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By Robbo3
#1267488
Collet Chucks

Tip 020 - Collet Chucks.jpg


APTC Junior ER20 collet chuck
SCT ER32 collet chuck (Chronos)
Both chucks are M33 thread to fit my lathe.
Both collets shown can hold approx the same size. The ER20 is 13-12mm & the ER32 is 1/2".
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By Robbo3
#1268709
Anti-static wipes.

Stop dust being attracted to your face shield, goggles or glasses by giving them a wipe with a tumble dryer sheet. Leaves them smelling nice as well.

Also makes cleaning up after turning plastic or resin very easy, almost a pleasure.

If you keep it in a sealed plastic bag after use it can be re-used a number of times.
The same applies to tac rags.
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By Robbo3
#1270131
Pin Holder

Often I need to remove some ingrained dirt or paint from for example a screw head or clean out an aerosol nozzle or unbung the superglue bottle tube but my fingers wont grip a pin for too long. So cut off the head & hold the pin in either an Archimedes drill or a pin vice.

Tip 22a - Pin Vice.jpg
Tip 22a - Pin Vice.jpg (27 KiB) Viewed 838 times


Tip 22b - Archimedes drill.jpg
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By Robbo3
#1272761
Wood splitting wedges

Tip 029 - Wedges.jpg


The 2 on the left are probably over 70 years old.
The conical one is best used at the end of a log rather than in side grain.
A bolster & cold chisels can also be helpful.

Logs for Ball 03.jpg


I also use a chopper & lump hammer for splitting firewood logs.

A combination of wedges, chopper & lump hammer were used to split this ash log. Took about 10 minutes.

Logs for Ball 01.jpg
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By Robbo3
#1274913
Logsaw
You don't need a fancy device to saw up the occasional log, a chair will do. Probably best not to use with a chainsaw.

Tip 021 - Log Saw.jpg
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By Jonzjob
#1274927
Robbo3 wrote:Wood splitting wedges

Tip 029 - Wedges.jpg


The 2 on the left are probably over 70 years old.
The conical one is best used at the end of a log rather than in side grain.
A bolster & cold chisels can also be helpful.

Logs for Ball 03.jpg


I also use a chopper & lump hammer for splitting firewood logs.

A combination of wedges, chopper & lump hammer were used to split this ash log. Took about 10 minutes.

Logs for Ball 01.jpg


I use a 6 ton vertical electro/hydraulic log splitter. It certainly takes the back out of it :mrgreen: It will take up to 1 metre logs. :mrgreen: :mrgreen:
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By Robbo3
#1275074
Horses for courses John. :) I suspect you use yours mainly for splitting firewood whereas I only need to split large logs occasionally as in the case of the ash trunk shown.
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By Jonzjob
#1275088
You got it in one R. But I have what the French call a 'coin' which is similar to one of your wedges that turns as you belt it in. Very efficient too. This is one of them

https://www.amazon.fr/Fiskars-%C3%A9cla ... in+de+bois

Once I get me head straight after our move back to the U.K. I will see what I can really contribute in ideas, but please excuse my sense of humour on this one :mrgreen:
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By Robbo3
#1277898
Wobble Chuck or Infinite Axis Chuck

Alan Stratton video - http://www.aswoodturns.com/2016/10/infinite-axis-chuck/
Made from a 2" pvc coupler, cut in half to make 2 chucks.

Tip 023a - Wobble Chuck.jpg


Tip 023b - Wobble Chuck.jpg


Various bottom & top rings to move the workpiece in or out.

Tip 023c - Wobble Chuck.jpg


The idea is that small woork pieces eg pendants, can be hot melt glued onto the moveable end to scribe an arc or multiple arcs.

Tip 023d - Wobble Chuck.jpg


This is a toy elephant's head where the trunk need sanding. Already having the chuck, it was quick & easy to knock up a suitable spacing ring.

Tip 023e - Wobble Chuck.jpg
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By Robbo3
#1283360
Tip 027 - Straws.jpg


A visual aid that can be orientated to show grain direction for example the undercut rim of a bowl or inside shoulder of a hollow form so that you cut in the right direction ie downhill.
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By Robbo3
#1288128
Spanners for the lathe.

Lathes tend to use fairly large hardware. Even if you have the right size spanner getting the room to use it can often be a problem. Luckily, you only need to make adjustments on the odd occasion & unless you posess a socket set then a cheaper option is a box spanner.

Tip 028a - Box Spanner.jpg


With the variation in sizes, especially at the larger end, spanners tend to be somewhat expensive. Those made of pressed steel, or home made, won't take a much abuse. At long last there are some cheap (£6) adjustable spanners available from China. They look to be cast aluminium which should be stronger than the pressed steel, home made polycarbonite or wooden ones. Their shortcomings should be outweighed by their short length & massive adjustability.

Tip 028b - More Spanners.jpg
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By SVB
#1288394
Robbo3 wrote:Spanners for the lathe.

At long last there are some cheap (£6) adjustable spanners available from China.


Do you have a link, looks great.

Simon
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By Robbo3
#1288573
SVB wrote:
Robbo3 wrote:Spanners for the lathe.

At long last there are some cheap (£6) adjustable spanners available from China.


Do you have a link, looks great.

Simon

Ebay item number 153291424786
£5.75
By graduate_owner
#1290181
I have a sheet of thin plywood on the floor at the back of my lathe. This helps to avoid damage to the end of my turning tools when they fall off the bed, which they always seem to do. I put them there temporarily rather than putting them back where they belong, but got fed up of having to re-sharpen after they hit the concrete floor.

K
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By Robbo3
#1290275
graduate_owner wrote:I have a sheet of thin plywood on the floor at the back of my lathe. This helps to avoid damage to the end of my turning tools when they fall off the bed, which they always seem to do. I put them there temporarily rather than putting them back where they belong, but got fed up of having to re-sharpen after they hit the concrete floor.K

I agree but it depends on your lathe & your situation.
I have two shelves under my AT1628VS lathe. The bottom one holds heavy items to give the lathe some extra weight & the top one extends to the rear wall to collect anything that drops & to catch all the shavings. This makes cleaning up easier as they can all be brushed straight into a large plastic container.
A simple tool holder for the lathe bed (as shown in previous photos) also helps. :)