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By Bodger7
#1273023
Hi All
I have decided that I would like to try some thread chasing and about a year ago I bought the Robert Sorby hand tools. I have now discovered that hand chasing is only possible with very few native timbers so I am thinking of either making or buying a thread chasing jig. I have now (carefully) read the posts by tekno.mage (Kym) about making and using her own jig and they were very impressive. I have doubts about having the skill or the patience to copy it but this remains a possibility.
Question 1. Has anyone had success with hand thread chasing in native timbers other than boxwood or am I right in concluding that that, realistically, is a non starter?
Question 2. Has anyone used the jig that is currently for sale (£99) on eBay and if so with what results?
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/PROFESSIONAL ... 2958482698. They seem to have been advertised for several years but I couldn't find any reviews of them.
Question 3. Are there any other jigs available at around £100 or so?
Thanks.
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By Paul Hannaby
#1273158
You can cut threads in softer woods with thread chasers by reinforcing the thread with CA glue. You may end up with a thread that is as much glue as wood but it will work!

Using the threading jigs to cut threads in softer woods may result in a good thread but if the wood is soft, it will be easily damaged so is there any point? Perhaps an alternative is to make threaded inserts with a harder wood so it's more durable, even if the rest is softer wood.
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By Robbo3
#1273186
The first thing to get right for chasing threads is the timber. That's why box is so popular. Look at the examples in the Ebay link, closed grain hardwoods.

You are more likely to cut good threads with a jig provided you get it set up correctly. As mentioned, poorer woods can be flooded with superglue to help prevent breakout or to get a better finish.

Hand chasing is a little knowledge & lots of practice.

John Berkeley has a series of books on chasing threads.

If you decide to purchase a jig make sure it has a solid stem as some were sold with tubular stems which deformed quite easily.
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By Honest John
#1273292
+1 for Paul and Robbo regards CA glue. I have hand chased many threads on boxes made from pretty plain and common hardwoods. From memory clean pieces of Yew worked reasonably well, especially when toughened up with CA. The best solution though is to use box or similar inserts and cut the thread in that. You can cut the threads either before or fire gluing in the insert , I’ve done both. I also have one of the jigs that you’ve linked too. Well, why wouldn’t I? As a self confessed “tool tart”. The jig is ok but still requires some set up and practice to use reliably. It is not as well engineered as Simon Hopes version, but then there is a considerable price difference between the two. Out of choice I would hand chase rather than set up the jig. The cutter of the jig will certainly cut a thread in a block of cheddar cheese, but the same issues with the practicality of the thread structure\strength and exist whether hand chased or machine cut. CA again to the rescue! Machine cutting threads into a cross grain project works well with the jig, but of course the advantage of cutting 50% threads into long grain and therefore strong grain, are offset by the potential movement issues if you have a constantly changing humidity, but it has worked well. Threading is a lot of fun, and if it was easy wouldn’t perhaps have the same appeal.
By Bodger7
#1273347
Well after watching the video suggested by Brian and reading the advice of Paul, John and Robbo I think that I will buy the jig but also try hand chasing as well. I use mostly (almost all) green wood obtained from tree surgeons etc so I suspect that I will be safer with the jig. Also boxwood seems very expensive when most of my wood costs very little.I am also a sucker for a new tool. The Simon Hope jig does look an impressive bit of kit and I have seen a demo given by Simon. However, the difference between £99 and £275 is too much to justify buying it.
Thank you all for your input, it was all very helpful.
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By marcros
#1273350
I know little about threading, but there was a WIP done once about making turned boxes on here. I think it was by George Watkins but the forum name may have been different.

The poster made a large number of these from dry, hybrid resin/wood blanks. He made sure that they were brought inside to acclimatise before the threading operation, so critical was the stability. From this, I infer that if you are using green wood, you need to be beyond certain that it has settled, if the professional was concerned about the difference between house and workshop.
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By Dalboy
#1273354
marcros wrote:I know little about threading, but there was a WIP done once about making turned boxes on here. I think it was by George Watkins but the forum name may have been different.

The poster made a large number of these from dry, hybrid resin/wood blanks. He made sure that they were brought inside to acclimatise before the threading operation, so critical was the stability. From this, I infer that if you are using green wood, you need to be beyond certain that it has settled, if the professional was concerned about the difference between house and workshop.



It could have been cornicopia
By Bodger7
#1273367
marcros wrote: From this, I infer that if you are using green wood, you need to be beyond certain that it has settled, if the professional was concerned about the difference between house and workshop.


Yes, thanks for that. I start off with green wood but keep it until it has seasoned properly. However, your point is well made.
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By Dalboy
#1273466
Bodger7 wrote:
marcros wrote: From this, I infer that if you are using green wood, you need to be beyond certain that it has settled, if the professional was concerned about the difference between house and workshop.


Yes, thanks for that. I start off with green wood but keep it until it has seasoned properly. However, your point is well made.


This is how I rough turn my box blanks from green wood I follow George's method

George Watkins