lubricating wax on all steel surfaces and my tools and chucks to keep rust at bay over the damp months, coupled with a cheap second hand de humidifier, workshop stays damp and rust free. Cheap second hand curtains from a charity shop easily hung around work space again to catch chips and debris. A mechanics garage trolley keeps all the frequently used stuff right beside me and is easy to wheel out of the way when not required, also gives additional storage space. Old washing machine motor transformed into a 10" disk sander, been using this for 18 years and still going strong. And have just discovered Yorkshire Grit, brilliant stuff....... =D>
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By Robbo3
#1216853
Brushes.
I've started using synthetic brushes for applying sanding sealer, whether acrylic, cellulose or shellac, mainly because I've found that not only are they are easier to clean than other types but they are usable between sessions & of course they are cheap.

Tip 011 - Brushes.jpg


If I used lots of sanding sealer, I would hot melt glue a brush into the lid of the container.
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By Robbo3
#1218036
Magnets

Tip 012 - Magnets.jpg


I use magnets all over the workshop. On the tail stock are a 150mm rule, a set of dial calipers, (they require a larger magnet because of their weight). A paintbrush with embedded magnets in both sides of the handle, because it can be hung from anything metal & it normally lives on the drill press. Another paintbrush lives on a head stock magnet & the pencil has a countersunk magnet screwed onto its end ... so that it never gets lost in the shavings.
All the magnets are attached with a spot of superglue so that they stay put & don't come away with the tool.
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By Robbo3
#1221299
Dial Calipers
Tip 014 - Dial Calipers.jpg


Very useful for accurate measurement especially if your eyesight isn't as good as it used to be.
The bottom two measure 10mm for one turn of the needle with each small mark being one tenth of a millimetre - more than accurate enough for any type of woodwork. The nylon ones are for general use & the metal ones for use on the lathe. One word of warning, round off the sharp corners of the internal legs if you use them on rotating wood.

The top pair measure in 64ths for the odd time when I need imperial & saves making a mistake with the size conversion.

The second pair from the top measure 5mm per rotation, which although more accurate, you have to take great care to see if the needle is in the 0-5 or 6-10 range.